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#1 Posted by Moriarty (48 posts) -

I've been 23 since the first of july, but that number has already been hanging over my head and I can already hear the number 24 just around the corner. I currently don't have a job, I only have the 9th grade. I speak three languages and have no actual marketable skills ... other then creative writing, which I haven't really done or have had the quality assurance for anyone other then "I think I'm good at it." Oh and I still live with my parents ... what did you expect? This is the place my life is right now ... it's been like this for a while. But here are the steps I'm going to take, which will place me in a completely different position from the one I am now.

So, let's hop to it:

  • I'm going to actually try and find a job, rather then wait passively for it to fall on my lap.
  • I'm going to stop buying comics, games, books, whatever, I'll read and play what I have. Save the goddamn money.
  • Save the goddamn money! I should also have, if the bank doesn't pull a fast one on me, around 5000€ (7000$), it was a 5 year saving things, it should be almost up.
  • When I have around 10000€ (12000$) I'll start to plan moving to New York. The usual, check with the embassy, paper work, yadda yadda.
  • Pack my shit and leave it here, travel light ... unfortunately the plane ticket alone sets me back 1000€. Should probably look for an alternative ... turtles or giant seagull, are on the list.
  • Get there, be in awe, kiss the ground, use baby wipes on mouth, keep it cool ....
  • Find youth hostel for 3 or 4 days till I get shit straight, then use internet to search for shared apartment. Found some on craigslist, it ranges from 500$ to 4000$, of course I'll go for the cheap shared one.
  • FIND JOB! Search Internet, knock on doors, URGENT URGENT, MAY DAY!! My savings are not going to last forever, eat cheap, no luxury, read books to keep sane and not jump of Brooklyn bridge.
  • Like I said in the intro, I don't have a lot to write on a CV, so I'm not expecting anything cushy. But it's the actual start of my adult life and I'm willing to make sacrifices.
  • Once settled and with a job. I'll explore, mingle, I'll make friends ... not really sure how, but I'll manage.
  • I'll definitely need contacts in the "biz." I'll go to open mic nights, perform stand up. Get an agent, start working as an extra, try and get a speaking role. Get a feel for the productions and learn how things get made.
  • Writing, I'll do lots of it. The sensory overload of the city will make my mind race and I'll finally start putting my ideas on the paper and hopefully with the knowledge I've gotten, I'll be able to start looking for someone to buy a script of publish a book.

Even if the last point doesn't happen immediately but all the other points do, I'll have a job, a place to call home, friends and ... I'm leaving in New York, that's pretty perfect position to be in live by the point I'm 28. I didn't mention anything about language, but my english is as good if not better then my native language, strangely enough my thoughts have been in english for over 5 years. I bet all it'll take is a week or two for my tongue to get up to speed. I might still have some difficulty with some words like "girlfriend" ... gurlfrand? When they played the Avril Lavigne song during TNT ... and I ended up singing it, every time that word came up I sounded like Bill Murray in Caddyshack pronouncing "gopher."

Anyway, enough dilly dallying, what do you duders think? Is this myth busted, plausible or confirmed? And if you have some advice, I'd be more then glad to read it.

#2 Posted by endaround (2147 posts) -

Getting a work permit for the US without a job lined up before hand is very, very hard.

#3 Posted by Benny (1953 posts) -

How do you move to america permanently without a green card?

#4 Edited by mnzy (2916 posts) -

I guess that's a detail he missed. 
Also, sounds like you should get some education, a degree to actually...get a job, you know?

#5 Posted by drdeanos (8 posts) -

Without getting bogged down in the specifics of your plan, I would suggest that if you want to be a writer you should start writing the stuff you want to make a living at now, you don't need to be in NY to do that.

Think how much more likely you are to succeed in 5 yrs time (or sooner) if you spend the time between now and then working at and practicing the occupation you want!

#6 Posted by Emperor_Jimmu (249 posts) -

So you are planning to be an illegal immigrant working a menial job in New York while writing? Scenario a) you are discovered as the Kerouac for a new generation you probably are. Scenario b) deportation. Scenario c) you die. I like them odds.

#7 Posted by Moreau_MD (402 posts) -

@Emperor_Jimmu said:

So you are planning to be an illegal immigrant working a menial job in New York while writing? Scenario a) you are discovered as the Kerouac for a new generation you probably are. Scenario b) deportation. Scenario c) you die. I like them odds.

#8 Posted by Tim_the_Corsair (3065 posts) -

What languages do you speak duder?

Because if you have command of English as well as high level of something that is spoken a lot or is simply popular in specific international companies, you could well get your foot in the door with either a media or corporate translation job.

I would be looking specifically into media monitoring positions (although in my experience these are usually looking for fluent speakers of Asian languages, I have seen positions come up for various European languages as well) or other such translation work (publishers are another place that frequently look for people fluent in multiple written languages).

Finally, my understanding is that the US is one of the harder countries to emigrate to without having work lined up already; why do you have your heart set specifically on New York, and have you considered other countries? I can heartily recommend Australia, for example, although it is perhaps less suitable if you are pursuing a career in film or theatre.

#9 Posted by Moriarty (48 posts) -

Oh geez lots of answers to manage.

@endaround: @Benny: I'm sorry I skipped over the important part, but I did mention "paper work." I'll visit the american embassy here in Luxembourg and see what the process of moving would entail.

@mnzy: I'm not talking about jobs that need education. I'm talking about waiting tables, construction work and the likes. So I'm not going back to school, I might frequent a community collegue. I'd be up for that.

@drdeanos: It's not that simple. Not to bore you with details, but my mind needs to be stimulated to a point of excess. I don't get that here, I live in the middle of scenic hills and forests. Pretty, but completely useless to help spark any kind of inspiration.

@Emperor_Jimmu: I'm afraid of the c) but I'm not talking about moving to Baltimore.

#10 Posted by Hunter5024 (5820 posts) -

If you speak 3 languages fluently you may be able to get some sort of job doing that?

#11 Posted by Moriarty (48 posts) -

@Tim_the_Corsair: My French is meh. Portuguese is my native language and my English is as good as my Portuguese. My thoughts really are in English, I wasn't kidding.

I have to admit the reason it's New York is the mysticism of the city, the love people feel for it. Plus it's the multiculturalism of it, it's like the world smushed together. Plus Woody Allen, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Jon Stewart and Vinny Caravella are from there.

#12 Posted by Moriarty (48 posts) -

@Hunter5024: Two fluently, one not so much. I could work on it for the year or two before moving.

#13 Posted by Dunchad (501 posts) -

I don't see why moving to US is on that list. You use € when talking about money, so it's a safe bet you're currently living in EU. Unless it's one of the shittier EU countries, I think it's a safe bet you're better off here than in US. How about you try and move to a different city in your own country and see how you deal with living on your own and paying rent.

I would also suggest looking at getting an education - a lot of countries here provide it for free. So should your other plans fall through, you'll always have a backup plan that can provide income for rent and food. Some 3 year degrees you can (at least here) complete as fast as in a year, by skipping extra courses and doing practical exams to show your ability.

But then again that's just me - I always have a backup plan for my backup plan. Some people are more adventurous (or fucking stupid, depending on your perspective) and they might like the idea of saving up a bit of money, moving abroad and then hoping for the best.

#14 Posted by 49th (2785 posts) -

We have the same birthday yeaaaaaah!

#15 Posted by Moriarty (48 posts) -

@Dunchad: I can't get a degree with the ninth grade. I went to night school for a while, at the end I'd have the equivalent to the 12th grade. But I always thought it was a scam, so I dropped out. I was right, the whole thing got shut down by the ministry of education a while after I had quit.

I think I might be naive in the choice of city. But the place you live influences who you are and how you feel. I feel it calling for me. I'm probably starting to sound like the nuts that hear god's voice coming from the a cereal bowl. But I really do feel NY is the place I'll feel home.

#16 Posted by Moriarty (48 posts) -

@49th: So does Pamela Anderson. So we're in good company.

#17 Edited by mutha3 (4986 posts) -
@Moriarty said:

Oh geez lots of answers to manage.

@endaround: @Benny: I'm sorry I skipped over the important part, but I did mention "paper work." I'll visit the american embassy here in Luxembourg and see what the process of moving would entail.

Might wanna think about moving to the UK instead. Does London call out to you through a cereal bowl? Because migrating to another country is  much, much less of a hassle inside of the EU.
 
Getting some kind of degree might help you with this whole writing gig you've got planned. To which I got this for you: Scotland. Free education for every EU citizen. For real. If you want to live by yourself in another place and study at the same time, that is a prime location. Higher costs of living, though!
#18 Posted by Ramone (2975 posts) -

Your English is not as good as you think it is, it's great but it's clear that it's not your native language which I imagine would make it difficult to have a successful career in writing.

#19 Edited by Dunchad (501 posts) -

@Moriarty said:

@Dunchad: I can't get a degree with the ninth grade. I went to night school for a while, at the end I'd have the equivalent to the 12th grade. But I always thought it was a scam, so I dropped out. I was right, the whole thing got shut down by the ministry of education a while after I had quit.

I think I might be naive in the choice of city. But the place you live influences who you are and how you feel. I feel it calling for me. I'm probably starting to sound like the nuts that hear god's voice coming from the a cereal bowl. But I really do feel NY is the place I'll feel home.

No vocational schools in Luxembourg? I mean, it doesn't have to be a university degree or even anything you particularly like. It's just something that you can use to get a job with reasonable wages. Nobody wants to do shitty 8 €/hour jobs - especially for prolonged periods. In my case, I completed a 3 year vocational qualification in business administration in a year or so, which lets me apply for accounting/payroll etc. jobs. Boring as shit, but starting wages in those jobs are around 2000 €/month. And once you get work experience, all sorts of other jobs possibilities open up that may not have anything to do with your degree.

Change in the enviroment can definitely be invigorating, but I would look at some options within Europe, before heading to the states. I'm not sure if you can get to a vocational school in Germany for example, but few years in Berlin or etc. doesn't sound too bad, to me at least. And one thing that comes with a degree and some work experience - if you get a job at a bigger firm (I've worked at two, so far), they often have job opportunities within the company that are abroad. Getting work permits and whatnot is a cakewalk in those situations.

Though, this path can also be dangerous. It's easy to get too comfortable and stop moving forward. Going back to being a student and surviving with 10 €/day for food after few years of pulling 30k€/year is really damn hard. Good thing I'm bored out of my mind with the current work, so it makes the transition a bit easier.

But yeah, I guess my point is - really think it through and try to come up with backup plans. Europe has a lot to offer and is an easier/safer option and as such, might serve well as a first step. No matter how inspiring the big apple might be, if you're stuck in a shitty job and your savings just keep dwindling - I'm not sure it would be worth it.

#20 Posted by Emperor_Jimmu (249 posts) -

Stay in the EU man! It is great here and you can work in any city you want with minimal hassle. I know it may not be so romantic from your perspective but the risk is minimal and the payoffs can be just as great. There is a lot of film and TV produced in Europe, especially the UK and France, so if you are good there will still be opportunities for you. You mention the multiculturalism of NYC, travel to any large EU city and you will see exactly the same thing. Wealth attracts people from all over the world. Healthcare is also an important thing to consider. The type of job you are hoping to find in the US will not offer health insurance, as a result you could find yourself in a bad situation, unable to pay for medical care. A country with free health care and a more robust safety net for the unemployed would be a more sensible option.

#21 Posted by Shaunage (715 posts) -

Wait... you intend to go to AMERICA to find work. You may have missed the last few years...

#22 Posted by BraveToaster (12589 posts) -

That doesn't sound like a good idea. For starters, you should have finished school. A high school education isn't much, but it's better than outright quitting school. You never specify what "biz" you want to get into. New York has a ton of immigrants trying to do the same thing you're doing; what sets you apart from them? What do you have to offer to employers that immigrants (and everyone else trying to get in the "biz") don't? Stay where you're at, continue saving money, and find a way to continue your education.

#23 Posted by bemusedchunk (700 posts) -

Having a plan is great, but having it be a flexible plan is even better.

Since I am just about 5 years older than you (29 here), let me just share what I've learned.

You need to be very flexible and be able to handle issues very well. Things will never got exactly as planned, and being able to pick up the pieces quickly, but also make a smart decision after is important. I ended up getting laid off for my first job ever right out of college (or uni, as you blokes call it) and I was devastated. I spend the following 9 months on unemployment and I ended up taking a job for less than what I was making on unemployment just to get out of the house and have an excuse to work. Was in that job for 9 months and hated it, but continued to work hard and find that "dream job".

Now I'm living in Boston, have an amazing girlfriend and work as network operations center engineer.

#24 Posted by Moriarty (48 posts) -

@Dunchad: You got it figured out in a very mature, safe, real world way. I just don't know if I want to base my life decisions in economical and sociopolitical advantages of a specific region. I actually wouldn't mind working a shitty job, like a construction worker or waiter for a year or two. The city in itself would be a deterrent to monotony and routine.

I think 3 years is a lot of time to put my life on hold, yet again. I need to put things in motion otherwise like you said, it's so easy to feel contented with the simple life, with no ambition and low standards. Just because it's easy and low impact.

@Emperor_Jimmu: I understand that, but do you really want to base your decision on living benefits of a region compared to another. That's not all that matters. Yes I'm being naive, BUT I'm also thinking about the city itself. The people, the food, the history. I can attest to one thing, EU cities feel nothing like NY. People here feel somewhat soulless, easily pleased by what amounts to nothing. I'm not saying NY doesn't have people like that as well. But you can't deny the richness of culture and joy de vivre that city instills in people. Something no other place can boast of.

#25 Edited by Moriarty (48 posts) -

@BraveToaster: The one true biz ... Showbiz *jazz hands* Yeah, I fucked up royally dropping out of high school, but I look back and can actually trace my evolution as a person. I might have needed to do that to be where I am right now, mentally in a good place ... financially not so much, but I take the former over the latter. At least for now.

@bemusedchunk: Oh I'm really to fail like a motherfucker. I'd just rather fail in NY then in this country I hate. I'm ready to have a mediocre job with a less then stellar pay for the first couple of years. My dream job isn't being a big shot Hollywood filmmaker or a best selling author. I mean, it is, just not on that level. I being a small time director that still needs to have a second job to pay the bills, same applies for writing.

But it's always good to hear about someone making it. I'm happy for you duder.

@mutha3: I don't think most jobs related to arts need degrees. How many people take acting, writing, filmmaking classes and degrees and never make it big. It's knocking on the right doors, at the right time, with the right thing.

#26 Posted by binhoker (82 posts) -

If you think that moving to NY is going to inspire you as a writer, then I look forward to not reading all the work you don't publish. Having lived there it is a large, dull city full of people working insane hours to get by. Enjoy being grist to the city's gluttonous mill.

#27 Edited by Sooty (8082 posts) -

Why the hell would you want to live in New York? Getting the subway every day would drive me fucking NUTS.

Have you actually been to New York? It's not a very nice place, except Central Park. I love Central Park.

#28 Posted by Moriarty (48 posts) -

@binhoker: To each his own, sorry you feel that way. Hope you're in a better place now ... I don't mean that as "he's in a better place now" as in heaven. I'm not wishing you were dead ... or am I?

@Sooty: There are also buses, bikes, cabs ... feet? Plus they are not as bad as Japanese subways.

#29 Posted by Sooty (8082 posts) -

@Moriarty said:

@Sooty: Plus they are not as bad as Japanese subways.

I'm gonna have to disagree with you there.

#30 Posted by ProfessorK (825 posts) -

Dude the worst thing you can do before you have established yourself in something is to move to NY. The cost of living is extremely high, and there is so much competition for work. Just my 2 cents, stay and grow where you are and eventually you can make the move. Seriously, I've seen many a person come to this city with dreams only to have them crushed by realism and debt.

I'm not going to say that this is a soul consuming hell hole but the city only really shines once you have a foot hold. This is quite possibly the worst place to be and have to struggle.

#31 Posted by ProfessorK (825 posts) -

@Moriarty: I live in NYC and the subways that aren't the major hubs are complete dogshit. They're full of bums and rats at night and garbage in the day. They're sweltering in the summer and freezing in the winter. All the fare increases are for nothing, seriously they are just lining the pockets of the top men of the MTA. I've live here all my life and in almost 30 years I can honestly say than most all the subway stations still look the same, and not in a good way.

#32 Posted by Moriarty (48 posts) -

@Sooty: Ok, smell of shit and pee vs feeling like a canned sardine ... to me it's a toss up.

@ProfessorK: Grow where I am? I'm past growing age, I'm 23. But again, I get the "dream crushing" part. But I'm not fooling myself. I'm not going there to be a writer, I'm going there to be a regular working schlub, for the first couple of years. I'm also not under the impression I'll eat lobster and fillet mignon, by stomach is setting his sights on noodles for a great long time. I'll also not live in versailles, I looked on craigslist and found this place that for 1350$ (700$ security - 650$ monthly rent) I'll have to privilege to share an apartment with 2 people around my age ... that doesn't sound bad at all. I hope I'm not coming of as a sarcastic asshole.

I'm also very low maintenance, I wouldn't spend two thirds of the money I spend if I lived in a place that is sucking the life and joy out of me. Now in NY I feel like a walk would give me the same pleasure I get from reading a comic or playing a game. I might be wrong and I'll definitely need to have some security measures in case I have to pull the plug on the whole deal, but yeah ... I know I want to live there, even through the hard times.

#33 Posted by Sooty (8082 posts) -

@Moriarty said:

@Sooty: Ok, smell of shit and pee vs feeling like a canned sardine ... to me it's a toss up.

The canned sardine thing is pretty stereotypical to be honest and isn't as common as a lot of people seem to think, besides I've been in extremely crowded New York subways and much like the London Underground it is a pretty horrible experience. New York takes the prize for dirtiest though...by a long shot.

#34 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

@Shaunage said:

Wait... you intend to go to AMERICA to find work. You may have missed the last few years...

Or the last few decades. I'm not sure a lot of Americans react well to the words "five year plan".

#35 Posted by binhoker (82 posts) -

@Moriarty: Hey, fuck it, I had a ball in NY but I didn't need to work at the time ( and was not fool enough to tryto build a career in showbiz as an illegal immigrant with no education to speak of, or connections to speak of and no portfolio....or relevant experience ) .

Also if you have any ambitions in the dramatic field, then it should be painfully obvious where this narrative leads. I had made a feature length documentary by the time I was your age, a feat I could not have accomplished if I had to work 60+ hours a week to make rent in my fort green shoebox.

Make something before you go, don't expect cultural inspiration from NY, yellow cabs and hotdog vendors look pretty much the same as they do in every bit of media you have consumed up to this point.

#36 Posted by Moriarty (48 posts) -

@Sooty: Oh, I guess I shouldn't take "that one video" on youtube as law. But subway can't be the main way of transportation, is it? Because Jacob's Ladder made me terrified of New York's subways.

#37 Edited by Sooty (8082 posts) -

@Moriarty said:

@Sooty: Oh, I guess I shouldn't take "that one video" on youtube as law. But subway can't be the main way of transportation, is it? Because Jacob's Ladder made me terrified of New York's subways.

It kinda is because New York is hella, and I mean hella crowded. Cabs seem pointless considering how long they must take to get around, they have to stop constantly because of j-walkers and then the pedestrian crossings. Traffic is absolutely insane too.

The last time I took the subway I almost sat in vomit and had some crazy guy reciting the bible loudly in one of the tunnels.

I wouldn't recommend biking, I would be extremely worried about getting clipped by one of the 10 billion cars and stressed people trying to get ahead.

#38 Posted by MikkaQ (10318 posts) -

I don't even think you'll be let into the country, frankly. You have no skills, no degree, no education, no work lined up, there's just no reason to believe you'll ever contribute anything to the country, so why would the immigration officers let you in?

You said you could be a waiter or construction worker? Yeah right, construction is completely unionized so you'll never get into that mess, restaurants in New York are insane and everyone tries to be a waiter. It's extremely competitive, you practically need to be a sommelier or at least a similar level of knowledge to work in a restaurant these days.

Sorry if this all sounds harsh, but I've seen so many people in your position leave their country and spend a miserable 30 years in another country with dead-ends jobs, despite doing everything right to succeed. Then they end up living very poorly for decades. It's a sad life and I don't wish it on anyone. When even the kids born in New York have trouble getting menial low-pay jobs, and when even 99% the US-born writers can't get noticed or published, one should wonder if it's worth it.

#39 Posted by Moriarty (48 posts) -

@Video_Game_King: I guess that explains my fondness for Soviet style military anthems. Like the Red Alert 3 main theme.

@binhoker: I'd sort of appreciate if "illegal immigrant" term stopped being applied, considering I talking about going to the US embassy here and inform myself of the requirements to move.

We don't all have to follow a cookie cutter plan. Otherwise we'd all follow the exact steps of *insert famous/rich/powerful person here* and the world would be just swell.

And you can't really know what in the city will inspire me or not. I sure as hell don't, it's as random as it comes, but I know what triggers it.

#40 Edited by Sooty (8082 posts) -

@Moriarty: There has to be some sort of education plan you can go for - in the UK we have something called Access to Higher Education, it's a 1 year (2 in some places - less load) course that enables you to go to university. You don't need any prior qualifications to get on it, they just assess your level through some screening tests and work with you accordingly. After you finish it you can go to HND or university, it's a pretty good program for someone who left school with nothing and wants a pathway back into things.

I just don't see how you could get any real employment if you are living illegally, it'd be shady off the books low pay dull work, the US is pretty notorious for being extremely finicky with visas even if you have good reason & skills to go there, for example some married couples have trouble getting visas (like US citizen with a UK citizen) and even if they do get them it can take a long time. What about healthcare and such?

#41 Posted by Panpipe (475 posts) -

It's a terrible plan, might as well try it.

#42 Posted by Moriarty (48 posts) -

@Sooty: Wait ... NY is crowded? What about I am Legend, it would be just be me and Will Smith.

@MikkaQ: I know, I know. That is the realistic, harsh, cold, raw truth. I still want to try it, I'll most likely plan for it the best way I can. Some kill switch type of thing. Pull the plug if I have to.

Again, about the writing thing, I don't need to be a bestseller. I just want to do it, even if I still need a second job to pay the bills.

#43 Posted by Sooty (8082 posts) -

@Moriarty said:

@Sooty: Wait ... NY is crowded? What about I am Legend, it would be just be me and Will Smith.

Trust me everyone says NY is crowded but you don't realise just by how much until you get there. It's nuts.

#44 Posted by tachyon (18 posts) -

@Moriarty: Speaking as a person who lives in New England in the Northeastern part of USA, job opportunities in certain Northeastern cities are not the best the United States has to offer. New York often has a lot of jobs that require college education and/or connections to other people. Minimum wage jobs can be frustrating to come by in the Northeast part of the US when you are competing with people from the local area or other immigrants. Two things you got to know about United States is that US is in a recession so jobs suck, and outsourcing is so damn common that in my English and History class that I had two years ago we spent months talking about it. My recommendation as somebody from area is to choose the less overly glorified United States cities like Hartford, Boston, and so on. Lastly, remember 20th century New York, that is seen as immigration capital, is different than the modern New York, and as a key note don't listen to Jay-Z and Alicia Keys. Best of luck to you, don't take my words as gospel, but hopefully my viewpoint can give you more information to help you.

#45 Posted by Moriarty (48 posts) -

@Sooty: I'll look into it. I'd probably end up getting a degree on something that doesn't have a lot of actual value, simply because it's something interesting.

Pleeease people, stop saying "illegally" I've said and I repeat, I'll go to the US embassy here and inform myself. I'm not going to just jump into the plane and hope to sneak though the immigration scans .... my plan is a little more complex then that, but not by much.

#46 Posted by Moriarty (48 posts) -

@Panpipe: There you go, someone that gets me. Fortune favors the bold. What's the worst thing that can happen? End up knife fighting hobos for a cardboard box? Having my dead body dumped into the Hudson? .... Wait, those sound bad.

@Sooty: No, I was just joking. I know how crazy crowded it is.

@tachyon: I do hold NY in this heavenly pedestal, but I'm aware it's still a city. If I take one thing out of these thread is not to go blindly into it. Another city might not be a bad idea. Boston seems nice, I think I'd like the weather.

#47 Posted by Sooty (8082 posts) -

@Moriarty said:

@Sooty: No, I was just joking. I know how crazy crowded it is.

I know but I'm just saying, take how crowded you think it is then prepared to be kind of stunned when you actually get there. It had that effect on me at least.

#48 Posted by Moriarty (48 posts) -

@Sooty: Is it like Japan where there is the flow and you need to be on the right side otherwise it's impossible to move?

#49 Posted by TehBuLL (613 posts) -

To be young again. I don't WANT to rain on your parade because it is improbable, but maybe try to live on your own a bit in a setting you are comfortable with first? Sure I moved from FarmVille to Chicago when I was 21 but I had work experience and a person a girlfriend there to help. It just seems like you're putting the wagon in front of the horse without realizing you WANT to sweep up trash for the rest of your life.

#50 Posted by Sooty (8082 posts) -

@Moriarty said:

@Sooty: Is it like Japan where there is the flow and you need to be on the right side otherwise it's impossible to move?

What part of Japan? Obviously not everywhere is busy. ;)

Just when you step out of Port Authority don't stop on the street or you'll probably make someone walk into you or get pissed off when they have to walk around. That whole area is super busy.