• 90 results
  • 1
  • 2
#1 Edited by dr_nefarious (1619 posts) -

I need Irish last names for a story I'm writing about. I already have a few:

O'Brien, McGovern, O'Reilly, Mitchell, Kennedy, Moran.

What are some others?

#2 Edited by Frobitz (198 posts) -

McGuinness, Molloy, McCrea?

You could get away with using English, Welsh and Scottish surnames as well though, we do occasionally inter-marry ;-)

Big old list: http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~irlkik/ihm/irenames.htm

#3 Posted by erhard (439 posts) -

O'Dwyer.

#4 Posted by Yummylee (22534 posts) -

Scanlon.

Online
#5 Edited by syz (252 posts) -

Murphy/Murray. Extra Irish: add a "Mac" in front of them.

Had a super Irish calculus prof in university who was O'Connor.

#6 Edited by ajamafalous (12147 posts) -

O'anything

#7 Posted by BabyChooChoo (4803 posts) -

Potato

Online
#8 Posted by Joeybagad0nutz (1438 posts) -

Flynn

#9 Posted by mosespippy (4439 posts) -

@syz said:

Murphy/Murray. Extra Irish: add a "Mac" in front of them.

Had a super Irish calculus prof in university who was O'Connor.

Mac is Scottish, Mc is Irish.

Online
#10 Posted by EuanDewar (5098 posts) -

@syz said:

Murphy/Murray. Extra Irish: add a "Mac" in front of them.

Had a super Irish calculus prof in university who was O'Connor.

These aren't bad shouts, although nowadays I would think Murray and Mac names are more traditionally assumed to be of Scottish origin, even though they could infer either a Scottish or Irish heritage.

Although I am biased in that sense because those names are very prominent in my (Scottish) family. And y'know, Andy Murray and all that.

#11 Posted by FreezyFrog (115 posts) -

O'Hagan

#12 Posted by Jojojimmeny (60 posts) -

O'Brady... Beef O'Brady.

Sorry, I have no serious answers that haven't already been said.

#13 Posted by Lucidforest (143 posts) -

Flannigan!

#14 Posted by JadeGL (962 posts) -

Boyce and McGrath

The first is my maiden name. The second was my grandmother's maiden name. Both of Irish origin.

Moderator
#15 Posted by ArtisanBreads (3982 posts) -

Flynn!

#16 Posted by PimblyCharles (1636 posts) -
#17 Posted by GiantLizardKing (561 posts) -

Kelly, Cullinan, Mulvany, Fagan. I went to Catholic school so I should be able to come up with a lot more than that but that's what I've got.

#18 Posted by CreepingDeath0 (178 posts) -

Being born and raised in Ireland I'm just going to give you a bunch of surnames of people I went to school with. That way you can avoid the stereotypical MacThis and O'Everything (which really aren't as common as a lot of american media would have you believe).

DevlinBoyd
Brownlee
Benson
Sands
Mitchell
Stewart
Hopper
Campbell
Bell
Glendinning
Lewis
Strain
Dowell
Carley
And what the hell. The one Mc I knew in 18 years - McGuckin

#19 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

O'Flurnigan?

#20 Posted by MocBucket62 (1259 posts) -

Finnigan

#21 Posted by believer258 (12183 posts) -

Being born and raised in Ireland I'm just going to give you a bunch of surnames of people I went to school with. That way you can avoid the stereotypical MacThis and O'Everything (which really aren't as common as a lot of american media would have you believe).

DevlinBoyd

Brownlee

Benson

Sands

Mitchell

Stewart

Hopper

Campbell

Bell

Glendinning

Lewis

Strain

Dowell

Carley

And what the hell. The one Mc I knew in 18 years - McGuckin

Does the assumption that the O is pretty widespread irk the Irish, or do you guys just shrug and not care? If the latter, then I can't help but suggest "O'Glendinning."

#22 Posted by CreepingDeath0 (178 posts) -

@believer258 It's not that it annoys me exactly... but if I was reading a story that was set in Ireland in a town full of people with O' and Mac names it would just come across as ridiculous and kind of ruin the experience for me.

If it's just for one character in a story set elsewhere then go nuts. May I recommend the most irish name ever - Seamus Fitzpatrick.

#23 Posted by Feckhead (22 posts) -

@believer258: Don't mind it so much. What I do mind is the likes of @babychoochoo chiming in with "potato" and thinking it's hilarious, when in fact it's like saying "holocaust" to a Jewish person.....and thinking it's hilarious.

Anyway, my surname is Cullen and I'm Irish. I can suggest, Mahony, Byrne, McElroy, Collins, Kelly, O'Connell, Farrell, Murray, Duff, Buckley....all surnames of Irish people I know. But you can also be Irish and not have an Irish sounding name. Just putting that out there. ;)

#24 Edited by fatalbanana (211 posts) -

I'm partial to McMayhan, Gaughan, Finnerty, Garretty, Reynor and McCheese... like the mayor. That last ones a joke. Your welcome.

#25 Posted by Discoman (170 posts) -

Driscoll, Connolly, Leary, Darmody, Thompson, Shay or Shea. And so on.

#26 Posted by Do_The_Manta_Ray (739 posts) -

How about the miracle that is google? There's some expansive results on the subject.

#27 Posted by GrantHeaslip (1677 posts) -

Heaslip! As I understand it, it's technically English in origin, but with strong Irish ties.

#28 Posted by TheLark (150 posts) -

I'm Irish. Called McCullough.

#29 Posted by TheHT (11771 posts) -

Ronan

Online
#30 Posted by Jimbo (9984 posts) -

Paddy O'Furniture

#31 Edited by TheHT (11771 posts) -

Donnelly

Online
#32 Posted by Nubikal (107 posts) -

McDyer

#33 Edited by cloudnineboya (844 posts) -

phil Mccrackin. seriously O'hair!.

#34 Edited by JadeGL (962 posts) -

@grantheaslip: That's the thing about name origins. Of the names I mentioned, Boyce could be of Scottish, English, or Northern Irish origins according to online sources. There are also discussions that it is the anglicized form of the Gaelic name Ó Buadhaigh, which sounds way cooler.

I was told by both my parents that my full name is "very Irish" and that most of my father's side of the family, and some of my mother's is from Ireland. I even had a great great aunt that was turned away from entry into the United States because on her forms she said that she was going to be a maid, but she was missing three fingers on one of her hands from an accident that she had as a baby. A pig had walked into the home through an open door and bitten them off as she lay in her crib, so they considered her unfit for the job and rejected the application. Or so I was told by my father. :)

Moderator
#35 Posted by VorlonGod (12 posts) -

Wouldn't that just be the name of any alcohol base drink ever?

#36 Posted by CByrne (288 posts) -

McLaughlin (Mick-Lock-Lin)

Byrne (burn) is pretty Irish too...

#37 Posted by OneFreeman (103 posts) -

Doherty is an awesome Irish surname. Oh and it's pronounced Dock-erty by the Irish.

#38 Edited by Scullinator (514 posts) -

Scully. Its an awesome name cause its mine. Yes you can borrow it.

#39 Posted by GrantHeaslip (1677 posts) -

@jadegl said:

@grantheaslip: That's the thing about name origins. Of the names I mentioned, Boyce could be of Scottish, English, or Northern Irish origins according to online sources. There are also discussions that it is the anglicized form of the Gaelic name Ó Buadhaigh, which sounds way cooler.

I was told by both my parents that my full name is "very Irish" and that most of my father's side of the family, and some of my mother's is from Ireland. I even had a great great aunt that was turned away from entry into the United States because on her forms she said that she was going to be a maid, but she was missing three fingers on one of her hands from an accident that she had as a baby. A pig had walked into the home through an open door and bitten them off as she lay in her crib, so they considered her unfit for the job and rejected the application. Or so I was told by my father. :)

Yeah, it seems like that's especially the case with names from the British Isles, though for all I know a lot of continental European names are just linguistic twists on the same root name as well.

Names also seem to often diverge in spelling as they spread. "Heaslip" is commonly spelled as "Hislop", "Heslop", and "Hyslop", among others. I think "Heaslip" is the most common overall (and looks and sounds better in my biased opinion), but not by very much, and that's probably not the case in certain regions.

Also, that's a pretty horrifying story, and pretty awful for her if she'd paid for the long journey overseas.

#40 Posted by JadeGL (962 posts) -

@jadegl said:

@grantheaslip: That's the thing about name origins. Of the names I mentioned, Boyce could be of Scottish, English, or Northern Irish origins according to online sources. There are also discussions that it is the anglicized form of the Gaelic name Ó Buadhaigh, which sounds way cooler.

I was told by both my parents that my full name is "very Irish" and that most of my father's side of the family, and some of my mother's is from Ireland. I even had a great great aunt that was turned away from entry into the United States because on her forms she said that she was going to be a maid, but she was missing three fingers on one of her hands from an accident that she had as a baby. A pig had walked into the home through an open door and bitten them off as she lay in her crib, so they considered her unfit for the job and rejected the application. Or so I was told by my father. :)

Yeah, it seems like that's especially the case with names from the British Isles, though for all I know a lot of continental European names are just linguistic twists on the same root name as well.

Names also seem to often diverge in spelling as they spread. "Heaslip" is commonly spelled as "Hislop", "Heslop", and "Hyslop", among others. I think "Heaslip" is the most common overall (and looks and sounds better in my biased opinion), but not by very much, and that's probably not the case in certain regions.

Also, that's a pretty horrifying story, and pretty awful for her if she'd paid for the long journey overseas.

Yeah it is a horrible story, unfortunately. I know that she went back and had a good life, and I still have family there to this day that I haven't had the chance to meet, a lot of cousins mostly, that kind of thing. My hope is that the story got worse with age and that it was embellished over time, but she did have to go back due to the disability, so I guess it's a faint hope really. It's interesting to think that for all the people that made it into the United States, there were still people turned away for such small issues.

Moderator
#41 Posted by PatODay (223 posts) -

@jimbo: That's my nickname at work, minutes into my first day when someone found out my name was Pat O'Day they came up with that gem and it's stuck with me. It's since been shortened to Paddy O, at least.

#42 Edited by Feckhead (22 posts) -

@onefreeman: No it's not. It's pronounced like that by UK folk. They also pronounce it Dough-arty, which is also incorrect.

#43 Posted by OneFreeman (103 posts) -

@feckhead: Odd because I've worked with two Irish Dohertys in my life and they both pronounced it like I said. Maybe it's a Northern / Southern thing?

#44 Posted by Feckhead (22 posts) -

@onefreeman: Possibly. But I've never come across it. Then again, I've spent the majority of my life in Dublin and only a fraction in Belfast and Derry.

#45 Posted by coljae (17 posts) -

Ó Coileáin was my family name before they moved to mainland and changed it to Collins. Or that could just be my dad lying to me.

#46 Posted by shorthair (67 posts) -

I'm from Ireland. I can help with pronunciation if you need.

Malone

Tierney

Guinnane

McMahon

O'Mahony

Walsh

O'Sullivan

McNamara

Kelly

Kinneally

McKeown

O'Donnell

McLoughlan

Casey

Guilfoyle

Loughnane

O'Gara

Doyle

McDonnell

Keane

O'Brien

Flemming

O'Grady

Fitzgerald

Hickey

Cahill

Ryan

O'Shea

Murphy

O'Dea

O'Keefe

Maher

O'Looney

Cook

Doherty

Haugh

Meehan

Donnelly

Shaw

O'Neill

Hennessy

Barry

Joyce

Grant

McCormack

Lynch

#47 Edited by MonkeyKing1969 (3024 posts) -

Collins, Campbell, Clarke, Johnston, Hughes, O'Farrell, Fitzgerald, Brown, Martin, Maguire, Nolan, Flynn, Thompson, O'Callaghan, O'Donnell, Duffy, O'Mahony, Boyle, Healy, O'Shea, White, Sweeney, Hayes, Kavanagh, Power, McGrath, Moran, Brady, Stewart, Casey, Foley, Fitzpatrick, O'Leary, McDonnell, Donnelly, Regan, Donovan, Burns, Flanagan, Mullan, Barry, Cunningham, Griffin, Kenny, Sheehan, Lyons, Reid, Graham, Quinn, Kelly, Kelley, Higgin, Cullen, Keane, King, Maher, McKenna, Bell, Scott, Hogan, O'Keeffe, Magee, Molony, Buckley, and... OF COURSE O'Dwyer

First names are easier - [deep breath] Marky, Ricky, Danny, Terry, Mikey, Davey, Timmy, Tommy, Joey, Robby, Johnny, Brian...and Willy.

#48 Posted by wjb (1696 posts) -
#49 Posted by TheSouthernDandy (3924 posts) -
#50 Posted by rachelepithet (1392 posts) -

Pipebomb