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#1 Posted by sfighter21 (798 posts) -

In remembrance of ALL those personally effected by the events that transpired 10 years ago.  Whether it was the loss of a family member or a close friend, I just wanted to show you my support.  We will NEVER forget.

#2 Posted by Matthew (1912 posts) -

I think it would be interesting to get an international point of view on this. Sure, you guys may not agree with our War that we started thanks to this wonderful event, but that specific day, 10 years ago...what was your opinion on that?

#3 Posted by Three0neFive (2292 posts) -

Happy 9/11 dawg

#4 Posted by ThePickle (4168 posts) -

I was only 6. I had no idea the impact of what happened. I live very close to NY. I'm sure if it happened now I'd flip a shit.

#5 Posted by Dunchad (486 posts) -

Shit was crazy.

#6 Posted by Matthew (1912 posts) -

@CaLe: Well, yeah. It was on the TV all day, but I lived in Washington DC at the time. Hell, my dad had to come home early because he worked close to all the monuments and such, so he was at risk (not even 200 yards/meters from the Lincoln Memorial). He could see the smoke from the Pentagon after the plane crashed, all from the view from his office window. But was it strong enough to be broadcast in your country for a good deal of the day?

#7 Posted by The_Martian (48 posts) -

I was getting ready to go to school when it happened.

#8 Edited by Cheesebob (1236 posts) -

I'm more saddened by the reaction by the American goverment tbh. Yes it was awful, but (I believe read it somewhere) is each person killed in that awful attack worth 80 people killed in retaliation?

#9 Posted by Little_Socrates (5675 posts) -

As an American, I like to remember the unity that ensued rather than the tragedy that happened. Maybe it is because I'm young; at 19 years old, I was in fourth grade when the attacks happened; but what resonates with me is not video or photography of the atrocities, the devastation, or the victims; but rather the speech of a man we now consider simple-minded, a man who was not elected to face these disasters but was re-elected nonetheless, and a man who graduated from Yale and Harvard but still was derided as a moron for ten years afterwards. While I do not say I necessarily support his policies or even truly understand what he did to our nation over the last ten years, I can look at what he said in response to a disaster.

Let us never forget that our former president never attacked the Muslim people for the atrocity that occurred and respected all Americans in and of himself. He implemented security policies that individuals perverted, but always remember that the president himself is not in charge of that airport security guard who is only "randomly checking" Muslims. In his congressional address, he first acknowledges Al Qaeda as an extremist Muslim group, but also makes the point that they are "rejected by Muslim scholars and the vast majority of Muslim clerics, a fringe movement that perverts the peaceful teachings of Islam." George W. Bush sought to bring our nation unity when our security had been shattered.

#10 Posted by Twinsun (472 posts) -
@HandsomeDevil said:

I was only 6. I had no idea the impact of what happened. I live very close to NY. I'm sure if it happened now I'd flip a shit.

Man.. I feel old now..
#11 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

Is it possible to forget if you didn't remember to begin with? I remember nothing about that day.

#12 Edited by Dany (7887 posts) -

I was in fourth grade and throughout the day Ms. J was constantly going out of class to talk to other teachers about something. During lunch some kid mentioned it but we all said he was dumb and that would never happen. At the end of the day she told us to go home and not watch tv, just go home and read a book and to not watch tv. She was very adamant about that.

I came home, saw my brother watching it on tv and went about my business. I didn't grasp the extent of it until I saw the footage of the plane going into tower 2. The rest of the day and week I felt like shit.

#13 Posted by The_Martian (48 posts) -

@Little_Socrates: I would "like" your post if I could.

#14 Posted by AjayRaz (12424 posts) -

it was kinda scary since i visited the towers the month prior to the attacks 

Online
#15 Posted by Cloudenvy (5891 posts) -

I know this may sound cruel, but it's been 10 years and I'd really rather forget.

I hate all the TV stuff, the e-mails and such saying NEVER FORGET.

#16 Posted by Animasta (14675 posts) -

how can I forget

it's the only thing the news stations are showing

#17 Edited by TaliciaDragonsong (8698 posts) -

When I saw it I thought 'lol america', but hey I was 12 back then, more concerned about how to skip school again so I could play my games.

#18 Posted by Hailinel (24423 posts) -

In before eventual heated arguments that turn explosive, rendering a well-meaning thread into a travesty of idiots.

I was home from college, less than a month from starting my third year when my dad came in and woke me up to tell me what happened. It was pretty shocking, no doubt about that. I'm still not sure what possessed me to go out to the video rental that day and pick up The Evil Dead, though. Maybe I was looking for something cathartic, but I had never seen the movie before. I only heard it by its reputation in connection to Army of Darkness.

I'll just say that movie was depressing and not cathartic in any sense and leave it at that. On the other hand, it was still better than watching every news channel replay the disaster on TV over and over and over.

#19 Posted by _Horde (839 posts) -

@Matthew said:

I think it would be interesting to get an international point of view on this. Sure, you guys may not agree with our War that we started thanks to this wonderful event, but that specific day, 10 years ago...what was your opinion on that?

Was quite young at the time, so I just thought it was some TV show.

#20 Posted by Sargus (726 posts) -

My dad is a firefighter, so those deaths hit us harder than some. We're in Texas, so there wasn't a chance of him having to go fight those fires, but they did put out a call for help in NYC in the aftermath (a lot of good men died, leaving the city shorthanded) and my dad considered volunteering.

It was a tough day. My mom was at the airport, my dad was at work and my sister and I were at a friend's house. Yes, it led to some terrible things and even more terrible deaths, but 9/11 itself was a tragedy that should be remembered, no matter your political or religious views.

#21 Posted by Turambar (6742 posts) -

I lived in Queens at the time and went to high school in the Bronx, so I passed through Manhattan both above and underground via the subways daily, twice a day. Lets just say seeing that giant cloud of debris every day when the 7 train went underground near the 59th street bridge was pretty depressing.

#22 Edited by mnzy (2914 posts) -

I was 15 at the time, came home from school (I'm from Europe) and rode to driving school later with my bike and a friend and I remember that we talked about it for a long time, he was a big airplane nerd and we kept speculating about why and how. It was a really weird day for me.
 
Not to derail this thread, but what do you Americans think about that annual ceremony in Manhattan? I feel like it's too much, especially the name reading. 
This event has to be remembered, but isn't mourning a personal thing? Reading all the names every year seems so...I don't know, abusive? Hard to explain.

#23 Posted by Vodun (2370 posts) -

It's one of those events that I remember exactly where I was and what I was doing. Like some say about the moon landing for example.

#24 Posted by luchadeer797 (294 posts) -

I was 6 living in Connecticut and I remember getting off my bus and looking up to see helicopters flying over my house presumably off to New York and then walking into my house to see my parents standing horrified next to the TV. In retrospect it was a fairly surreal moment but the gravity of the situation never hit me then.

#25 Posted by Hizang (8532 posts) -

I was 9, so I remember not really paying any attention to it.

#26 Edited by FluxWaveZ (19330 posts) -

I was 7 and I'm Canadian, so I didn't even know about it. I didn't care about anything that went on in the news.

#27 Edited by RuthLoose (807 posts) -

Today's Funnies Section (the newspaper comics) was predictably depressing. Doonesbury takes the cake for sure.

#28 Posted by warxsnake (2650 posts) -

I'm American, Canadian and Lebanese. I remember watching that shit live back when I was living in Beirut, and I'll never forget, the most horrible part having been watching people jumping from the towers live. And then, the disbelief of the whole thing, especially after the two towers collapsing and generating those huge clouds of ash, making lower Manhattan look like something out of STALKER or Fallout.

I can't stand some of my Canadian friends (most of them the quebecois type) that like to be cynical about 9/11 and complain about American lifestyle and culture, and yet 90% of their lifestyle is based on American culture, including their use of Facebook to complain about these things in the first place, and their consumption of American services and products. Fucking double standard losers, all they do is whine about the States and like to bring up their false sense of superiority and intellect.

I've seen more blind hate towards Americans here in Quebec than in my 10 years in Lebanon. Some french canadians are some of the most hypocritical people I know.

Online
#29 Posted by TheHT (11155 posts) -

Hmm, I remember being at school, I think it was the first day for us. The teacher casually asked if we heard about some buildings getting hit in New York, to which we all responded 'wtf you talkin about' and then when I went home and was pissed when I noticed the TV in home room was outside in the living room (where the cable was, we had recently moved in).
 
Then I saw what was on screen and thought it was pretty crazy.

#30 Posted by Clonedzero (4200 posts) -

i was in school when it happened. in history class. apparently my teacher had a sibling in the towers or something, he was FLIPPING OUT. like he was crying one second, flipping desks over the next. screaming. we all ended up watching the news on the tv. it was pretty awkward.

#31 Edited by Branthog (5563 posts) -

It's hard to forget something that everyone is milking (for facebook comments, twitter follows, news ratings, trinket sales at Walmart, political points, etc) nearly every day of the year and double on "Patriot Day". Also, it seems like maybe this is something best moved to Off Topic?

As for my personal experience, I remember waking up around 9am (I telecommute, so I wake up when it's time to work; wasn't up early in the morning for a commute) and my colleague IM'd me about the WTC. I laughed and replied to her obviously lame attempt at a joke with something smarmy. She told me to go turn on the news and the rest of the day seemed pretty surreal, after that. Frankly, so did the following six months. That week, especially, was weird, because nobody knew what was going on and all the meetings and communications at work were either about employees feared lost or concern for our ongoing safety and maintaining our business services (I work with the largest private and government agencies there are, so it was vital that we remain stable and capable of providing service to people affected by the events - some who lost data centers in the city).

Fortunately, all that's behind us, now and "911 Never Furget Durp Durp" is just a convenient scare tactic to nudge the masses into accepting bullshit they'd otherwise be sane enough to refuse.

By the way, remember all those photos and videos of the entire world the rest of that month? It was like all the bullshit stopped and we realized how we had friends and admirers from every walk of life all over the planet that shared in the pain of that catastrophe. It outpouring of kindness was breathtaking. And then we managed to squander it and become the butt of the joke to all of those people who were reaching out to be allies in one of our darkest moments within about a year. Too bad we let that slip through our fingers.

#32 Posted by ze_ro (181 posts) -

People really should cut that god shit.

#33 Posted by SMTDante89 (2567 posts) -

I was 11 (2 days away from turning 12). I didn't hear about it until I got on the bus to go home that day. Our bus driver told us about it and I saw news about it when I got home. I really didn't understand and it didn't really hit me until about a week later. At the time, I never knew people would want to do such a thing.

#34 Posted by rmanthorp (3913 posts) -
Moderator
#35 Posted by Branthog (5563 posts) -

@_Horde said:

@Matthew said:

I think it would be interesting to get an international point of view on this. Sure, you guys may not agree with our War that we started thanks to this wonderful event, but that specific day, 10 years ago...what was your opinion on that?

Was quite young at the time, so I just thought it was some TV show.

Iremember during the first Gulf war. Psychologists were all over the air-waves trying to help people understand how to talk to their children, who were surely frightened to death by the events that were unfolding on television. Even my own little brother and sister were brought to tears at one point, because of all the coverage of the military action nearly 24x7. Being the much older brother, I tried to offer some comfort, only to find out that the reason they were upset about the war to the point of tears was because they missed the morning and afternoon blocks of cartoons that the constant news coverage was over-riding.

#36 Posted by Turambar (6742 posts) -

A friend of mine stilling living in NY is watching the coverage and informed me of this little piece.

This girl was reading off the names and gets to her father's, and says "dad, you were always my hero and idol. I can't believe it's been ten years since I've heard your voice. It was difficult growing up without you. I know you'll always be wa-" and suddenly the station cuts to commercials and the jingle for the ad said "It's eleven o'clock! It's time to buy a mattress!" It cuts back just in time to the coverage to catch the girl saying "-nk you for everything."

That kind of sums up my feelings on how the country as a whole treats 9/11 now. Somber respect and commemoration punctuated by exploitation of the most egregious kind.

#37 Posted by Claude (16255 posts) -

I was at work and we saw the news pop up on a small tv in the break room. At first, we, as all of the news media, thought it was a small plane. When the second one hit, we knew it was an attack. Of course everything went downhill after that. I was angry and heart broken for the innocent lives lost. It just goes to show how far human beings have yet to grow. I just hope we don't destroy ourselves before we reach our full potential.

#38 Posted by Make_Me_Mad (3075 posts) -

Was in middle school, but home sick with some kind of stomach flu-ish thing.  Was watching TV with my mom when whatever we were watching was interrupted with a report about what was going on.  We really didn't get how bad it was until the second plane hit, at which point we both figured that things were going to be getting really bad really quickly.

#39 Posted by Slaker117 (4838 posts) -

I remember waking up and seeing the TV on, and that was strange so I went to look. I saw the building burning and my dad came in and tried to rush me off to school. I asked him what was going on, and he gave some half answer that barely explained anything. Being only nine at the time, I didn't grasp any of the significance, I was just annoyed that I didn't get to watch more of it because it was an impressive sight. Once I realized that it was an attack, I didn't get why it was such a big deal, I just asked if it would be hard to rebuild the towers. It didn't even occur to me that people had been killed.

Ten years later, that memory is pretty surreal. I witnessed a horrible tragedy that would go on to reshape the political landscape of the world, and I barely cared.

#40 Posted by itsjoncharles (75 posts) -

I was home from school at that the time - I was only about 8/9. The time difference between the US and the UK means it was mid-afternoon here (so perhaps I was just in school).

Truly the most horrific event I have ever seen. Rest in peace to those who were claimed.

#41 Posted by Clonedzero (4200 posts) -
@ze_ro said:
People really should cut that god shit.
a wild bitter internet atheist appeared!
#42 Posted by cap123 (2477 posts) -

It's completely understandable that america mourns the anniversary of 9/11 but what kind of bugs me is how much coverage it's getting in england. Alot more people have died in worse disasters over the years, why do we give so much attention to this one? I guess its because so many white westerners died.

I mean, all the football games today had a minutes silence... I can't remember the last death/tragedy unrelated to the sport that got a minutes silence.

#43 Posted by falling_fast (2210 posts) -

I hate that they called it Patriot Day. Could you think of a more jingoistic name for your holiday? I think not.

#44 Posted by Makoto_Mizuhara_Sakamoto (592 posts) -
@Branthog said:

It's hard to forget something that everyone is milking (for facebook comments, twitter follows, news ratings, trinket sales at Walmart, political points, etc) nearly every day of the year and double on "Patriot Day". Also, it seems like maybe this is something best moved to Off Topic?

As for my personal experience, I remember waking up around 9am (I telecommute, so I wake up when it's time to work; wasn't up early in the morning for a commute) and my colleague IM'd me about the WTC. I laughed and replied to her obviously lame attempt at a joke with something smarmy. She told me to go turn on the news and the rest of the day seemed pretty surreal, after that. Frankly, so did the following six months. That week, especially, was weird, because nobody knew what was going on and all the meetings and communications at work were either about employees feared lost or concern for our ongoing safety and maintaining our business services (I work with the largest private and government agencies there are, so it was vital that we remain stable and capable of providing service to people affected by the events - some who lost data centers in the city).

Fortunately, all that's behind us, now and "911 Never Furget Durp Durp" is just a convenient scare tactic to nudge the masses into accepting bullshit they'd otherwise be sane enough to refuse.

By the way, remember all those photos and videos of the entire world the rest of that month? It was like all the bullshit stopped and we realized how we had friends and admirers from every walk of life all over the planet that shared in the pain of that catastrophe. It outpouring of kindness was breathtaking. And then we managed to squander it and become the butt of the joke to all of those people who were reaching out to be allies in one of our darkest moments within about a year. Too bad we let that slip through our fingers.

Try saying the same exact thing almost seventy years ago to those Marines and Sailors stationed at Pearl Harbor on the day after December 7th, 1941.
#45 Edited by innacces14 (735 posts) -

I remember my friend would always head over to my house before school so we can walk as a pair and I didn't have time to turn the tv on. We were already late so I was perplexed when he was giving me the details about what happened (50 minute walk). I really didn't believe it. It wasn't until I got to school and just felt the somber presence and the look on my teachers face and thought "oh wow. It's the real deal isn't it?". That entire time at school was filled with conspiracy theories, talks about more possible attacks hitting the west coast, and a broken trust to our government and the president. Really quite dour stuff for a kid in 6th grade.
 
The walk home was something to behold though. It was such a fucking wonder to see suburban homes, homes that usually bare Latin American flags (it's a SoCal city that's big on the illegal resident issue) all of a sudden carry a US flag, Low-rider Cadillacs donning the US flag on the hood, finally getting home and watching emergency services and volunteers come together to clean the mess up. That entire time it was just a realization and a spectacle to see humanity at it's worst and at it's best.
 
Of course, it's all putting into perspective of an American citizen. I doubt the rest of the world was as effected by what was going on and see this thread heading to the shitter. Regardless every country hits that point either by the tyranny of another nation, the act of a citizen of the very same country that isn't right in the head, or a natural disaster that caught a country by surprise. It's in the nature of human beings to come together, rebuild, and carry on.

#46 Posted by TobbRobb (4603 posts) -

That shit was all over the news, but I was a kid an didn't really care...

#47 Posted by wickedsc3 (1046 posts) -

My condolences go out to everyone who has lost someone, not just on 9/11. It sucks but death is a part of life. I find making it a big spectacle a little distaste full, but i'm a private person, I know if I lost someone in 9/11 I would be spending it at the cemetery not in down town NY, just as I do on the dates of my personal losses.

#48 Posted by zoozilla (978 posts) -

I was in elementary school.
 
I remember watching the news on TV, and the teacher didn't cover up the TV in time to keep us from seeing footage of a man jumping from the flames.
 
It was very weird - I remember I also had to write an article on the event for the school newspaper.

#49 Posted by asian_pride (1654 posts) -

I was 10, wasn't even living in the States yet but in the Philippines. Saw it on CNN by accident, saw the second plane hit and eventually the collapse of the Twin Towers.

#50 Posted by Hailinel (24423 posts) -

@damnable_fiend said:

I hate that they called it Patriot Day. Could you think of a more jingoistic name for your holiday? I think not.

It's barely even a holiday. No one gets it off and most of us tend to forget it even exists.