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#1 Posted by algertman (852 posts) -
#2 Posted by MattyFTM (14367 posts) -

There are a bunch of reasons to be skeptical over the Ouya kickstarter, and that article does a good job of articulating many of those reasons. It doesn't have anything to do with the PA kickstarter at all. Ouya sounds like it could be cool, but it's a long way away from being a finished product, and people are laying down a lot of money for something that might not live up to expectations. A degree of skeptecism is needed.

Moderator
#3 Posted by Sweep (8843 posts) -

Why would they be jealous? How did you reach that conclusion? It's not like supporting one excludes you from supporting the other. Frankly I think it's wise to be sceptical of a project which, at this point and time, is based on optimistic promises and not a lot else. Penny Arcade have also frequently attempted to highlight and support the best kickstarter projects, so any notions of rivalry that you might have seem completely unfounded.

Moderator
#4 Posted by Bubbly (253 posts) -

I agree with the article for the most part. A bit of skepticism with stuff like this is never a bad thing. I would like to hear your thoughts on why you think the article is ridiculous. Instead of claiming that they are jealous (which is pretty ridiculous mind you), why don't you tell us what points you agree/disagree with.

#5 Posted by Brodehouse (9848 posts) -

In buying it because it's 100 bucks, it could be c

#6 Edited by Xymox (2082 posts) -

Aren't those the guys who put up a kickstarter to remove advertisements from their website, but then had front-page or full-page ads anyway...? Or am I misinformed?

Either way, it's good to see some pressure coming OUYA's way... Would be nice to know where that 4.3 million is going. Eyes on them, I guess.

Online
#7 Posted by Kidavenger (3530 posts) -

@algertman: Is there anything in the article that you specifically disagree with? what is your point? Ouya is fucking retarded, bravo for someone actually calling them out.

It's too bad Patrick isn't around this week, I'd be very interested to see what he could have dug up on this.

#8 Posted by Brodehouse (9848 posts) -

Urrrrgg fucking why there is no edit function for phones.

I'm buying it because it's 100 bucks, it could be cool, and even if it isn't I can point at it in 20 years and go "Hey you remember this fucking thing?"

#9 Posted by mscupcakes (612 posts) -

Calling this an attack seems like a bit of an overreaction. We've had a thread on here where people have listed most of the same reasons. Just because Penny Arcade happen to have a Kickstarter too doesn't mean they're not allowed come to the same conclusions members of our community have without having some ulterior motive.

#10 Posted by MattyFTM (14367 posts) -

@Xymox said:

Aren't those the guys who put up a kickstarter to remove advertisements from their website, but then had front-page or full-page ads anyway...? Or am I misinformed?

They are the guys who currently have an ongoing kickstarter to try and remove ads from their site. Obviously they can't remove the ads until they reach their goal and the kickstarter ends.

Moderator
#11 Posted by GunslingerPanda (4704 posts) -

I always listen to my favourite unfunny webcomic when I want an opinion on something.

Their readers are mouth-breathing retards; if they don't buy a OUYA, whatever that is, then it will be no great loss to anyone.

#12 Posted by FLStyle (4661 posts) -

@mscupcakes said:

Calling this an attack seems like a bit of an overreaction. We've had a thread on here where people have listed most of the same reasons. Just because Penny Arcade happen to have a Kickstarter too doesn't mean they're not allowed come to the same conclusions members of our community have without having some ulterior motive.

Agreed.

Things like OUYA is why I've yet to give any kickstarter my moneys. I'm keeping an eye on how this and kickstarter as a whole develops over the coming year.

#13 Posted by algertman (852 posts) -

@FLStyle said:

@mscupcakes said:

Calling this an attack seems like a bit of an overreaction. We've had a thread on here where people have listed most of the same reasons. Just because Penny Arcade happen to have a Kickstarter too doesn't mean they're not allowed come to the same conclusions members of our community have without having some ulterior motive.

Agreed.

Things like OUYA is why I've yet to give any kickstarter my moneys. I'm keeping an eye on how this and kickstarter as a whole develops over the coming year.

OUYA is the reason? You mean somebody using KS to fund an actual thing is your problem? What about PA just asking for money? That's all they are doing.

It's clear this an attack on OUYA based on all the money they raised compared to PA wanting a handout to finance their already successful business.

#14 Posted by Aishan (1014 posts) -

@algertman said:

It's clear this an attack on OUYA based on all the money they raised compared to PA wanting a handout to finance their already successful business.

I'm curious, did you actually read the article? If so, why aren't you addressing the points he made, rather than engaging in some weird conspiracy theory?

#15 Posted by BabyChooChoo (4391 posts) -

I think you're blowing this out of proportion...

#16 Edited by OldGuy (1546 posts) -

....well... our from OPs second post it would seem that what we have here is:

...so we're probably done here...

#17 Edited by algertman (852 posts) -

@Aishan said:

@algertman said:

It's clear this an attack on OUYA based on all the money they raised compared to PA wanting a handout to finance their already successful business.

I'm curious, did you actually read the article? If so, why aren't you addressing the points he made, rather than engaging in some weird conspiracy theory?

The article is trash. He goes after it over not having a final controller. Know what else didn't have final controller designs when they were revealed? WiiU and PS3 were the last two I can think of.

Then they have Robert Boyd talk about how he has problems with the system. You know, they guy who made the last Penny Arcade game.

The article is clearly an attack.

#18 Posted by FLStyle (4661 posts) -

@algertman said:

@FLStyle said:

@mscupcakes said:

Calling this an attack seems like a bit of an overreaction. We've had a thread on here where people have listed most of the same reasons. Just because Penny Arcade happen to have a Kickstarter too doesn't mean they're not allowed come to the same conclusions members of our community have without having some ulterior motive.

Agreed.

Things like OUYA is why I've yet to give any kickstarter my moneys. I'm keeping an eye on how this and kickstarter as a whole develops over the coming year.

OUYA is the reason? You mean somebody using KS to fund an actual thing is your problem? What about PA just asking for money? That's all they are doing.

It's clear this an attack on OUYA based on all the money they raised compared to PA wanting a handout to finance their already successful business.

#19 Posted by oldenglishC (944 posts) -
#20 Posted by Hailinel (24394 posts) -

Two words: The Phantom.

Yeah, you remember that? That was another supposed console being developed by an entrepreneur. But all it really was was a means to swindle money out of investors.

#21 Posted by MarvinPontiac (112 posts) -

I think the article comes from a good place and has an interesting perspective, however it complains about how unfinished the thing is, which is unfair. Kickstarter is an investment platform, not an e-store.

#22 Posted by TaliciaDragonsong (8698 posts) -

Ha, I'd back them (in the argument, not with money) but their kickstarter is just as silly.

#23 Posted by theguy (796 posts) -

@OldGuy said:

....well... our from OPs second post it would seem that what we have here is:

...so we're probably done here...

Agreed. You seem very argumentative OP while everyone else is responding discussion style.

#24 Posted by Kidavenger (3530 posts) -

Ouya, the console for games not good enough for other platforms!

Sign me up!

#25 Posted by Cloudenvy (5891 posts) -

@BabyChooChoo said:

I think you're blowing this out of proportion...

Maybe he just loves conspiracy theories!

#26 Edited by Binarynova (150 posts) -

Regardless of whether or not PA makes good points, this is awfully ballsy of them. They've lost all credibility with me, especially with regards to Kickstarter. It's ok for Penny Arcade and Kickstarter get all buddy buddy and agree to ignore Kickstarter's TOS so PA can use Kickstarter for its business expenses, but they're going to pick apart the Ouya?

Also, so much this:

@MarvinPontiac said:

I think the article comes from a good place and has an interesting perspective, however it complains about how unfinished the thing is, which is unfair. Kickstarter is an investment platform, not an e-store.

EDIT: It's not in the ToS. It's in their FAQ.

We know there are a lot of great projects that fall outside of our scope, but Kickstarter is not a place for soliciting donations to causes, charity projects, or general business expenses. Learn more about our project guidelines.

#27 Posted by psylah (2170 posts) -

Yeah, the Ouya is just a terrible idea.

Android games are terrible, and if you want to watch streaming video on your TV there are PLENTY of better options out there that are already available.

#28 Posted by SamStrife (1282 posts) -

I'm convinced this whole Ouya situation is a scam or is going to blow up so badly every investor involved is going to get major pissed off . That article explains a lot of the gripes I have with the machine and whether Penny Arcade are clean of all this Kickstater business is irrelevant; they're doing a good thing by throwing some cold water on this burning pile of hype.

#29 Posted by BabyChooChoo (4391 posts) -

@Cloudenvy said:

@BabyChooChoo said:

I think you're blowing this out of proportion...

Maybe he just loves conspiracy theories!

Then I think his time would be better spent with...

NTSC Regular Edition box art

lol

#30 Posted by BrockNRolla (1702 posts) -

@algertman said:

@Aishan said:

@algertman said:

It's clear this an attack on OUYA based on all the money they raised compared to PA wanting a handout to finance their already successful business.

I'm curious, did you actually read the article? If so, why aren't you addressing the points he made, rather than engaging in some weird conspiracy theory?

The article is trash. He goes after it over not having a final controller. Know what else didn't have final controller designs when they were revealed? WiiU and PS3 were the last two I can think of.

Nintendo and Sony may have shown prototypes initially, but Nintendo and Sony weren't asking you to front them the money to make their console. In fact, neither company accepted money from consumers until they had a complete product.

#31 Posted by Binarynova (150 posts) -

@SamStrife said:

They're doing a good thing by throwing some cold water on this burning pile of hype.

I have to disagree. The Ouya has been funded (over 400% in fact). If it ends up flopping, people will learn the way we learn best: the hard way. It's too late to douse this flame. Writing a long blog post won't actually change anything or help save anyone from making a bad decision. Penny Arcade knows this. This is for publicity.

#32 Posted by mtcantor (947 posts) -

I think it's amazing how many people on these forums are willing to defend a theoretical product by a company with no track record, that no one has played, and which seemingly came out of nowhere all at once.

I think a very heavy dose of very healthy skepticism is proper.

#33 Edited by Binarynova (150 posts) -

@BrockNRolla said:

Nintendo and Sony may have shown prototypes initially, but Nintendo and Sony weren't asking you to front them the money to make their console. In fact, neither company accepted money from consumers until they had a complete product.

The thing is, this is the entire point of practically every Kickstarter venture in the history of ever.

@mtcantor said:

I think a very heavy dose of very healthy skepticism is proper.

Skepticism? Yeah of course it's proper. Not every Kickstarter has been successful. But I think Penny Arcade is the last group of people who should be pointing out questionable Kickstarter practices.

#34 Edited by marcthin (15 posts) -

@Binarynova said:

@SamStrife said:

They're doing a good thing by throwing some cold water on this burning pile of hype.

I have to disagree. The Ouya has been funded (over 400% in fact). If it ends up flopping, people will learn the way we learn best: the hard way. It's too late to douse this flame. Writing a long blog post won't actually change anything or help save anyone from making a bad decision. Penny Arcade knows this. This is for publicity.

Ouyah dont get any of the funds until project listing on KS is over. People who have pitched in to this project can still withdraw until then. So yes, the article can help those people (or anyone new considering donating to the project).

#35 Edited by SamStrife (1282 posts) -

@Binarynova said:

@SamStrife said:

They're doing a good thing by throwing some cold water on this burning pile of hype.

I have to disagree. The Ouya has been funded (over 400% in fact). If it ends up flopping, people will learn the way we learn best: the hard way. It's too late to douse this flame. Writing a long blog post won't actually change anything or help save anyone from making a bad decision. Penny Arcade knows this. This is for publicity.

You're probably right, the fire is way too high for a single bucket of water to quell (I'm loving this metaphor by the way) and if it does flop then people will learn the hard (and as you put it: best) way. However that doesn't mean I want more people to go out and spend money on this kickstarter or get their hopes up for something that, quite frankly, is promising far more than it can hope to deliver.

If this article can calm a few people down over the subject and make them actually understand what they're putting their money into, it's doing a good thing.

#36 Posted by mtcantor (947 posts) -

@Binarynova: Why? Because they are asking for money to take down ads? How is this any different from the Idle Thumbs stuff? They are being entirely straightforward about what they want the money for, and what they will do when they get it. I don't see how this is questionable at all. If anything, I would trust them 100% to follow through on their promise. Its a pretty simple thing, after all.

I just don't see this as motivated by any sort of jealousy or desire to sabotage. Penny-Arcade, and those associated with them have always held strong opinions about the industry. That's all. Not to mention, I think the points they raise are valid.

#37 Posted by BrockNRolla (1702 posts) -

@marcthin said:

@Binarynova said:

@SamStrife said:

They're doing a good thing by throwing some cold water on this burning pile of hype.

I have to disagree. The Ouya has been funded (over 400% in fact). If it ends up flopping, people will learn the way we learn best: the hard way. It's too late to douse this flame. Writing a long blog post won't actually change anything or help save anyone from making a bad decision. Penny Arcade knows this. This is for publicity.

Ouyah dont get any of the funds until project is over. People who have pitched in to this project can still withdraw them until then. So yes, the article can help those people (or anyone new considering donating to the project).

What? They get the money when the kickstarter ends. What happens to the project after that has nothing to do with Kickstarter.

#38 Edited by theManUnknown (166 posts) -

@algertman said:

@FLStyle said:

OUYA is the reason? You mean somebody using KS to fund an actual thing is your problem? What about PA just asking for money? That's all they are doing.

It's clear this an attack on OUYA based on all the money they raised compared to PA wanting a handout to finance their already successful business.

Being reductionistic in assessing a person's motives is never going to be productive. As they themselves have already articulated, Penny Arcade are running their kickstarter as a means of giving their fans the opportunity to support them directly rather than having to deal with the ads on their site. That's all it is: give the fans the opportunity to be the beginning and end of PA's concerns.

If a videogame developer had the option of getting signed on to a major publisher and opted instead to follow the kickstarter model because they didn't want to be beholden to the publisher's wishes but rather wished to only worry about what the fans of the game wanted, I would consider that matter no differently. If fans of PA want to liberate the company from having to worry over "the almighty pageview" (as I believe Tycho put it), they now have that option. If they don't, then it's no big deal, and life goes on.

Consider what might have happened if Gamespot hadn't had to worry about advertising revenue following Gertsmann's review of Kane & Lynch, and you might see how this might not be an entirely trivial or pointless exercise.

Calling the linked article "an attack" is also not constructive, as it similarly reduces what by all appearances seems to me a logically articulated argument. One can point to PA's own kickstarter as somehow giving a motive for Kuchera authoring the article in the first place, but that doesn't magically invalidate any of his points. Indeed, his entire argument could have been articulated by any tech journalist anywhere, and indeed (as others have already stated) many of his points were already discussed on this own forum following the OUYA's announcement.

The fact that completely neutral parties in the matter are still raising the same concerns is all the evidence I need to disregard this already silly notion.

#39 Posted by marcthin (15 posts) -

@BrockNRolla said:

@marcthin said:

@Binarynova said:

@SamStrife said:

They're doing a good thing by throwing some cold water on this burning pile of hype.

I have to disagree. The Ouya has been funded (over 400% in fact). If it ends up flopping, people will learn the way we learn best: the hard way. It's too late to douse this flame. Writing a long blog post won't actually change anything or help save anyone from making a bad decision. Penny Arcade knows this. This is for publicity.

Ouyah dont get any of the funds until project is over. People who have pitched in to this project can still withdraw them until then. So yes, the article can help those people (or anyone new considering donating to the project).

What? They get the money when the kickstarter ends. What happens to the project after that has nothing to do with Kickstarter.

Yep, thats what I meant. "Project" as in project on kickstarter.

#40 Posted by BrockNRolla (1702 posts) -

@Binarynova said:

@SamStrife said:

They're doing a good thing by throwing some cold water on this burning pile of hype.

I have to disagree. The Ouya has been funded (over 400% in fact). If it ends up flopping, people will learn the way we learn best: the hard way.

I take issue with your proposition because it implies that people learn.

#41 Edited by JeanLuc (3579 posts) -

I think this article brings up some good points. I don't have anything against the idea of the OUYA but to trust it completely and give them money is a bad idea. They have to earn my trust and prove to me that they really have what they are trying to sell. The Phantom is the perfect example of getting burned on a product trying to sell a dream idea. Yet we also have OnLive. Remember when that was first announced? Everyone thought is was a scam and would never work, but it actually does. Not perfectly mind you but it does do what they said it would.

My point is its ok to get excited about a cool idea but its important to not get swept up it the marketing and look at it for what it really is. This PA article isn't trying to attack but inform.

#42 Edited by Zelyre (1173 posts) -

@psylah said:

Yeah, the Ouya is just a terrible idea.

Android games are terrible, and if you want to watch streaming video on your TV there are PLENTY of better options out there that are already available.

But a $99 piece of hardware that can emulate games from the PSX era on down perfectly that can also serve as an XBMC box that outputs at 1080p that's perfectly silent while sipping power compared to even the greenest of HTPCs? While there are other ways of displaying media, streamed or not on your TV, I still think that XBMC is king.

A cheap web server? This box should excite anyone with the creativity and the technical know how to get the job done; if the hardware comes out.

I can't imagine more than a handful of people that have put money in to the kickstarter are actually buying this for its advertised purpose.

The Ouya as a hardware platform is an incredible idea.

The Ouya as a advertised now is doomed to obscurity at the best, failure realistically, and the project that single handedly kills Kickstarter when the Ouya ends up being vaporware at the worst.

#43 Edited by Binarynova (150 posts) -

@marcthin said:

People who have pitched in to this project can still withdraw them until then.

I'll admit I wasn't aware of that. I was under the assumption that meeting the goal signified the end.

@SamStrife said:

However that doesn't mean I want more people to go out and spend money on this kickstarter or get their hopes up for something that, quite frankly, is promising far more than it can hope to deliver.

If this article can calm a few people down over the subject and make them actually understand what they're putting their money into, it's doing a good thing.

Fair enough. Though I think that, given the specs, the Ouya is well within the realm of possibility.

@mtcantor said:

@Binarynova: Why? Because they are asking for money to take down ads? How is this any different from the Idle Thumbs stuff? They are being entirely straightforward about what they want the money for, and what they will do when they get it. I don't see how this is questionable at all. If anything, I would trust them 100% to follow through on their promise. Its a pretty simple thing, after all.

The Kickstarter Terms of Service specify that Kickstarter shouldn't be used for general business expenses. If you're removing the ads from your site, and still need to pay for hosting, those are general business expenses. My problem is that Kickstarter bent over backwards to ignore its own ToS in this case. Probably because of the popularity of Penny Arcade, the assumption that it would be successful, and the possible result of making Kickstarter more money.

EDIT: It's not in the terms of service, that I can see. It's in their FAQ.

We know there are a lot of great projects that fall outside of our scope, but Kickstarter is not a place for soliciting donations to causes, charity projects, or general business expenses. Learn more about our project guidelines.

#44 Posted by SamStrife (1282 posts) -

@Zelyre said:

The Ouya as a hardware platform is an incredible idea.

The Ouya as a advertised now is doomed to obscurity at the best, failure realistically, and the project that singlehandedly kills Kickstarter when the Ouya ends up being vaporware at the worst.

This is the smartest thing I've read about the project so far, well done.

#45 Posted by mtcantor (947 posts) -

@Binarynova: Where does it say this? Can't find that language anywhere.

#46 Posted by Binarynova (150 posts) -

@BrockNRolla said:

@Binarynova said:

I have to disagree. The Ouya has been funded (over 400% in fact). If it ends up flopping, people will learn the way we learn best: the hard way.

I take issue with your proposition because it implies that people learn.

*lol* Call me an optimist. :p

#47 Posted by Kidavenger (3530 posts) -

@Gamasutra said:

Yesterday the OUYA Android-based game console became the most successful Kickstarter campaign of all time.

One look at their Kickstarter video pitch, and you can see why people were so willing to "invest".

The pitch pushes all the right buttons for gamers. The OUYA creators claim to take the value of a good gamepad very seriously.

They claim their console will be "open" and "hackable". So not only will you get to play all those innovative games the big bad publishers crowd out of normal console space, but you can probably get them for free (if you have more technical knowhow than ethics).

The pitch includes fleeting glimpses of games that will resonate with hardcore gamers such as Minecraft and Gears of War clone Shadowgun. The console's main interface features a game that looks suspiciously like Street Fighter 4. Their fancy App-store looks like a refactored Xbox Live.

Finally, their offices look state of the art, and the talking heads seem experienced and knowledagable. Except the main speaker seems to say the word "television" a disturbing amount of time, as if she's harkening back to a bygone age when the whole family crowded around a 13 inch Magnivox.

That's where the uneasiness sets in. I started to get the feeling that these people are in over their heads. The more I learned about their plan, the more doubt and suspicions I had.

I came up with this list of seven reasons why the OUYA is at the very least, a bad idea.

1. The Android Game Library is Barely Compatible with the OUYA.

How many existing Android games will play well with this thing, out of the box? Very few. Android games were made for smart phones, and virtually all of them rely on a specific type of touch screen control that can't be easily emulated by the track pad on the OUYA gamepad.

Android phones only register input when the user presses the screen. There's no full-time mouse cursor, like you get on a laptop. Instead, you just tap your finger on the game object you want to interact with. Without the screen to touch, this system falls apart.

Even if OUYA were to simulate a hovering finger by overlaying a full-time cursor over the game screen, you'd still need to press a gamepad button to simulate the actual finger touch. Of course, you'll be doing all of this with a trackpad on the gamepad's surface. No matter how you cut it, this will be an inferior experience to simply playing the game on a smart phone.

2. The Android Game Library is Extremely Lackluster

Even if there were no control issues, nothing on Android comes close to providing an experience like Assasin's Creed: Brotherhood or Gears of War 3.

There's not even a game of comparable quality to Shadow Complex or a Limbo on Android. Yet these games, and hundreds of other AAA titles currently exist on consoles that can be purchased for $100, and sometimes less.

A lot of them can also be found on Windows 7. So why didn't the OUYA team base their console on that? Because then players could easily bypass the OUYA app-store and buy their games on Steam, cutting out OUYA's profits.

But what about Linux? There are already a number of great console-quality games that run on Linux. Hey, there's even a version of Minecraft on Linux that's not the bastardized 'play-as-you-go' version found on Android.

A linux-based system could feature the OUYA app-store as a front-end, lock the user out of the broader OS, and still retain compatibility with tons of great games.

It seems that someone on the OUYA team was misinformed. Maybe they looked at the volume of new Android titles per month vs. the volume of Linux titles per month, and decided that more games = better.

3. Indies Will Not Fill the Void

Again, part of the pitch is that, unlike current console development, development for OUYA is open to everyone. Let the flood of AAA indies begin!

Except the open environment scenario already exists on PC, and most of the brightest indies find their way to consoles anyway. Look at Spelunky, Minecraft, Cave Story, World of Goo, etc.

So who are these magical indie developers who aren't on Steam, Desura, or Xbox Live, and yet, will come out of the woodwork to produce OUYA titles that can compete with the big names on other consoles?

They don't exist.

People who do exist are the hacks who are responsible for the 99 cent garbage you see flooding the iPhone and Android app stores. They'll be happy to flood the OUYA store with their slapped-together-in-a-week junk.

4. The Userbase Problem

The problem with launching a console is one of the chicken and the egg.

People won't buy a new console unless it has great games. Developers won't invest the time and money to make games unless the console has a large install-base.

This is why launching a new console from the ground up is so ridiculously expensive. Microsoft spent over $500 million on the Kinect's launch alone. It spent far more when it launched the original Xbox.

The only way to convince big-name developers to make content for a system without a large install-base is to make them believe there will be a large install base in the near future. This is why a mammoth marketing budget is needed, one that dwarfs that of your average hollywood movie.

Nintendo couldn't get Sega Sports to keep making games for the Gamecube after the first couple years because of a small userbase, and they're Nintendo.

Sega couldn't make the console business work despite decades of experience and owning some of the biggest IP's in the business.

5. Some Things Just Don't Scale

So maybe the OUYA won't be as big as the Xbox or Playstation. So what? It can still be a small-scale success, right? No.

The problem is that certain aspects of a console don't scale like that. For instance, how is the online play going to work? Building and maintaining something like Xbox Live took a tremendous amount of money and years of work.

The amount of work would have been pretty much the same had the user base been only 1/10th the size.

To get a feel for how difficult it is to create something like Xbox Live, just look at the competing services offered by Nintendo and Sony. Nintendo would like to have something as capable, smooth, and stable as Microsoft's offering, but it's not worth the investment to them.

Nintendo did the math and saw that the hardcore portion of the Wii userbase wasn't large enough to invest the money into making a fully-featured online matchmaking service.

In other words, something like Xbox Live is only economically feasible if the user base is large.

6. Games are Moving Away From the TV

The OUYA Kickstarter pitch opens with the revelation that videogaming is moving away from the television and toward personal devices like laptops, smartphones, and tablets. It's a curious way to start a pitch for a home gaming console.

The presenter is right, though. The living room television is becoming less and less a part of people's lives. Right now I own three portable devices that I watch television shows on: laptop, smart phone, and tablet (a gift). I haven't had a cable subscription for years.

Nintendo's portable systems (DS and 3DS) almost always outsell their console counterparts. An Ipad was the most requested toy last Christmas, higher on kids' lists than any home console.

It seems Nintendo noticed this shift when it designed the Wii U console, with its screen-on-a-controller.

Sony also seemed to get the message. Its Vita marketing campaign was based on the idea of taking your console game with you on the go.

The OUYA seems to be going the other direction, taking a portable platform and grounding it to a television. I guess the desire to see Canabalt running on a 60 inch LCD was just too strong to resist.

7. Android Specs Move too Fast

Finally, tying the system to a particular Android spec is a recipe for disaster. This was one of the biggest problems with the Sony Play gamepad/smartphone. It was designed based on an Android spec that was obsolete by the time the system launched.

The OUYA has similar specs to the Asus Nexus 7 Android tablet. The Nexus 7 is at least twice as fast as the fastest Android tablet that existed two years ago. It's a safe bet that we'll have something twice as fast as that two years from now.

What this means is that the OUYA will have trouble running high end Android games by the time it hits the 2 year mark.

Phantom Part Two?

A lot of people are comparing the OUYA to the never-released Phantom game console. But while the Phantom's creators ripped off sophisticated big-money investors, the OUYA has so far recieved $2.3 million in "investments" from the naive general public.

I can only hope the OUYA people do intend to make good on their promises, rather than just taking the money and running. Either way, the result will be the same for those unfortunate souls who threw good money at this thing.

http://gamasutra.com/blogs/IanFisch/20120711/173901/OUYA_the_Android_console__naivete_at_work.php

#48 Posted by Binarynova (150 posts) -

@mtcantor said:

@Binarynova: Where does it say this? Can't find that language anywhere.

My apologies, it's not in the ToS. It's in their FAQs.

"We know there are a lot of great projects that fall outside of our scope, but Kickstarter is not a place for soliciting donations to causes, charity projects, or general business expenses. Learn more about our project guidelines."

#49 Posted by theManUnknown (166 posts) -

@Binarynova said:

@mtcantor said:

@Binarynova: Where does it say this? Can't find that language anywhere.

My apologies, it's not in the ToS. It's in their FAQs.

"We know there are a lot of great projects that fall outside of our scope, but Kickstarter is not a place for soliciting donations to causes, charity projects, or general business expenses. Learn more about our project guidelines."

I wouldn't call PA asking for general business expenses, considering they're trying to change their entire business model and fund numerous creative projects in the process.

#50 Posted by mtcantor (947 posts) -

@Binarynova: Well hell, that's true then. This does seem to violate Kickstarter's rules. Interesting that Kickstarted doesn't seem to care. I mean, they can just change their own rules whenever though, so I guess it doesn't matter.

Anyhow, I think Penny Arcade has proven themselves time and time again over the years to not be totally evil assholes. I don't see why this justified criticism of this kinda sketchy product is all of a sudden evidence of their nefariousness.