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#1 Edited by Carryboy (589 posts) -

Hey Duders,

Can I rather selfishly ask for some books recommendations, I have read very few books in my time as I usually just watch the tv/movie adaption however if you still think its worth reading some stuff having seen the movie let me know.

My only 2 genres im not interested in are Autobiographies and period dramas.

Many thanks in advance.

#3 Posted by Nightriff (4348 posts) -

Fight Club, great movie and book

#4 Edited by egg (1339 posts) -

The Heretics/Unpersuadables

by Will Storr

#5 Edited by Capum15 (4572 posts) -

I read the Hobbit and am a bit over half through The Fellowship of the Ring and I love 'em. I tried reading the LOTR trilogy when I was pretty young and it never managed to hold my attention, but now I can barely stop reading.

Also, World War Z is my favorite zombie book. I haven't seen the movie but it seems that they took out enough of what I liked about the book to make me not interested.

If you're interested in World War II, Gerald Astor has a good bunch of books. The Mighty Eighth, June 6th, 1944 - The Voices of D-Day, and A Blood-Dimmed Tide are all great.

#6 Posted by Morningstar (2049 posts) -

The Name Of The Wind.

#7 Posted by newhaap (409 posts) -

The Discworld series by Terry Pratchett if fantasy comedy sounds like something you would enjoy. You'll find characters like a wizard that doesn't know how to cast spells or even spell the word wizard, a good witch that has to be good because someone else already took the part of the bad witch, and a grim reaper that sometimes just cares too much, to name a few. There are tons of them now but the first book in the series is titled The Colour of Magic.

#8 Posted by PenguinDust (12414 posts) -

Otherland by Tad Williams. It's a cyber/matrix like story but it's far more epic and the characters are quite diverse. There are 4 books in the series each running about 800 pages.

#9 Edited by BackupPanic (110 posts) -

The Millennium Trilogy by Stieg Larsson, perhaps my favorite modern series, with a fantastic pair of protagonists to boot.

And certainly, the entirety of the Sherlock Holmes fiction by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is worth checking out, if you're not opposed to reading older stuff.

#10 Posted by alwaysbebombing (1281 posts) -

How an Economy Grows and Why it Crashes

by Peter D. Schiff

#11 Posted by ILikePopCans (713 posts) -

Yo dog do you like Eragon?

#12 Edited by Poonz (103 posts) -

I'm a big fan of Stephen King, pick any of the classics and enjoy.

Here's a couple:

The Stand

IT

Dark Tower Series

Salem's Lot

The Shining

Lot's of really good books by him.

#13 Posted by ProfessorK (797 posts) -

Goosebumps dawg, take your pick.

#14 Posted by Legion_ (1208 posts) -

I'm knee-deep in Moby Dick at the moment. Fantastic piece of litterature.

#15 Posted by White (1143 posts) -

Read Japanese Light Novels if you enjoy their style of lovey-dovey humour and weird writing styles. Translated of course. If you're interested, I can recommend a couple of series to start with.

#16 Posted by wrecks (2125 posts) -
#17 Edited by Belegorm (284 posts) -

The Last of the Mohicans is a good old classic novel about American colonial days. The Bourne Identity (and its two sequels) is a fun novel as well, better than the movie but similar.

If you want to read something to make yourself smarter, I'd recommend trying Plato's Republic. Good work to take a cursory look at philosophy.

#18 Posted by Killerfridge (289 posts) -

Horns- Joe Hill (Really, very good book with some beautifully written scenes and characters)

Making History- Stephen Fry (A very clever, very interesting look at the consequences of changing history. A very funny novel as well)

City of Thieves- David Benioff (Very "readable")

Killing Floor- Lee Child (Start of the Jack Reacher series, a seriously addictive character. I'd suggest you read them in order, but you don't have to)

The Name of the Wind- Patrick Rothfuss (Great fantasy)

Misery- Stephen King (One of his best IMO)

The Devotion of Suspect X- Keigo Higashino (One of the only books I read in one sitting)

The Blade Itself- Joe Abercrombie (Again, really good fantasy. This one has fantastic characters)

Nada- Carmen Laforet (Bit different from the others here but a very important Spanish post civil war novel. I enjoyed it)

Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy- Douglas Adams (Brilliant book, brilliant series. Very funny)

All I loved all these books. Someone also mentioned Discworld. I'd recommend that, they're so very funny and incredibly clever. Here's the recommended reading order; Most people don't reccomend to read them in the published order. If you want more, I'd be more than happy to give you more recommendations.

http://www.lspace.org/books/reading-order-guides/the-discworld-reading-order-guide-20.jpg

#19 Posted by Sinusoidal (1155 posts) -

Dive in head-fucking-first. Steven Erikson wrote an awesome decalogy (ten books) - about 1000 pages each - called the "Malazan Book of the Fallen". The best epic fantasy in existence. Martin's "Song of Ice and Fire"!? Pshaw! Martin writes soap opera by comparison.

They're incredibly dense: the kind of books you'll find yourself re-reading entire chapters of because you didn't catch everything the first time around. I've read them all at least a couple of times each, and I still don't see the entire picture, but it's mind-blowingly awesome even in bits. Erikson does atmosphere and world-building better than any fantasy writer ever has.

I also really, really enjoy Peter Hamilton. The Night's Dawn trilogy - another set of three 1000+ page doorstops - is very much worth a read. Though I like some of his other stuff better. Most people seem to prefer this one. He writes a kind of incredibly epic space opera that's occasionally quite ridiculous, but always extremely entertaining.

#20 Posted by Guesty_01 (339 posts) -

Anything by Joe Abercrobie, starting with The First Law trilogy, and more specifically The Blade Itself.

#21 Posted by Muttinus_Rump (814 posts) -

Hyperion. Best sci-fi book I've read other than Neuromancer.

#22 Edited by White_Silhouette (468 posts) -

I am really in to the Dresden files series by Jim Butcher. Also I do enjoy the Iron Druid Chronicles.

#23 Posted by MeatsofEvil (25 posts) -

I haven't read too many books, probably only around 5 since i was a kid (which i seriously regret) but I recently started listening to audio books at work since i don't have decent chunks of time to sit down and read. Though the quality of audio books always depend on how well the narrator reads the stories, I feel it really is a great way to experience a lot of books.

Here's what I've listened to (It's all horror stuff so take that for what it's worth):

The Stand by Stephen King ( My very first Stephen King book, and my god it is so incredibly good)

Salem's Lot by Stephen King (An awesome vampire story, told in a very interesting way)

It by Stephen King (duh :p)

The Dunwich Horror by H.P Lovecraft (my favorite, such great detail and storytelling)

The Call of Cthulu by H.P Lovecraft (not my favorite, but still seeping with detail)

The Shadow Over Innsmouth by H.P Lovecraft (very cool story, that gets pretty exciting in the second half)

Dagon by H.P Lovecraft (very short but still worth the read)

14 by Peter Clines (an interesting premise from the start, but will turn you for an incredible loop in the second half, and if I had a physical copy i wouldn't have been able to put it down)

The Books of Blood by Clive Barker (some seriously dark stuff, but wow some of the stories are awesome)

#24 Edited by Random45 (807 posts) -

I have two trilogies you might be inerested in:

The Mistborn trilogy takes places in an alternate world where the sky is red and it's always raining ash, and there are two classes of citizens - the nobles, and the Skaa. Skaa are pretty much treated as slaves, and their lives just SUCK, and they can't do anything about it because the Lord Ruler (Yeah, fruity name, I know), keeps order with the Steel Inquisitors, which are basically men who have spikes nailed into their eyes and all over their bodies and are intimidating as hell. Anyway, in addition to this, there's eight different types of magic, each attached to a certain metal that only a very few amount of people have. Tin enhances the senses, Brass increases your strength twenty-fold, etc. However even rarer is the Mistborn, a person capable of using all eight metals. Basically the story follows a character named Vin who's a Mistborn, and also happens to be Skaa, as she joins a group of people in an attempt to overthrow the Lord Ruler's reign.

The second trilogy is Night Angel - it's not anywhere near as good as Mistborn I think, but it's worth a try. It follows a young kid named Azoth who wants to become what this world considers an assassin. A lot of things happen, and he soon finds himself talking with Durzo Blint - the most famous assassin there is, and he attempts to get him to take him in as an apprentice. Suffice to say, since it's a trilogy, a LOT of stuff happens.

Both trilogies have a lot of fun characters, and they are some of my favorite books.

If you don't care about characters much, you can also read A Song of Ice and Fire, since I guarantee that your favorite character will die over, and over, and over, and over again. Seriously though, it's a fantastic series, but I don't really care for how often characters come and go, and good luck remembering who's who on your first time through.

#25 Edited by pyromagnestir (3962 posts) -

Recommendations? Don't mind if I do!

Well if you have any interest in conspiracy theories and all that sort of stuff Foucault's Pendulum is a pretty great book. It's about three very intelligent and very bored editors at a vanity publishing company who deal with a lot of nuts publishing conspiracy stuff, about Knights Templar and holy artifacts and all that assassin's creed shit, plus the occult, who decide to write their own grand unifying conspiracy theory for fun and sell it to the nuts. But shit starts to go bad when the nuts buy into the new conspiracies and the editors themselves get too caught up in the events which follow. Though I suppose I should warn you that it's not exactly a light and simple book, it's written by Umberto Eco, whose novels at times seem to be history books in disguise. I like them, but I appreciate them more when the occasional historical info dump is about a topic I am actually interested in, which was often the case in Foucault's Pendulum, but not so much in The Name of The Rose which was a really good book about a Sherlock Holmes-ish monk investigating a murder in an abbey in the 1300's that would occasionally veer off into a discussion about the schism in the church between the Franciscan and Dominican orders. Not my cup of tea, but I still enjoyed the book.

I am currently reading House of Leaves, and it has seemed pretty damn cool so far. It's a horror novel that's a bit different from your usual book. It's about a documentarian/journalist who moves into a new home with his family only to discover there is a massive, dark labyrinth within it, which isn't there at first but grows out of what began as an ordinary hallway. What makes it different from the usual book is how it's formatted in such a way that the actual physical book itself is almost a prop being used to help tell a story rather than a mere collection of the words which make up the story. It reminds me a lot of the writings of Jorge Luis Borges, whose short story collection Ficciones I also highly recommend.

Player of Games and Use of Weapons by Iain M Banks (who sadly passed away earlier this year) are really good scifi novels from his culture series, set in a far flung future where AI does most of the dirty work and most of the humans or aliens can pretty much live lives of leisure. When they're not at war with each other, that is. And they often are.

Blindsight by Peter Watts is about a future where vampires were discovered to be an actual offshoot of the human race, they were brilliant, far more intelligent than humans, but also sociopathic and canabalistic. They died out around the time humans started to become more civilized and form large communities since the vampires were loners and all that. However humans use genes to bring them back, a la Jurassic Park, to take advantage of their brilliance, and made some slight modifications to keep them from being too much of a threat. Then an alien ship shows up and everyone starts to panic. A team of specialists and led by a Vampire is sent to investigate.

The A Song of Ice and Fire novels, starting with A Game of Thrones, are really fucking good.

Neal Stephenson is a really fun writer. His books are filled with lots of nerdy stuff and also very smart. Cryptonomicon and Snow Crash are probably the best but Anathem is really good too.

The Terror by Dan Simmons is a horror novel about what happened to a couple ships that get trapped in the ice while looking for the northwest passage in the mid 1800's.

The Winter King, Enemy of God and Excalibur by Bernard Cornwell are a more down to earth take on the legend of King Arthur.

And I guess that's enough for now.

#26 Posted by ch3burashka (4907 posts) -

Instead of recommending you read The Republic or Finnegan's Wake or The Lord of the Rings or other dumb shit, I have two recommendations:

The Third Policeman by Flann O'Brien (pen name of Brian O'Nolan)

The Dream of Perpetual Motion by Dexter Palmer

Read those, then get back to me.

#27 Posted by OneLoneClone (39 posts) -

@muttinus_rump: Hyperion is truly excellent, agreed. Also recently really enjoyed The Windup Girl.

#28 Posted by MonetaryDread (1955 posts) -

Republic Lost by Lawrence Lessig is a briliant book about the current political situation in the United States (it was facinating read, even for a non-american like myself).

Reading Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy is like experiencing a master class in the english language. Easily the best piece of fiction I have ever read.

#29 Posted by TheDoorman (532 posts) -

I highly recommend 1984 by George Orwell, one of my favorite books of all time. Might be a little tough to get into at first and a lot of information to digest but when it all comes together your just like "Whoa"

Some other titles as well, Slaughterhouse 5 by Kurt Vonnegut, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, Maze Runner series

Someone also mentioned Fight Club, which is a great movie but even better book: "It is only once you've lost everything that your free to do anything" remains one of my favorite quotes and is from that book.

#30 Posted by lclay (382 posts) -

Joe Abercrombie's First Law Trilogy is probably my favourite series ever; it's already been mentioned a few times in this thread. It's goddamn fantastic.

Mistborn trilogy by Brandon Sanderson is also brilliant.

#31 Edited by Carryboy (589 posts) -

Holy crap that was more replies then I was expecting...

@nightriff said:

Fight Club, great movie and book

Really liked the movie, havent seen it in years which would probably help so Ill give that a shot.

@egg said:

The Heretics/Unpersuadables

by Will Storr

Huh, they look pretty interesting thank you.

@capum15 said:

I read the Hobbit and am a bit over half through The Fellowship of the Ring and I love 'em. I tried reading the LOTR trilogy when I was pretty young and it never managed to hold my attention, but now I can barely stop reading.

Also, World War Z is my favorite zombie book. I haven't seen the movie but it seems that they took out enough of what I liked about the book to make me not interested.

If you're interested in World War II, Gerald Astor has a good bunch of books. The Mighty Eighth, June 6th, 1944 - The Voices of D-Day, and A Blood-Dimmed Tide are all great.

I am considering the hobbit and LOTR, Ive seen the movies but and this point I might just wait till there done with the Hobbit movies and then read the books. I have just seen World War Z and actually thought the movie was OK so ill give the book a go.

@morningstar said:

The Name Of The Wind.

was looking pretty good untill I saw the picture of the author (im a horrible person.)

@newhaap said:

The Discworld series by Terry Pratchett if fantasy comedy sounds like something you would enjoy. You'll find characters like a wizard that doesn't know how to cast spells or even spell the word wizard, a good witch that has to be good because someone else already took the part of the bad witch, and a grim reaper that sometimes just cares too much, to name a few. There are tons of them now but the first book in the series is titled The Colour of Magic.

Ill look into these thanks, im really quite picky on comedy though.

@backuppanic said:

The Millennium Trilogy by Stieg Larsson, perhaps my favorite modern series, with a fantastic pair of protagonists to boot.

And certainly, the entirety of the Sherlock Holmes fiction by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is worth checking out, if you're not opposed to reading older stuff.

Yeh ok ill go for some of that, but I cannot get behind Sherlock Holmes.

@ilikepopcans said:

Yo dog do you like Eragon?

More like eragonE amirite? (played the game and that put me off anything with that name attached)

@poonz said:

I'm a big fan of Stephen King, pick any of the classics and enjoy.

Here's a couple:

The Stand

IT

Dark Tower Series

Salem's Lot

The Shining

Lot's of really good books by him.

Yes ok great I should read some Stephen King you are 100% correct thank you.

@professork said:

Goosebumps dawg, take your pick.

So whilst I haven't read many books I've read hella goosebumps dawg.

@legion_ said:

I'm knee-deep in Moby Dick at the moment. Fantastic piece of litterature.

I think weve all been knee deep in moby dick at some point in our lives, you know what im saying?

@belegorm said:

The Last of the Mohicans is a good old classic novel about American colonial days. The Bourne Identity (and its two sequels) is a fun novel as well, better than the movie but similar.

If you want to read something to make yourself smarter, I'd recommend trying Plato's Republic. Good work to take a cursory look at philosophy.

I like philosophy :)

@random45 said:

I have two trilogies you might be inerested in:

The Mistborn trilogy takes places in an alternate world where the sky is red and it's always raining ash, and there are two classes of citizens - the nobles, and the Skaa. Skaa are pretty much treated as slaves, and their lives just SUCK, and they can't do anything about it because the Lord Ruler (Yeah, fruity name, I know), keeps order with the Steel Inquisitors, which are basically men who have spikes nailed into their eyes and all over their bodies and are intimidating as hell. Anyway, in addition to this, there's eight different types of magic, each attached to a certain metal that only a very few amount of people have. Tin enhances the senses, Brass increases your strength twenty-fold, etc. However even rarer is the Mistborn, a person capable of using all eight metals. Basically the story follows a character named Vin who's a Mistborn, and also happens to be Skaa, as she joins a group of people in an attempt to overthrow the Lord Ruler's reign.

The second trilogy is Night Angel - it's not anywhere near as good as Mistborn I think, but it's worth a try. It follows a young kid named Azoth who wants to become what this world considers an assassin. A lot of things happen, and he soon finds himself talking with Durzo Blint - the most famous assassin there is, and he attempts to get him to take him in as an apprentice. Suffice to say, since it's a trilogy, a LOT of stuff happens.

Both trilogies have a lot of fun characters, and they are some of my favorite books.

If you don't care about characters much, you can also read A Song of Ice and Fire, since I guarantee that your favorite character will die over, and over, and over, and over again. Seriously though, it's a fantastic series, but I don't really care for how often characters come and go, and good luck remembering who's who on your first time through.

Haha they sound cool, I am watching game of thrones on TV, how different are the books?

#32 Edited by tourgen (4238 posts) -

@carryboy: No autos or period dramas huh, .... how about Anabasis?

#33 Posted by Flacracker (1391 posts) -

The Count of Monte Cristo - Unabridged = Best book ever

#34 Posted by Killerfridge (289 posts) -

@carryboy: If you don't wanna read The Name of the Wind because you saw a picture of the author, you won't wanna read A Game of Thrones.

#35 Posted by Video_Game_King (34613 posts) -

Counter Culture Through The Ages is a pretty interesting read.

#36 Posted by SunBroZak (843 posts) -

Robopocalypse.

#37 Edited by Carryboy (589 posts) -

@carryboy: If you don't wanna read The Name of the Wind because you saw a picture of the author, you won't wanna read A Game of Thrones.

Hahaha I havent seen a picture yet :)

#38 Posted by Capum15 (4572 posts) -

@carryboy: The book is pretty different from the movie from what I can tell. Slow zombies, documentary-ish (multiple people recounting their experiences).

I'll probably see the movie some time though; it seems fine.

#39 Edited by TheManWithNoPlan (4445 posts) -

Lately I've been reading Ready player one, The Hitchhiker's guide to the Galaxy and At the Mountains of Madness. All of which I wholly recommend.

#40 Posted by Posharoo (20 posts) -

The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz and Motherless Brooklyn by Jonathan Lethem. I guarantee enjoyment.

#41 Edited by Aegon (5117 posts) -
  • Name of The Wind
  • Way of Kings
  • Blood Song
  • Game of Thrones
  • Shadow in Summer

Also, the author of Name of the Wind might look all serious in pictures but he's actually a pretty cheery guy. Here's an interview with him:

#42 Posted by ch3burashka (4907 posts) -

Yo dog do you like Eragon?

Not a fan of how that ended. IF ONLY HE COULD FEEL ALL THE FEELS AT ONCE

#43 Edited by BaneFireLord (2878 posts) -

Anything by Jim Butcher (The Dresden Files, Codex Alera) and Neil Gaiman (American Gods is probably the best fantasy book I have ever had the pleasure to read).

#44 Edited by NFLD (28 posts) -

The Road is the book your looking for. Best book written this century, real literature. If you fancy yourself an advanced reader then. Blood Meridian could not be recommend more. It blows new readers minds and sparks life long interest in literature. Full of hidden meaning its part American epic part fever dream. It will stick with you long after you read it. Also someone put up Moby-Dick which is great but you really need to focus and break the old language to get into it. A lot of third rate science fiction and fantasy books being mentioned. My opinion don't waste time on any of them, video games scratch that itch. If your going to read then go with the classics.

#45 Posted by PatODay (135 posts) -

The Regulators by Richard Bachman (a pen name used by Stephen King)

Angelfall by Susan Ee

The Song of Ice & Fire series is just fantastic.

#46 Edited by JadeGL (613 posts) -

House of Leaves is great. Fantastic book and I would highly recommend it.

The Prestige by Christopher Priest is also fantastic. It's a strange combination of period piece and science fiction. I didn't love it as much as the movie, but it also answers some questions that the movie kind of left up for interpretation (I feel) and it also has a very different feel overall and ending.

#47 Posted by mlarrabee (2760 posts) -

The Edge of Danger - Margaret C. Scoggin

The Man Who Was Thursday - G. K. Chesterton

The Art of War - Sun-tzu

1984 and Animal Farm - George Orwell

Kidnapped - Robert Louis Stevenson

Out of the Silent Planet - C. S. Lewis

The Elements of Style - William Strunk Jr. and E. B. White

The Sherlock Holmes stories and books - Sir A. Conan Doyle

#48 Posted by Rejizzle (184 posts) -

Like Science Fiction? Foundation by Asimov and Childhood's End by Clark are the definitive science fiction classic novels for me. If you want a bit o WTF with your science fiction I recommend Slaughterhouse Five by Vonnegut or Ubik by P.K. Dick. Anything by those four authors really.

#49 Posted by xaLieNxGrEyx (2579 posts) -

Anything that says Cormac McCarthy under Author

#50 Posted by Humanity (7961 posts) -

@carryboy: Neuromancer by William Gibson.

When you read it be aware that the guy wrote it in 1982 I think.. early 80's anyway. It's wild.