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#151 Posted by Example1013 (4834 posts) -

It's a cultural thing. Culture in the northeast generates tons of assholes. The northeast is also one of the more well-off sections of the country, so a lot of people have enough money to travel abroad. So it's not really Americans, so much as New England Assholes who have given the US a bad name.

#152 Posted by Veiasma (194 posts) -

@Example1013 said:

It's a cultural thing. Culture in the northeast generates tons of assholes. The northeast is also one of the more well-off sections of the country, so a lot of people have enough money to travel abroad. So it's not really Americans, so much as New England Assholes who have given the US a bad name.

Ah yes, MASSholes. Living in Massachusetts is not a requirement to be a Masshole.

#153 Posted by Example1013 (4834 posts) -

@Veiasma said:

@Example1013 said:

It's a cultural thing. Culture in the northeast generates tons of assholes. The northeast is also one of the more well-off sections of the country, so a lot of people have enough money to travel abroad. So it's not really Americans, so much as New England Assholes who have given the US a bad name.

Ah yes, MASSholes. Living in Massachusetts is not a requirement to be a Masshole.

Most people don't realize that the proper way for an outsider to greet someone in New England is by saying "Can I ask you for the time or should I just go fuck myself?"

#154 Edited by Still_I_Cry (2494 posts) -

@Vegetable_Side_Dish said:

@Still_I_Cry said:

the excuse for when Democrats had the majority?)

The 'excuse' is three-fold:

1. While democrats had a majority, there were a number (somewhere around 10-15) 'Blue Dogs' - Democrats voted in with a far more conservative slant to their policy than normal.

2. Filibusters: http://newsjunkiepost.com/2010/03/02/republican-obstruction-at-work-record-number-of-filibusters/
http://www.thedailybeast.com/cheats/2010/03/01/gop-set-to-triple-filibuster-record.html

How bad is GOP obstructionism in the Senate? Republican senators are on pace to more than triple the previous record for uses of a filibuster in a Congress. In 2009, there were a record 112 cloture votes (the number of cloture votes is how you measure the use of filibusters). So far in 2010, there have already been more than 40 cloture votes. The previous record was in 1995-1996, when the Republican-controlled Senate required 50 cloture votes.

3. Lastly , and most significantly, money. I mean, I don't even need to give you the hoards of evidence and articles about this, because I remember one figure from one article. http://money.cnn.com/2009/09/08/news/economy/health_care_lobbying/index.htm

WASHINGTON (CNNMoney.com) -- The fight over health care overhaul is on track to be the most expensive issue ever to hit the hallways of Congress.

The bill for lobbyists, television ads and political donations has topped $375 million -- or enough to pay the entire insurance tab for about 30,000 families a year.

The big spenders range from drug companies, hospitals and doctor groups to organizations that advocate for unions, immigrants and retirees.

The largest chunk has gone to direct lobbying of lawmakers and other policymakers. In the first half of 2009, the health care industry spent nearly $280 million on lobbyists, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.

The lobbying figures alone are on track to exceed half-a-billion-dollar mark by the end of the year, which would be a record.
$500 million, spent ONLY on lobbying, ONLY on one issue, in ONLY one year. Who cares what side you're on, as long as you're getting paid. Millions. Every year.


Oh, and here's something about the Blue Dogs from the same article:

One of the biggest beneficiaries has been conservative Blue Dog Democrats.

Many Blue Dogs are on the fence about controversial health care issues, such as whether to create government-run insurance plans. Their votes are crucial to passing a final bill, so they also tend to attract more attention and campaign contributions than other Democrats and Republicans.

Health and accident insurers, HMOs and health services organizations increased their contributions to Blue Dogs from $106,200 in the first quarter of 2009 to $122,650 in the second, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.

That is a 15% increase. By comparison, Democrats not in the Blue Dog group saw a 3% hike in contributions.

1. Where is your evidence? It is still an excuse regardless. The President is completely excused from any responsibility regarding failures due to the "blue dogs".

2. The sources you sited are known for having a leftist slant. Even the excerpt you pasted has a judgmental tone. Regardless, the 3 houses are meant to keep a check on the president. Unfortunately for Obama and the democrats, they did a less than stellar job while they had the majority. People got sick of it. Things changed. Oh right, blue dogs..it isn't their fault.

3. Seems fairly unrelated to what I was saying.

"The Blue Dog Coalition was founded in 1994 to provide a unified voice for moderate members of the Democratic Party in the House of Representatives, particularly on economic issues." Hardly "far more conservative" and their conservatism lies in their ideology regarding fiscal matters. (from About.com)

Blue dogs that support(ed) Obama's Healthcare: "Arcuri, Mike (NY-24) Baca, Joe (CA-43) Berry, Marion (AR-01) Bishop, Sanford (GA-02) Boswell, Leonard (IA-03) Cardoza, Dennis (CA-18) Carney, Christopher (PA-10) Cooper, Jim (TN-05) Costa, Jim (CA-20) Cuellar, Henry (TX-28) Dahlkemper, Kathy (PA-03) Donnelly, Joe (IN-02) Ellsworth, Brad (IN-08) Giffords, Gabrielle (AZ-08) Harman, Jane (CA-36) Hill, Baron (IN-09) Michaud, Mike (ME-02) Mitchell, Harry (AZ-05) Moore, Dennis (KS-03) Murphy, Patrick (PA-08) Pomeroy, Earl (ND) Salazar, John (CO-03) Sanchez, Loretta (CA-47) Schiff, Adam (CA-29) Scott, David (GA-13) Space, Zack (OH-18) Thompson, Mike (CA-01) Wilson, Charles (OH-06)"

http://conservapedia.com/Blue_Dog_Democrat

You could find the names elsewhere as well.

#155 Edited by Sooty (8082 posts) -

@spudtastic said:

It's all sour grapes that we are still living better than most nations.Simple jealousy.

I'd say it's more to do with some of the batshit crazy stuff you hear about politics in the US e.g. Sarah Palin, everything republicans do, the hold religion still has over America, and in addition the stigma over the Afghanistan and Iraq invasions and then on top of this 'world policing' a lot of people consider the US to take part in. (whether that's a fair allegation or not)

Quality of life wise, well, the US isn't exactly scoring top marks if any of the statistics can be trusted. Of course I don't think it's a bad place to live, but it certainly wouldn't be my first choice. (the lax gun laws alone make me not want to live there, seeing guns on sale in Walmart made me think WTF)

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43287918/ns/business-world_business/t/us-doesnt-make-cut-happiest-nations-list/#.TzQh8fk8WWQ

#156 Posted by ze_ro (181 posts) -

USA. löl

#157 Edited by Vegetable_Side_Dish (1727 posts) -
@Still_I_Cry said:

1. Where is your evidence? It is still an excuse regardless. The President is completely excused from any responsibility regarding failures due to the "blue dogs".

2. The sources you sited are known for having a leftist slant. Even the excerpt you pasted has a judgmental tone. Regardless, the 3 houses are meant to keep a check on the president. Unfortunately for Obama and the democrats, they did a less than stellar job while they had the majority. People got sick of it. Things changed. Oh right, blue dogs..it isn't their fault.

3. Seems fairly unrelated to what I was saying.

"The Blue Dog Coalition was founded in 1994 to provide a unified voice for moderate members of the Democratic Party in the House of Representatives, particularly on economic issues." Hardly "far more conservative" and their conservatism lies in their ideology regarding fiscal matters. (from About.com)

Blue dogs that support(ed) Obama's Healthcare: "Arcuri, Mike (NY-24) Baca, Joe (CA-43) Berry, Marion (AR-01) Bishop, Sanford (GA-02) Boswell, Leonard (IA-03) Cardoza, Dennis (CA-18) Carney, Christopher (PA-10) Cooper, Jim (TN-05) Costa, Jim (CA-20) Cuellar, Henry (TX-28) Dahlkemper, Kathy (PA-03) Donnelly, Joe (IN-02) Ellsworth, Brad (IN-08) Giffords, Gabrielle (AZ-08) Harman, Jane (CA-36) Hill, Baron (IN-09) Michaud, Mike (ME-02) Mitchell, Harry (AZ-05) Moore, Dennis (KS-03) Murphy, Patrick (PA-08) Pomeroy, Earl (ND) Salazar, John (CO-03) Sanchez, Loretta (CA-47) Schiff, Adam (CA-29) Scott, David (GA-13) Space, Zack (OH-18) Thompson, Mike (CA-01) Wilson, Charles (OH-06)"

http://conservapedia.com/Blue_Dog_Democrat

You could find the names elsewhere as well.

1. My evidence for what? Their more conservative views and voting? Apart from being very well known by anyone who follows American politics, its...in your very own link http://conservapedia.com/Blue_Dog_Democrat. It would do you some good to read the page you linked as well. To the second point, I didn't say Obama was excused for not pushing for the change he promised, I said that this reason, and the other two, are the main reasons why any sort of major reform in US politics is being, can be, and will be stifled when big business interests are involved. 
 
2. "A leftist slant....a judgmental tone. "
Wow. 
Ok.  
Please do tell, how do you put a leftist slant on: 

 I n 2009, there were a record 112 cloture votes (the number of cloture votes is how you measure the use of filibusters). So far in 2010, there have already been more than 40 cloture votes.... The previous record was in 1995-1996, when the Republican-controlled Senate required 50 cloture votes.


Or this:  http://www.senate.gov/pagelayout/reference/cloture_motions/clotureCounts.htm  (Is that .gov website is being too judgmental for you?   
CongressYearsMotions FiledVotes on ClotureCloture Invoked
1122011-2012503621
1112009-20101379163
1102007-200813911261
1092005-2006685434
1082003-2004624912
Notice the hike in numbers? Yeh, you do. 
 A nice bit of perspective, hope this isn't too leftist for you (oh wait, it's just...facts) from http://illuminate.newsvine.com/_news/2010/08/03/4804694-republicans-record-number-of-filibusters 

Another interesting data point: IN the last ninety years, there have been 1,195 cloture motions filed, and 874 cloture votes, per the Senate site. The Republicans in the last three years that they've been in the minority, have caused 215 of the motions to be filed, and 157 of those cloture votes. That means in just the past three years, the Republicans have been responsible for 18% of all filibusters recorded in the past 90 years.

(And that percentage will have grown larger than the 18% figure, as that article was posted in Aug 2010). 
 
As for your next comment "  Regardless, the 3 houses are meant to keep a check on the president. Unfortunately for Obama and the democrats, they did a less than stellar job while they had the majority. People got sick of it. Things changed. Oh right, blue dogs..it isn't their fault. "... it says nothing. We are arguing right now about why it is almost inevitable that they would do a 'less than stellar job', this sentence doesn't tell me anything. Please, clarify, if this is actually a part of your argument.
 
3. Fairly unrelated? Ok, either you're 1. Stupid or 2. Not willing to tackle the argument. 
You wanted to know what the 'excuse' was for the Obama administration being so ineffectual when they had the majority. I just provided you with figures (and believe me, this is just a snapshot of everything that's out there, a quick Google search on lobbying and business influence in the senate is all you need) that clearly show how impossible it is becoming, for any administration, to pass legislation that conflicts with big business interests. This sin't news to anyone who has followed American politics for only a little while, but the problem is only getting worse, and those figures clearly demonstrate the insurmountable power of money and other handouts in American politics.  
 
That description of the Blue Dogs sounds lifted straight from their manifesto, and you were complaining that I was providing you with biased articles? (Sorry, slanted) I mean...come on man. It only take s a little common sense to look past that bullshit. It's the standard line that any political figure will say on a news report or press event when they don't have anything substantive to say. It's just like the Syrian government's statements (albeit more innocuous) when questioned about the thousands of deaths since rioting began; they wheel out the official line on how they want to protect their people and the sovereignty of their nation blah blah blah. It's politics. I can't believe you'd quote this as somehow defending their position. The fiscal responsibility line is just a buzzword used when there isn't any reason they want to block a bill other than vested business interests or dirty politics.  
 
Nice list of voters you have there.    And yes, no shit, they did vote for it in the end, how else could legislation have passed? What they did was steadily water down the bill with more and more concessions, until the public option was no more than a vague promise that about 1 of 10 uninsured Americans MIGHT get coverage by 2014, if new objections hadn't been brought up by then, along with a million other things that result in less care for the citizen and more money for big pharma. They were crucial swing votes, and when the stronger version of the bill was due to be voted on http://www.reuters.com/article/2009/07/23/us-usa-healthcare-idUSTRE56M0HE20090723 they helped halt it. You know what it means when a bill like that takes longer to get approval? It means big pharma (or whoever's gt the cash, really) has more time to advertise against reform and more time to send more money to more politicians and phoney grass roots campaigns and media.  
 
Feel free to vote for the Republicans, if you want. I don't live in America, and gave up following American politics about 6 months after the Healthcare debacle, as I was seeing the same bullshit for years stopping the American citizen from receiving their due. Democrats aren't much better, 60-70% of them are pretty much like their conservative counterparts anyway now, since America seems to continue on its continual shift to the right.  But there's still a few of them that seem upstanding. A few. 
 
I'm out of steam. 
#158 Posted by Vigil (231 posts) -

@Sooty said:

@spudtastic said:

It's all sour grapes that we are still living better than most nations.Simple jealousy.

I'd say it's more to do with some of the batshit crazy stuff you hear about politics in the US e.g. Sarah Palin, everything republicans do, the hold religion still has over America, and in addition the stigma over the Afghanistan and Iraq invasions and then on top of this 'world policing' a lot of people consider the US to take part in. (whether that's a fair allegation or not)

Quality of life wise, well, the US isn't exactly scoring top marks if any of the statistics can be trusted. Of course I don't think it's a bad place to live, but it certainly wouldn't be my first choice. (the lax gun laws alone make me not want to live there, seeing guns on sale in Walmart made me think WTF)

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43287918/ns/business-world_business/t/us-doesnt-make-cut-happiest-nations-list/#.TzQh8fk8WWQ

That's another thing that many European countries don't like about the US, our pro gun laws. I'm not entirely sure why that is such a problem.

#159 Edited by Sooty (8082 posts) -

@Vigil said:

@Sooty said:

@spudtastic said:

It's all sour grapes that we are still living better than most nations.Simple jealousy.

I'd say it's more to do with some of the batshit crazy stuff you hear about politics in the US e.g. Sarah Palin, everything republicans do, the hold religion still has over America, and in addition the stigma over the Afghanistan and Iraq invasions and then on top of this 'world policing' a lot of people consider the US to take part in. (whether that's a fair allegation or not)

Quality of life wise, well, the US isn't exactly scoring top marks if any of the statistics can be trusted. Of course I don't think it's a bad place to live, but it certainly wouldn't be my first choice. (the lax gun laws alone make me not want to live there, seeing guns on sale in Walmart made me think WTF)

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43287918/ns/business-world_business/t/us-doesnt-make-cut-happiest-nations-list/#.TzQh8fk8WWQ

That's another thing that many European countries don't like about the US, our pro gun laws. I'm not entirely sure why that is such a problem.

Well, all the school shootings don't help and they happen fairly often, of course much smaller in scale usually but that still doesn't make it any better in my opinion. It's not just school shootings either, wasn't there that guy sniping people a few years back in the trunk of his car? Yeah...

Aside from that, it makes me very paranoid that pretty much anybody could be packing a gun at any time, of course you can conceal other weapons elsewhere but a gun makes it even easier to kill somebody, even from a distance where you stand zero chance.

#160 Posted by Vigil (231 posts) -

@Sooty said:

@Vigil said:

@Sooty said:

@spudtastic said:

It's all sour grapes that we are still living better than most nations.Simple jealousy.

I'd say it's more to do with some of the batshit crazy stuff you hear about politics in the US e.g. Sarah Palin, everything republicans do, the hold religion still has over America, and in addition the stigma over the Afghanistan and Iraq invasions and then on top of this 'world policing' a lot of people consider the US to take part in. (whether that's a fair allegation or not)

Quality of life wise, well, the US isn't exactly scoring top marks if any of the statistics can be trusted. Of course I don't think it's a bad place to live, but it certainly wouldn't be my first choice. (the lax gun laws alone make me not want to live there, seeing guns on sale in Walmart made me think WTF)

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43287918/ns/business-world_business/t/us-doesnt-make-cut-happiest-nations-list/#.TzQh8fk8WWQ

That's another thing that many European countries don't like about the US, our pro gun laws. I'm not entirely sure why that is such a problem.

Well, all the school shootings don't help and they happen fairly often, of course much smaller in scale usually but that still doesn't make it any better in my opinion. It's not just school shootings either, wasn't there that guy sniping people a few years back in the trunk of his car? Yeah...

Aside from that, it makes me very paranoid that pretty much anybody could be packing a gun at any time, of course you can conceal other weapons elsewhere but a gun makes it even easier to kill somebody, even from a distance where you stand zero chance.

I would say school shootings are not at all a common occurrence, it's not people who legally own or carry firearms that you should be cautious of. Violence exists, regardless if guns are easily available or not. Anyone with intent to do harm to others will find a way to do it, whether it's with a gun, explosives or anything else they can conjure up to inflict death and injury.

Many Americans feel that our right to keep and bear arms is a very important part of our history, me included.

#161 Edited by Sooty (8082 posts) -

@Vigil said:

@Sooty said:

@Vigil said:

@Sooty said:

@spudtastic said:

It's all sour grapes that we are still living better than most nations.Simple jealousy.

I'd say it's more to do with some of the batshit crazy stuff you hear about politics in the US e.g. Sarah Palin, everything republicans do, the hold religion still has over America, and in addition the stigma over the Afghanistan and Iraq invasions and then on top of this 'world policing' a lot of people consider the US to take part in. (whether that's a fair allegation or not)

Quality of life wise, well, the US isn't exactly scoring top marks if any of the statistics can be trusted. Of course I don't think it's a bad place to live, but it certainly wouldn't be my first choice. (the lax gun laws alone make me not want to live there, seeing guns on sale in Walmart made me think WTF)

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43287918/ns/business-world_business/t/us-doesnt-make-cut-happiest-nations-list/#.TzQh8fk8WWQ

That's another thing that many European countries don't like about the US, our pro gun laws. I'm not entirely sure why that is such a problem.

Well, all the school shootings don't help and they happen fairly often, of course much smaller in scale usually but that still doesn't make it any better in my opinion. It's not just school shootings either, wasn't there that guy sniping people a few years back in the trunk of his car? Yeah...

Aside from that, it makes me very paranoid that pretty much anybody could be packing a gun at any time, of course you can conceal other weapons elsewhere but a gun makes it even easier to kill somebody, even from a distance where you stand zero chance.

I would say school shootings are not at all a common occurrence, it's not people who legally own or carry firearms that you should be cautious of. Violence exists, regardless if guns are easily available or not. Anyone with intent to do harm to others will find a way to do it, whether it's with a gun, explosives or anything else they can conjure up to inflict death and injury.

Many Americans feel that our right to keep and bear arms is a very important part of our history, me included.

A gun lowers the barrier, there's not many other weapons you can quite easily go on a killing spree with. You could of course go around stabbing people but let's be honest that's really not going to be as easy to pull off and a knife vs. unarmed person is way better odds than a gun vs. an average Walmart shopper. That's fine if it's how you feel, I'm just an outsider that has spent extensive time in the U.S, while it's a nice enough place to visit every once in a while I do feel a little on edge that somebody could be packing. When I was in Orlando a freaking drive by happened on International Drive. Me and my family could have been there, fortunately we was near the top of it when it happened.

School shootings are still way more common than they should be, see here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/School_shooting#Notable_school_shootings

#162 Posted by Vegetable_Side_Dish (1727 posts) -
@Vigil  said: 

I would say school shootings are not at all a common occurrence

Wrong.  

Just, wrong. 
#163 Posted by Vigil (231 posts) -

@Sooty said:

@Vigil said:

@Sooty said:

@Vigil said:

@Sooty said:

@spudtastic said:

It's all sour grapes that we are still living better than most nations.Simple jealousy.

I'd say it's more to do with some of the batshit crazy stuff you hear about politics in the US e.g. Sarah Palin, everything republicans do, the hold religion still has over America, and in addition the stigma over the Afghanistan and Iraq invasions and then on top of this 'world policing' a lot of people consider the US to take part in. (whether that's a fair allegation or not)

Quality of life wise, well, the US isn't exactly scoring top marks if any of the statistics can be trusted. Of course I don't think it's a bad place to live, but it certainly wouldn't be my first choice. (the lax gun laws alone make me not want to live there, seeing guns on sale in Walmart made me think WTF)

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43287918/ns/business-world_business/t/us-doesnt-make-cut-happiest-nations-list/#.TzQh8fk8WWQ

That's another thing that many European countries don't like about the US, our pro gun laws. I'm not entirely sure why that is such a problem.

Well, all the school shootings don't help and they happen fairly often, of course much smaller in scale usually but that still doesn't make it any better in my opinion. It's not just school shootings either, wasn't there that guy sniping people a few years back in the trunk of his car? Yeah...

Aside from that, it makes me very paranoid that pretty much anybody could be packing a gun at any time, of course you can conceal other weapons elsewhere but a gun makes it even easier to kill somebody, even from a distance where you stand zero chance.

I would say school shootings are not at all a common occurrence, it's not people who legally own or carry firearms that you should be cautious of. Violence exists, regardless if guns are easily available or not. Anyone with intent to do harm to others will find a way to do it, whether it's with a gun, explosives or anything else they can conjure up to inflict death and injury.

Many Americans feel that our right to keep and bear arms is a very important part of our history, me included.

A gun lowers the barrier, there's not many other weapons you can quite easily go on a killing spree with. You could of course go around stabbing people but let's be honest that's really not going to be as easy to pull off and a knife vs. unarmed person is way better odds than a gun vs. an average Walmart shopper.

School shootings are still way more common than they should be, see here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/School_shooting#Notable_school_shootings

Considering the large number of gun owners in the US, those statistics are very low. Certain freedoms come at a price, that's unavoidable, but we manage who can and cannot legally obtain firearms. Thinking that simply removing guns from the equation will solve the problem is unrealistic.

Honestly, I'd rather this not turn into a gun debate.

#164 Posted by GunslingerPanda (4757 posts) -

A country that legalizes and glorifies guns is a barbaric country.

#165 Posted by Vigil (231 posts) -

@GunslingerPanda said:

A country that legalizes and glorifies guns is a barbaric country.

Well that's a generalization if I ever saw one.

#166 Posted by creepybacon (6 posts) -

@Vigil said:

@Sooty said:

@spudtastic said:

It's all sour grapes that we are still living better than most nations.Simple jealousy.

I'd say it's more to do with some of the batshit crazy stuff you hear about politics in the US e.g. Sarah Palin, everything republicans do, the hold religion still has over America, and in addition the stigma over the Afghanistan and Iraq invasions and then on top of this 'world policing' a lot of people consider the US to take part in. (whether that's a fair allegation or not)

Quality of life wise, well, the US isn't exactly scoring top marks if any of the statistics can be trusted. Of course I don't think it's a bad place to live, but it certainly wouldn't be my first choice. (the lax gun laws alone make me not want to live there, seeing guns on sale in Walmart made me think WTF)

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43287918/ns/business-world_business/t/us-doesnt-make-cut-happiest-nations-list/#.TzQh8fk8WWQ

That's another thing that many European countries don't like about the US, our pro gun laws. I'm not entirely sure why that is such a problem.

People are stupid. I don't like the idea of any of them being allowed to walk around with a gun. No need for it.

#167 Posted by Vigil (231 posts) -

@creepybacon said:

@Vigil said:

@Sooty said:

@spudtastic said:

It's all sour grapes that we are still living better than most nations.Simple jealousy.

I'd say it's more to do with some of the batshit crazy stuff you hear about politics in the US e.g. Sarah Palin, everything republicans do, the hold religion still has over America, and in addition the stigma over the Afghanistan and Iraq invasions and then on top of this 'world policing' a lot of people consider the US to take part in. (whether that's a fair allegation or not)

Quality of life wise, well, the US isn't exactly scoring top marks if any of the statistics can be trusted. Of course I don't think it's a bad place to live, but it certainly wouldn't be my first choice. (the lax gun laws alone make me not want to live there, seeing guns on sale in Walmart made me think WTF)

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43287918/ns/business-world_business/t/us-doesnt-make-cut-happiest-nations-list/#.TzQh8fk8WWQ

That's another thing that many European countries don't like about the US, our pro gun laws. I'm not entirely sure why that is such a problem.

People are stupid. I don't like the idea of any of them being allowed to walk around with a gun. No need for it.

Most gun owners don't actually walk around with guns, all but a couple of states require you to have a ccw (carrying a concealed weapon) permit. I don't feel that most people are all that stupid.

#168 Posted by ShadowConqueror (3052 posts) -

The fear that everyone is walking around with a gun on them is absurd.

#169 Posted by Vigil (231 posts) -

@ShadowConqueror said:

The fear that everyone is walking around with a gun on them is absurd.

It really is, I get a sense that a lot of people are to afraid to leave their home, paranoia is an unhealthy mentality.

#170 Posted by PeasantAbuse (5138 posts) -

@Vigil said:

@ShadowConqueror said:

The fear that everyone is walking around with a gun on them is absurd.

It really is, I get a sense that a lot of people are to afraid to leave their home, paranoia is an unhealthy mentality.

I live in the US and the only guns I've ever seen in my life are the ones they keep in the cases at Walmart and stores like that. I can't imagine walking around assuming everyone is carrying a gun, that would be a shitty existence.

#171 Posted by spudtastic (542 posts) -

I'm with Vigil on the gun rights.Peeps who are gun buffs are more likely to register, clean , and train for proper usage and storage. It's the bad guys who ignore safety rules. But, I respect the opinions of all of you. I don't think it detracts from the US as being a good place to live, really. High taxes are making this a 3rd world nation fast, methinx.

#172 Edited by Everyones_A_Critic (6299 posts) -

As unsafe as guns can be it'd only be worse if they were illegal to own by civilians. You can't stop people from getting what they want, and most crimes are committed with illegal guns anyway since they can't be traced.

#173 Posted by Dagbiker (6976 posts) -
@Sooty you should be paranoid, they made us go to school here in montgomery county while that sniper was on the loose. Every day we stood on the street corner waiting for the bus.