#1 Posted by Eli (334 posts) -

Hey guys, I'm just just soliciting advice if you would be kind enough to help. I bought a Lenovo Y500 notebook about two weeks ago (particularly this model):

http://shop.lenovo.com/SEUILibrary/controller/e/web/LenovoPortal/en_US/catalog.workflow:item.detail?GroupID=457&Code=59371963&category_id=5B0116E237099FA0FCA012D9B20ED2FB

but now that I hear about the new Haswell CPUs on the horizon, I am very concerned I bought this model too early as it still has a 3rd gen Ivy Bridge CPU in it. Did I make a mistake buying this so soon and should have I waited? Because I'm honestly kind of kicking myself for it now that I listened to last week's This is Only A Test.

Thanks.

#2 Edited by OldGuy (1511 posts) -

No. Everything is obsolete the second you open the box. If you wait for the next big thing there is sure to be a new next big thing that you should wait for.

Decide. Buy. (and here's the key) Don't look at tech stuff any more until you are ready to buy again.

#3 Edited by Little_Socrates (5675 posts) -

Iiiiii presumed this was somehow related to @ryan "taswell" davis.

#4 Posted by Reisz (1461 posts) -

If you bought it two weeks ago at a reputable outlet you should be able to return it. Usually the kind of improvements that come with first gen architecture changes are only really relevant to power users or people with very specific use-cases. Don't let it bother you.

#5 Edited by AndrewB (7490 posts) -

Haswell seems to be more about cutting power consumption and boosting integrated graphics performance further. I might have waited, but I'm crazy anal about that stuff. It all depends really on how much the battery life is really effected given the various other levels of increased power consumption. The HD 5000/"Iris" GPUs are supposed to be twice as fast as the HD4000, but given the performance of the 4000, that's not saying a whole lot when it comes to modern games, let alone future games (and if you're buying a laptop with a discrete GPU like yours, it makes for even less of an issue).

#7 Posted by Eli (334 posts) -

@andrewb Yeah, I'm pretty anal about that kind of stuff, too. That's why I feel bad about it. I'm just trying to clarify how much of a difference (if one at all) it would make. Thanks Andrew and @reisz, though.

#8 Edited by AndrewB (7490 posts) -

@eli: I would say modest-to-unnoticeable boost to CPU speed and battery life (though with a discrete GPU like that, I'd figure the system to be plugged in all the time anyway if you want more than a paltry couple of hours of gaming).

But that's based entirely off speculation about a processor/chipset architecture that has yet to be seen by anyone not under embargo. It's just conjecture based off early articles.

To be honest, I'm holding off only because I'm very recently in the market for a new laptop and I don't intend to use a discrete GPU. That boost in GPU performance would be key for my case.

#9 Edited by alternate (2682 posts) -

HD4000 on board gfx is sufficient for everything apart from games with complex gfx. Haswell will be a performance boost (they claim 50%) but still not good enough for games that require discreet gfx - so not much of a difference in practice.

The only thing you might miss is discount on the ivy bridge stuff when the new shiny shiny comes out. But that might mean waiting months. October usually isn't it? Just after the schools go back and everyone cleared out the old stock.

#10 Posted by Eli (334 posts) -

Well, the reported 50% performance boost is what truly has me irked about my decision to buy the current model (with Ivy Bridge). I just feel like I might be getting worked up for nothing, though.

#11 Posted by Kidavenger (3509 posts) -

@eli: That laptop you bought has a dedicated GPU and wouldn't make much use of an integrated internal gpu which seems to be the main improvement intel is pushing with this. I wouldn't worry about it.

#12 Posted by MonkeyKing1969 (2563 posts) -

I try to plan what I buy, but then I just go with it. I'm looking at the Lenovo ThinkPad Helix for this summer which has 3rd gen not the Haswell 4th gen. I'm going for the Helix because I like the design concept and a 3rd gen i7 mobile chip is nothing to sneeze at for power. Yeah..I want a 1.8 lb tablet PC...so sue me! ;-) [Honestly, it was either the ThinkPad Helix or the Surface Pro, but the Helix has an i7, bigger SSD, and keyboard.]

#13 Edited by AndrewB (7490 posts) -

@eli said:

Well, the reported 50% performance boost is what truly has me irked about my decision to buy the current model (with Ivy Bridge). I just feel like I might be getting worked up for nothing, though.

But you have a discrete Nvidia GPU, and if it's switching between the two for power conservation reasons, the HD 4000 is definitely enough to run anything besides recent games. That 50% performance boost is still significantly below what is a brand new mobile Nvidia card in the mid range (the 750M).

#14 Posted by MikkaQ (10268 posts) -

Will it make the games or work you do more fun/efficient? If yes, then get it, if no then who cares?

#15 Edited by Fattony12000 (7044 posts) -

@eli: Ivy Bridge CPUs are still dandy as hell, but it does somewhat beg the question as to why you bought it now, knowing that there would be a newer/better/faster/more efficient CPU released this year, only for you to have misgivings after the fact. You know that Intel updates and refreshes the Core ix series every year, right? However, if the machine does what you need it to do right now, enjoy it!

Haswell in laptops is gonna be pretty sick, though. I'm very tempted to buy my first MacBook Air later this year when they get the update.

#16 Edited by Eli (334 posts) -

@fattony12000 said:

@eli: Ivy Bridge CPUs are still dandy as hell, but it does somewhat beg the question as to why you bought it now, knowing that there would be a newer/better/faster/more efficient CPU released this year, only for you to have misgivings after the fact. You know that Intel updates and refreshes the Core ix series every year, right? However, if the machine does what you need it to do right now, enjoy it!

Haswell in laptops is gonna be pretty sick, though. I'm very tempted to buy my first MacBook Air later this year when they get the update.

I bought it because my understanding was that the difference it would make for me particularly would be negligible, but I'm hearing that may not be the case. I was also under the impression consumers wouldn't be able to buy laptops with Haswell inside until at least September (but now I'm hearing as early as next month).