#1 Edited by super2j (1652 posts) -

So this movie is on tv right now and my sister is watching it. Now, to my surprise Robert De niro is in this and plays a gay captain, a goat is thrown against a wall (so Dumb, making it hilarious), and the witch turns another goat into a man and immediately into a woman... im not sure if its a commentary on sex changes? And Ricky Gervais is in it too.

The main character is kinda creepy in kidnapping this woman by tying a rope to her.

ok a witch that ages as she uses her magic had her boobs sag one by one.

so i dont know how to feel about this. I expected this to be very generic.

Edit: HAHA, De Niro is hilarious running around in a dress dancing. hahahahaha

Edit2: a ghost is straight up watching the main characters getting it on. How is this a kids movie?

#2 Posted by Zuldim (288 posts) -

It's based on a Neil Gaiman novel, which manages to be even more bizzare than the film.

I really like the movie, and as you said, it's certainly not generic. If there's one thing Neil Gaiman certainly cannot be accused of, it's being generic. He wrote a version of "The Jungle Book" where the main character is a boy who lives in a Graveyard and is raised by ghosts. Called "The Graveyard Book". Dude's writings are trippy. And that's why I love them, so whatever.

So yes, to answer your question, Stardust the movie is in fact pretty great.

#3 Posted by Yummylee (21208 posts) -

Haven't seen it in years, but I remember enjoying it.

#4 Posted by super2j (1652 posts) -

@Zuldim said:

It's based on a Neil Gaiman novel, which manages to be even more bizzare than the film.

I really like the movie, and as you said, it's certainly not generic. If there's one thing Neil Gaiman certainly cannot be accused of, it's being generic. He wrote a version of "The Jungle Book" where the main character is a boy who lives in a Graveyard and is raised by ghosts. Called "The Graveyard Book". Dude's writings are trippy. And that's why I love them, so whatever.

So yes, to answer your question, Stardust the movie is in fact pretty great.

So what you are saying is that i should go read some of these books? I mean i just read most of the hitch hikers guide to the galaxy collection(Thanks Will Smith of Tested). So im definitely interested in more weird unique story telling.

@Yummylee: Im glad im not alone on this.

#5 Edited by oneidwille (147 posts) -

Never watched it. Though I heard De Niro took the role after turning down the Barbossa role from the "Pirates of the Carribean"movies.

#6 Posted by SeanFoster (854 posts) -

I enjoy pretty much every film director Matthew Vaughn has done including Stardust.

#7 Posted by PokeIkzai (385 posts) -

American Gods by Neil Gaiman is one of my favorite books. Highly recommend you checking him out. (Also Sandman.)

#8 Edited by super2j (1652 posts) -

God damn, im actually getting invested in this. Right now the prince and main character dude just entered the witches den.

i just realized, should I have written spoilers anywhere?

#9 Posted by Zuldim (288 posts) -

@super2j said:

@Zuldim said:

It's based on a Neil Gaiman novel, which manages to be even more bizzare than the film.

I really like the movie, and as you said, it's certainly not generic. If there's one thing Neil Gaiman certainly cannot be accused of, it's being generic. He wrote a version of "The Jungle Book" where the main character is a boy who lives in a Graveyard and is raised by ghosts. Called "The Graveyard Book". Dude's writings are trippy. And that's why I love them, so whatever.

So yes, to answer your question, Stardust the movie is in fact pretty great.

So what you are saying is that i should go read some of these books? I mean i just read most of the hitch hikers guide to the galaxy collection(Thanks Will Smith of Tested). So im definitely interested in more weird unique story telling.

@Yummylee: Im glad im not alone on this.

If you liked Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, one book I can strongly recommend by Neil Gaiman (co-written by Terry Pratchitt) is Good Omens. The style which the book is written in reminds me very much of how the Hitchhiker's book were. In many ways it reminds me of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, but set in a psuedo-biblical apocalypse setting, instead of a sci-fi one. The whole plot of that one is that the forces of Heaven and Hell have decided that it's time for the apocalypse to begin, but an Angel and a Demon who decide they like Earth how it is just fine, not perfectly good or perfectly evil, and so they try to find a way to stop it-- Plus, no one can seem to find the anti-christ. It's a fun read, which made me laugh out loud multiple times. It's also being adapted into a movie, which I think is slated for 2014.

American Gods is probably his most famous novel. I'd give story details on that one, but honestly the less you know about it going in, the more you'll probably enjoy that specific story. Needless to say, it's considered one of the best urban fantasy novels ever written for good reason, and is worth the time. Stardust, as I said, is a really good read. The movie nailed the tone of the book pretty well in my opinion, so if you want that story but with some more details, then it's a great read. It's tonally similar to classic fairy tales, and I really like it. His children's books are also all fantastic, and, though they're short reads as they were meant for children, they're all unique enough stories that they're well worth the time. I've read Coraline (which was made into another pretty good movie by Laika a few years back), and The Graveyard Book, which I mentioned before. Both are really good reads, even as an adult.

He's probably most famous for his work on the comic series Sandman, but I've never read Sandman even though I hear it's incredible, so I can't comment on that.

He also has quite a few really good short stories, which are worth tracking down if you're into that sort of thing. One I'd recommend off the top of my head is "A Study in Emerald", which is a rewritten version of the first Sherlock Holmes story "A Study in Scarlet", set in the world of H.P. Lovecraft's Cthulu Mythos. It's as awesome as it sounds.

So yeah, Neil Gaiman is one of my favorite authors, and if you want to read some really good books, he has everything from heady fantasy novels, to comedies (like Good Omens).

#10 Posted by Zuldim (288 posts) -

@super2j said:

God damn, im actually getting invested in this. Right now the prince and main character dude just entered the witches den.

i just realized, should I have written spoilers anywhere?

Eh, the movie is like six years old at this point, the book was written in the ninties, and nothing you've mentioned has been hugely spoilery. I think you're fine.

#11 Edited by super2j (1652 posts) -

@Zuldim: I thought so, but i was worried i might have introduced and ruined this movie for someone.

@Zuldim said:

@super2j said:

@Zuldim said:

It's based on a Neil Gaiman novel, which manages to be even more bizzare than the film.

I really like the movie, and as you said, it's certainly not generic. If there's one thing Neil Gaiman certainly cannot be accused of, it's being generic. He wrote a version of "The Jungle Book" where the main character is a boy who lives in a Graveyard and is raised by ghosts. Called "The Graveyard Book". Dude's writings are trippy. And that's why I love them, so whatever.

So yes, to answer your question, Stardust the movie is in fact pretty great.

So what you are saying is that i should go read some of these books? I mean i just read most of the hitch hikers guide to the galaxy collection(Thanks Will Smith of Tested). So im definitely interested in more weird unique story telling.

@Yummylee: Im glad im not alone on this.

If you liked Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, one book I can strongly recommend by Neil Gaiman (co-written by Terry Pratchitt) is Good Omens. The style which the book is written in reminds me very much of how the Hitchhiker's book were. In many ways it reminds me of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, but set in a psuedo-biblical apocalypse setting, instead of a sci-fi one. The whole plot of that one is that the forces of Heaven and Hell have decided that it's time for the apocalypse to begin, but an Angel and a Demon who decide they like Earth how it is just fine, not perfectly good or perfectly evil, and so they try to find a way to stop it-- Plus, no one can seem to find the anti-christ. It's a fun read, which made me laugh out loud multiple times. It's also being adapted into a movie, which I think is slated for 2014.

American Gods is probably his most famous novel. I'd give story details on that one, but honestly the less you know about it going in, the more you'll probably enjoy that specific story. Needless to say, it's considered one of the best urban fantasy novels ever written for good reason, and is worth the time. Stardust, as I said, is a really good read. The movie nailed the tone of the book pretty well in my opinion, so if you want that story but with some more details, then it's a great read. It's tonally similar to classic fairy tales, and I really like it. His children's books are also all fantastic, and, though they're short reads as they were meant for children, they're all unique enough stories that they're well worth the time. I've read Coraline (which was made into another pretty good movie by Laika a few years back), and The Graveyard Book, which I mentioned before. Both are really good reads, even as an adult.

He's probably most famous for his work on the comic series Sandman, but I've never read Sandman even though I hear it's incredible, so I can't comment on that.

He also has quite a few really good short stories, which are worth tracking down if you're into that sort of thing. One I'd recommend off the top of my head is "A Study in Emerald", which is a rewritten version of the first Sherlock Holmes story "A Study in Scarlet", set in the world of H.P. Lovecraft's Cthulu Mythos. It's as awesome as it sounds.

So yeah, Neil Gaiman is one of my favorite authors, and if you want to read some really good books, he has everything from heady fantasy novels, to comedies (like Good Omens).

So, I went to request Good omens and American gods.... and there are a lot or holds on it.Good Omens had 5 holds on a total of 4 copies but American gods had 86 holds on 3 copies. What is going on?? I mean there were a crazy number of request for Hitch hikers guide during school time for kids and then when the summer hit, boom nothing. Is there a bunch of teachers telling students to read this? not sure but this seems like a lot of people for books that have been out for a long time.

btw: the movie just ended, pretty good. I eventually got to the point where i was enjoying it unironically.

#12 Posted by BaneFireLord (2908 posts) -
@Zuldim said:

@super2j said:

@Zuldim said:

It's based on a Neil Gaiman novel, which manages to be even more bizzare than the film.

I really like the movie, and as you said, it's certainly not generic. If there's one thing Neil Gaiman certainly cannot be accused of, it's being generic. He wrote a version of "The Jungle Book" where the main character is a boy who lives in a Graveyard and is raised by ghosts. Called "The Graveyard Book". Dude's writings are trippy. And that's why I love them, so whatever.

So yes, to answer your question, Stardust the movie is in fact pretty great.

So what you are saying is that i should go read some of these books? I mean i just read most of the hitch hikers guide to the galaxy collection(Thanks Will Smith of Tested). So im definitely interested in more weird unique story telling.

@Yummylee: Im glad im not alone on this.

If you liked Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, one book I can strongly recommend by Neil Gaiman (co-written by Terry Pratchitt) is Good Omens. The style which the book is written in reminds me very much of how the Hitchhiker's book were. In many ways it reminds me of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, but set in a psuedo-biblical apocalypse setting, instead of a sci-fi one. The whole plot of that one is that the forces of Heaven and Hell have decided that it's time for the apocalypse to begin, but an Angel and a Demon who decide they like Earth how it is just fine, not perfectly good or perfectly evil, and so they try to find a way to stop it-- Plus, no one can seem to find the anti-christ. It's a fun read, which made me laugh out loud multiple times. It's also being adapted into a movie, which I think is slated for 2014.

 
I would also heavily, heavily recommend everything Terry Pratchett has written alone if you like Hitchhiker's. I would describe Discworld to you, but I think you're better off just going off and reading them without any information.
#13 Posted by falling_fast (2180 posts) -

no. no it's not a very good movie. read the illustrated version of the book, instead. and watch Mirrormask.

#14 Posted by MordeaniisChaos (5730 posts) -

I enjoyed it rather a lot.

#15 Posted by super2j (1652 posts) -

@damnable_fiend said:

no. no it's not a very good movie. read the illustrated version of the book, instead. and watch Mirrormask.

So do i start with the first book? I know this may sound like a dumb question and it kinda is. But the series looks like its been going 20years. I suspect that each book is a separate contained story. Yikes, wikipedia says that there have been 39 books, If they are self contained then can would not mind a top 10 list or something to get me going?

#16 Posted by Barrock (3525 posts) -

@super2j said:

@damnable_fiend said:

no. no it's not a very good movie. read the illustrated version of the book, instead. and watch Mirrormask.

So do i start with the first book? I know this may sound like a dumb question and it kinda is. But the series looks like its been going 20years. I suspect that each book is a separate contained story. Yikes, wikipedia says that there have been 39 books, If they are self contained then can would not mind a top 10 list or something to get me going?

You talking about Discworld? Yes they are all separate stories. There may be a reference or two that you don't get if you haven't read another book but otherwise you're good.

#17 Posted by falling_fast (2180 posts) -

oh. the discworld books? start with Night Watch. You absolutely don't need to read them in order. I much prefer the later books, personally.

#18 Posted by Zuldim (288 posts) -

@super2j said:

@Zuldim: I thought so, but i was worried i might have introduced and ruined this movie for someone.

@Zuldim said:

@super2j said:

@Zuldim said:

It's based on a Neil Gaiman novel, which manages to be even more bizzare than the film.

I really like the movie, and as you said, it's certainly not generic. If there's one thing Neil Gaiman certainly cannot be accused of, it's being generic. He wrote a version of "The Jungle Book" where the main character is a boy who lives in a Graveyard and is raised by ghosts. Called "The Graveyard Book". Dude's writings are trippy. And that's why I love them, so whatever.

So yes, to answer your question, Stardust the movie is in fact pretty great.

So what you are saying is that i should go read some of these books? I mean i just read most of the hitch hikers guide to the galaxy collection(Thanks Will Smith of Tested). So im definitely interested in more weird unique story telling.

@Yummylee: Im glad im not alone on this.

If you liked Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, one book I can strongly recommend by Neil Gaiman (co-written by Terry Pratchitt) is Good Omens. The style which the book is written in reminds me very much of how the Hitchhiker's book were. In many ways it reminds me of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, but set in a psuedo-biblical apocalypse setting, instead of a sci-fi one. The whole plot of that one is that the forces of Heaven and Hell have decided that it's time for the apocalypse to begin, but an Angel and a Demon who decide they like Earth how it is just fine, not perfectly good or perfectly evil, and so they try to find a way to stop it-- Plus, no one can seem to find the anti-christ. It's a fun read, which made me laugh out loud multiple times. It's also being adapted into a movie, which I think is slated for 2014.

American Gods is probably his most famous novel. I'd give story details on that one, but honestly the less you know about it going in, the more you'll probably enjoy that specific story. Needless to say, it's considered one of the best urban fantasy novels ever written for good reason, and is worth the time. Stardust, as I said, is a really good read. The movie nailed the tone of the book pretty well in my opinion, so if you want that story but with some more details, then it's a great read. It's tonally similar to classic fairy tales, and I really like it. His children's books are also all fantastic, and, though they're short reads as they were meant for children, they're all unique enough stories that they're well worth the time. I've read Coraline (which was made into another pretty good movie by Laika a few years back), and The Graveyard Book, which I mentioned before. Both are really good reads, even as an adult.

He's probably most famous for his work on the comic series Sandman, but I've never read Sandman even though I hear it's incredible, so I can't comment on that.

He also has quite a few really good short stories, which are worth tracking down if you're into that sort of thing. One I'd recommend off the top of my head is "A Study in Emerald", which is a rewritten version of the first Sherlock Holmes story "A Study in Scarlet", set in the world of H.P. Lovecraft's Cthulu Mythos. It's as awesome as it sounds.

So yeah, Neil Gaiman is one of my favorite authors, and if you want to read some really good books, he has everything from heady fantasy novels, to comedies (like Good Omens).

So, I went to request Good omens and American gods.... and there are a lot or holds on it.Good Omens had 5 holds on a total of 4 copies but American gods had 86 holds on 3 copies. What is going on?? I mean there were a crazy number of request for Hitch hikers guide during school time for kids and then when the summer hit, boom nothing. Is there a bunch of teachers telling students to read this? not sure but this seems like a lot of people for books that have been out for a long time.

btw: the movie just ended, pretty good. I eventually got to the point where i was enjoying it unironically.

I think American Gods was recently announced as being made into an HBO series next year, so that might have something to do with it. That does seem like an incredible number of requests though.

#19 Posted by falling_fast (2180 posts) -

@Zuldim said:

@super2j said:

@Zuldim: I thought so, but i was worried i might have introduced and ruined this movie for someone.

@Zuldim said:

@super2j said:

@Zuldim said:

It's based on a Neil Gaiman novel, which manages to be even more bizzare than the film.

I really like the movie, and as you said, it's certainly not generic. If there's one thing Neil Gaiman certainly cannot be accused of, it's being generic. He wrote a version of "The Jungle Book" where the main character is a boy who lives in a Graveyard and is raised by ghosts. Called "The Graveyard Book". Dude's writings are trippy. And that's why I love them, so whatever.

So yes, to answer your question, Stardust the movie is in fact pretty great.

So what you are saying is that i should go read some of these books? I mean i just read most of the hitch hikers guide to the galaxy collection(Thanks Will Smith of Tested). So im definitely interested in more weird unique story telling.

@Yummylee: Im glad im not alone on this.

If you liked Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, one book I can strongly recommend by Neil Gaiman (co-written by Terry Pratchitt) is Good Omens. The style which the book is written in reminds me very much of how the Hitchhiker's book were. In many ways it reminds me of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, but set in a psuedo-biblical apocalypse setting, instead of a sci-fi one. The whole plot of that one is that the forces of Heaven and Hell have decided that it's time for the apocalypse to begin, but an Angel and a Demon who decide they like Earth how it is just fine, not perfectly good or perfectly evil, and so they try to find a way to stop it-- Plus, no one can seem to find the anti-christ. It's a fun read, which made me laugh out loud multiple times. It's also being adapted into a movie, which I think is slated for 2014.

American Gods is probably his most famous novel. I'd give story details on that one, but honestly the less you know about it going in, the more you'll probably enjoy that specific story. Needless to say, it's considered one of the best urban fantasy novels ever written for good reason, and is worth the time. Stardust, as I said, is a really good read. The movie nailed the tone of the book pretty well in my opinion, so if you want that story but with some more details, then it's a great read. It's tonally similar to classic fairy tales, and I really like it. His children's books are also all fantastic, and, though they're short reads as they were meant for children, they're all unique enough stories that they're well worth the time. I've read Coraline (which was made into another pretty good movie by Laika a few years back), and The Graveyard Book, which I mentioned before. Both are really good reads, even as an adult.

He's probably most famous for his work on the comic series Sandman, but I've never read Sandman even though I hear it's incredible, so I can't comment on that.

He also has quite a few really good short stories, which are worth tracking down if you're into that sort of thing. One I'd recommend off the top of my head is "A Study in Emerald", which is a rewritten version of the first Sherlock Holmes story "A Study in Scarlet", set in the world of H.P. Lovecraft's Cthulu Mythos. It's as awesome as it sounds.

So yeah, Neil Gaiman is one of my favorite authors, and if you want to read some really good books, he has everything from heady fantasy novels, to comedies (like Good Omens).

So, I went to request Good omens and American gods.... and there are a lot or holds on it.Good Omens had 5 holds on a total of 4 copies but American gods had 86 holds on 3 copies. What is going on?? I mean there were a crazy number of request for Hitch hikers guide during school time for kids and then when the summer hit, boom nothing. Is there a bunch of teachers telling students to read this? not sure but this seems like a lot of people for books that have been out for a long time.

btw: the movie just ended, pretty good. I eventually got to the point where i was enjoying it unironically.

I think American Gods was recently announced as being made into an HBO series next year, so that might have something to do with it. That does seem like an incredible number of requests though.

wait, whaaaat. holy fuck, that would be awesome

#20 Edited by Jrinswand (1695 posts) -

@Zuldim said:

It's also being adapted into a movie, which I think is slated for 2014.

He's probably most famous for his work on the comic series Sandman, but I've never read Sandman even though I hear it's incredible, so I can't comment on that.

I can virtually guarantee that that movie will never get made. There have been rumors of its creation for a decade now. Gaiman may have had his hands in quite a few movie/television projects, but Terry Pratchett's luck with film is pretty bad. There have been a couple of dreadful Discworld miniseries and a couple of dreadful Discworld animated feature lengths, but as for real, live cinema, I wouldn't count on it.

As for Gaiman, he's pretty awesome. You really should check out Sandman though.

Edit: Also, I thought Stardust sucked pretty bad. The novel was significantly better, but if it weren't for the artwork by Charles Vess, I'm not sure I would have been able to get through the whole thing.

#21 Posted by Zuldim (288 posts) -

@damnable_fiend said:

@Zuldim said:

@super2j said:

@Zuldim: I thought so, but i was worried i might have introduced and ruined this movie for someone.

@Zuldim said:

@super2j said:

@Zuldim said:

It's based on a Neil Gaiman novel, which manages to be even more bizzare than the film.

I really like the movie, and as you said, it's certainly not generic. If there's one thing Neil Gaiman certainly cannot be accused of, it's being generic. He wrote a version of "The Jungle Book" where the main character is a boy who lives in a Graveyard and is raised by ghosts. Called "The Graveyard Book". Dude's writings are trippy. And that's why I love them, so whatever.

So yes, to answer your question, Stardust the movie is in fact pretty great.

So what you are saying is that i should go read some of these books? I mean i just read most of the hitch hikers guide to the galaxy collection(Thanks Will Smith of Tested). So im definitely interested in more weird unique story telling.

@Yummylee: Im glad im not alone on this.

If you liked Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, one book I can strongly recommend by Neil Gaiman (co-written by Terry Pratchitt) is Good Omens. The style which the book is written in reminds me very much of how the Hitchhiker's book were. In many ways it reminds me of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, but set in a psuedo-biblical apocalypse setting, instead of a sci-fi one. The whole plot of that one is that the forces of Heaven and Hell have decided that it's time for the apocalypse to begin, but an Angel and a Demon who decide they like Earth how it is just fine, not perfectly good or perfectly evil, and so they try to find a way to stop it-- Plus, no one can seem to find the anti-christ. It's a fun read, which made me laugh out loud multiple times. It's also being adapted into a movie, which I think is slated for 2014.

American Gods is probably his most famous novel. I'd give story details on that one, but honestly the less you know about it going in, the more you'll probably enjoy that specific story. Needless to say, it's considered one of the best urban fantasy novels ever written for good reason, and is worth the time. Stardust, as I said, is a really good read. The movie nailed the tone of the book pretty well in my opinion, so if you want that story but with some more details, then it's a great read. It's tonally similar to classic fairy tales, and I really like it. His children's books are also all fantastic, and, though they're short reads as they were meant for children, they're all unique enough stories that they're well worth the time. I've read Coraline (which was made into another pretty good movie by Laika a few years back), and The Graveyard Book, which I mentioned before. Both are really good reads, even as an adult.

He's probably most famous for his work on the comic series Sandman, but I've never read Sandman even though I hear it's incredible, so I can't comment on that.

He also has quite a few really good short stories, which are worth tracking down if you're into that sort of thing. One I'd recommend off the top of my head is "A Study in Emerald", which is a rewritten version of the first Sherlock Holmes story "A Study in Scarlet", set in the world of H.P. Lovecraft's Cthulu Mythos. It's as awesome as it sounds.

So yeah, Neil Gaiman is one of my favorite authors, and if you want to read some really good books, he has everything from heady fantasy novels, to comedies (like Good Omens).

So, I went to request Good omens and American gods.... and there are a lot or holds on it.Good Omens had 5 holds on a total of 4 copies but American gods had 86 holds on 3 copies. What is going on?? I mean there were a crazy number of request for Hitch hikers guide during school time for kids and then when the summer hit, boom nothing. Is there a bunch of teachers telling students to read this? not sure but this seems like a lot of people for books that have been out for a long time.

btw: the movie just ended, pretty good. I eventually got to the point where i was enjoying it unironically.

I think American Gods was recently announced as being made into an HBO series next year, so that might have something to do with it. That does seem like an incredible number of requests though.

wait, whaaaat. holy fuck, that would be awesome

http://io9.com/5811012/tom-hanks-producing-6-seasons-of-neil-gaimans-american-gods-for-hbo

So yeah, it's supposedly slated for next year, but it doesn't look like there's been any real news on it since it was announced. Gaiman is also supposedly considering writing a sequel, so that's awesome too. Fingers crossed that the show actually comes to fruition.

#22 Posted by Kraznor (1578 posts) -

"Pretty Great" works, though I may downgrade it to "pretty good", personally. Remember it was slickly made and pretty entertaining, but still didn't care that much about the central dilemma or some of the characters. So, as long as we're saying its a charming, surprisingly decent movie and not going all "it's like Princess Bride but WAY BETTER!!!!", okay, I'll allow it.

#23 Posted by Sammo21 (3204 posts) -

@oneidwille:

Thank God. Rush was one of the few things I consistently enjoyed about those films.

#24 Posted by thatdutchguy (1267 posts) -

Yeah it's pretty great.

#25 Posted by Hunter5024 (5514 posts) -

So I watched this because I loved Layer Cake and Kick Ass. A little hesitant because I thought it was supposed to be a kid movie. I was pleasantly surprised though, a very imaginative fantasy world. Whenever I tell people to watch it though they give me funny looks.

#26 Edited by rempresent (98 posts) -

Women (or in this case stars, but in human form) that glow when they are excited or happy is probably one of the most incredible ideas ever.

No joke.

#27 Posted by super2j (1652 posts) -

@rempresent said:

Women (or in this case stars, but in human form) that glow when they are excited or happy is probably one of the most incredible ideas ever.

No joke.

would you elaborate please? I mean i guess other then having a literal gauge to see if what you are doing is effecting her positively. I feel like it would get annoying. ex. "honey stop glowing its 3 am"

#28 Posted by tangmcgame (79 posts) -

damnable_fiend said:

no. no it's not a very good movie. read the illustrated version of the book, instead. and watch Mirrormask.

You don't like Stardust but do like Mirrormask? It's like I'm reading words but instead of words they are hipster glasses.

#29 Posted by Godlyawesomeguy (6385 posts) -

I am so disappointed that this isn't a thread about Stardust Memories.

#30 Posted by falling_fast (2180 posts) -

@tangmcgame said:

damnable_fiend said:

no. no it's not a very good movie. read the illustrated version of the book, instead. and watch Mirrormask.

You don't like Stardust but do like Mirrormask? It's like I'm reading words but instead of words they are hipster glasses.

I like the book Stardust. I just feel like the people who made the movie made a lot of poor decisions. The biggest one being to have that pointless and stupid fight sequence with the witch at the end.

#31 Posted by skittles (156 posts) -

A while ago, an old housemate hired this out for him and his girlfriend to watch. I thought it sounded awful, but I got bored at one point and decided to watch it. I loved everything about it, except for Claire Danes because she is utterly talentless. I think this might have been the first time I really became aware of Mark Strong too, and he's since become one of my favorite actors. There's a montage scene in that film that has this music playing over it, which I find to be particularly epic : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GVjC0GZjsOo

#32 Posted by ItBeStefYo (1021 posts) -

I saw it in the cinema with my mum... Despite that I actually thought it was great, even that garuy bolamnd song felt right in context

#33 Posted by TheJohn (553 posts) -

Neil Gaiman also wrote "Don't Panic" - a pretty good Douglas Adams biography

#34 Posted by super2j (1652 posts) -

@TheJohn said:

Neil Gaiman also wrote "Don't Panic" - a pretty good Douglas Adams biography

Man, if the connections between these two authors is that tight in the public's mind, how is this the first I hear of it.??!?!? I need to get these books, they are pretty inexpensive, i just need to wait like a month to be able to have time and money to throw around.