#1 Edited by Fredchuckdave (6161 posts) -

Pretty great movie, has no exposition, has no character arcs. Ridiculously good dialogue as one might expect from Cormac McCarthy but if you're wondering why it has such divisive ratings (some people absolutely love it, many more don't) it's basically because the way that it tells the story is very non traditional. This isn't Pulp Fiction or Memento, it doesn't have a redesigned version of the same structure, it has no structure other than what one might pick up from the dialogue. So while those two films are widely accepted and praised this one will be mostly decried for now, I'm sure in the future all critics will be fascinated by it (instead of just some), but until then. This is basically just some piece of brilliant writing put forth in a time where few could accept it, and hey its a movie so even less accept it; but that's a pretty common occurrence. At least Mr. Cormac received his due while he lived I'm sure there's many more competent authors who are as of yet completely unknown due to the sorry state of modern literature. Review

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#2 Edited by PandaBear (1384 posts) -

Cool!!

#3 Edited by probablytuna (3829 posts) -

The Counselor is probably my most anticipated movie now that I've seen Gravity. Can't go wrong with the Fass.

#4 Posted by Sinusoidal (1810 posts) -

Is it one of those no-story, constant stream of "deep" dialog movies a la Before Sunrise/Sunset/Midnight? I fucking hate those. It's like watching the screen adaptation of a philosophy 101 textbook.

#5 Posted by Fredchuckdave (6161 posts) -

@sinusoidal: The film is very philosophical but, let's say "interesting," stuff does happen. It has a story but it's more like something that could happen in reality as opposed to a standard cinematic plot.

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#6 Posted by Oldirtybearon (4893 posts) -

With a title like The Counselor I was going to pass, even with the cast. Then I heard Cormac McCarthy wrote it and that definitely has my attention. I'm still not sure if it's worth putting up with a theatre experience (I hate watching movies with people), but I'm definitely considering it now. Though the fact that Ridley Scott directed it makes me shaky on it. That guy... man. That guy can make some fucking boring movies. So I guess my question is, does Cormac's writing make up for Scott's slack?

#7 Posted by leebmx (2235 posts) -

I am now looking forward to this movie even more. The trailer looked very interesting and I love Cormac McCarthy, Fassbender and Ridley Scott is OK I suppose.

Just finished watching The Road about 30mins ago and was literally sobbing on the sofa, hopefully this film will be equally good but not as depressing. I don't think I could take that again.

#8 Posted by Fredchuckdave (6161 posts) -

@leebmx: The Road has a happy ending by Cormac McCarthy standards I think.

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#9 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

@leebmx: The Road has a happy ending by Cormac McCarthy standards I think.

Knowing what I know about The Road, that sounds fucking depressing.

#10 Posted by Oldirtybearon (4893 posts) -

@fredchuckdave: I thought No Country for Old Men ended on a rather positive note. Well, the book does. The movie just kind of cuts out the last act.

#11 Edited by leebmx (2235 posts) -

@leebmx: The Road has a happy ending by Cormac McCarthy standards I think.

I found it the most grim of all his works, but I think that obviously has a lot to do with the overall setting rather than just the end. The end is probably the most hopefull and uplifting part in the whole book (apart from maybe when they discover the food bunker, and of course the love between father and son generally) but yes McCarthy is not someone you got to for cheering up. Great writing, story and characters, but not good cheer. And I don't mind one bit.

#12 Edited by DharmaBum (1049 posts) -

So has Ridley Scott gone back to making good movies?

#13 Edited by Fredchuckdave (6161 posts) -

@leebmx: Yeah whole book is depressing right up until the end (they found the good guys), bunker is like a brief rest period between the rest of the sadness.

@oldirtybearon: No Country isn't really positive in any way unless you're rooting for Anton Chigurh I suppose or really like metaphors for death (book or movie), I mean I guess the random girl he picks up stays alive in the book while the loose caricature of her dies in the movie. The end of the book just sort of tells you that Llewelyn was a sniper in Vietnam and so on.

Another positive review; however they do make the mistake of naming the cartel as some sort of boogieman but the plot of the movie makes more sense if you assume that everything that happens is the result of the actions of the main characters; which the film very strongly implies. Thus the cartel is just a sort of structure around and within which the proceedings happen. A dishonest character isn't going to be direct with their threats and describing their actions.

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#14 Posted by Oldirtybearon (4893 posts) -

@fredchuckdave: It's been awhile since I've read it but I seem to remember the Sheriff getting Anton. Maybe I'm confusing it with something else.

#15 Posted by HistoryInRust (6407 posts) -

McCarthy is arguably America's most legendary living author. His work often demands the reader be open enough to accept or at least entertain certain liberties with narratological structure, with typified moral hierarchies, and with the notion that this world of ours may very well run roughshod over our expectations and hopes.

A throughline of his writing, of all his writing, explores the failing of good will in the face of an inexorable, indifferent, oppressive bleak austerity.

Plainly, I can't wait to see The Counselor. I'm a sucker for anything McCarthy has written.

#16 Posted by Fredchuckdave (6161 posts) -

McCarthy is arguably America's most legendary living author. His work often demands the reader be open enough to accept or at least entertain certain liberties with narratological structure, with typified moral hierarchies, and with the notion that this world of ours may very well run roughshod over our expectations and hopes.

A throughline of his writing, of all his writing, explores the failing of good will in the face of an inexorable, indifferent, oppressive bleak austerity.

Plainly, I can't wait to see The Counselor. I'm a sucker for anything McCarthy has written.

Excellent, that's pretty much the exact mindset you should have when going to see this film.

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