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#1 Edited by Wolverine (4281 posts) -

So, last night I imported a few Russell Brand stand up DVDs from amazon.co.uk. I had previously seen them many times before, but because I think Russell's stand up in England is by far his best I wanted to own the DVDs. What I noticed was that a lot of words used on the British Amazon site are different than the American counterpart. For example, in America you add items to your "cart", in England you add them to your "shopping basket". Also, in America your items get "shipped", in England they get "dispatched". I just thought it was interesting.

#2 Edited by KarlPilkington (2759 posts) -

Although this is an innocent thread, it will/could end horribly.

#3 Posted by Pepeman (112 posts) -
@Chabbs0 said:
" Although this is an innocent thread, it will end horribly. "
#4 Posted by Enigma777 (6078 posts) -

Oi, get of me lawn you bloody wankers or I'll colour your blue till you can't smoke a fag on the lift anymore. 



Don't hate me, I'm just a product of my environment. 
#5 Posted by mfpantst (2574 posts) -

in america you put it in the trunk, in england in the boot.

#6 Posted by KaosAngel (13765 posts) -

As an American learning the ways of British English, I can safely say that the British are overly complex, too complex for their own good.

American English is straight to the point, while being accurate.   When I say I want to use the bathroom, I go like "yo bitches, where's the piss hole?", while in British English they state, "Cheerio good chap, my buttox is in need of emptying, and thus I need to use the room of which I may empty my feces.  God save the Queen."    


As you can see, American English is far more quicker and to the point. Again, it's different cultures so it's understandable.
#7 Posted by phish09 (1110 posts) -

In Soviet Russia, car drives you.

#8 Posted by TheDudeOfGaming (6078 posts) -
@Enigma777 said:
" Oi, get of me lawn you bloody wankers or I'll colour your blue till you can't smoke a fag on the lift anymore. 


Don't hate me, I'm just a product of my environment. 
"
And so it begins!
#9 Posted by Yummylee (22067 posts) -

Lift

Loo
Holiday
D/M/Y
Jelly

 RESPECT

#10 Posted by mutha3 (4986 posts) -
@Pepeman said:
" @Chabbs0 said:
" Although this is an innocent thread, it will end horribly. "
"
#11 Posted by BrickRoad (704 posts) -
@Wolverine:

You mean delivered or dispatched, right? I've never seen 'deployed' I'm afraid, and I'm from Engerloind. That's how we spell it.
 Also, as an Englishman, born in England, I say I speak 'English', not 'British English'. But, if I were American, I'd be saying 'British English' and 'American English'.
#12 Posted by Animasta (14713 posts) -
@KaosAngel said:
" As an American learning the ways of British English, I can safely say that the British are overly complex, too complex for their own good.

American English is straight to the point, while being accurate.   When I say I want to use the bathroom, I go like "yo bitches, where's the piss hole?", while in British English they state, "Yo wanka, where's the piss hole?"
fixed
#13 Posted by Bones8677 (3264 posts) -

British English is stuffy and archaic, American English is streamlined.

#14 Posted by Wolverine (4281 posts) -
@BrickRoad said:
" @Wolverine: You mean delivered or dispatched, right? I've never seen 'deployed' I'm afraid, and I'm from Engerloind. That's how we spell it. Also, as an Englishman, born in England, I say I speak 'English', not 'British English'. But, if I were American, I'd be saying 'British English' and 'American English'. "
Your correct, I made a mistake. It did say dispatched. I'm going to change it now.
#15 Edited by DeeGee (2141 posts) -
@Wolverine said:

" So, last night I imported a few Russell Brand stand up DVDs from amazon.co.uk. I had previously seen them many times before, but because I think Russell's stand up in England is by far his best I wanted to own the DVDs. What I noticed was that a lot of words used on the British Amazon site are different than the American counterpart. For example, in America you add items to your "cart", in England you add them to your "shopping basket". Also, in America your items get "shipped", in England they get "deployed". I just thought it was interesting. "

I'm English and I've never seen anything as "deployed". That just seems silly. We used 'shipped' just like everyone else. Sometimes "dispatched".
#16 Posted by Smallerz (119 posts) -

Ain't no English like the Queen's English.

#17 Posted by Wolverine (4281 posts) -
@DeeGee said:
" @Wolverine said:
" So, last night I imported a few Russell Brand stand up DVDs from amazon.co.uk. I had previously seen them many times before, but because I think Russell's stand up in England is by far his best I wanted to own the DVDs. What I noticed was that a lot of words used on the British Amazon site are different than the American counterpart. For example, in America you add items to your "cart", in England you add them to your "shopping basket". Also, in America your items get "shipped", in England they get "deployed". I just thought it was interesting. "
I'm English and I've never seen anything as "deployed". That just seems silly. We used 'shipped' just like everyone else. "
My bad. It said "dispatched". I edited my original post.

@Laketown said:
" @KaosAngel said:
" As an American learning the ways of British English, I can safely say that the British are overly complex, too complex for their own good.

American English is straight to the point, while being accurate.   When I say I want to use the bathroom, I go like "yo bitches, where's the piss hole?", while in British English they state, "Yo wanka, where's the piss hole?"
fixed "

This made me chuckle.
#18 Posted by Jabbawocky (78 posts) -
@Bones8677 said:
" British English is stuffy and archaic, American English is streamlined. "
You call it streamlined. We call it lazy.
#19 Posted by Animasta (14713 posts) -
@Jabbawocky said:
" @Bones8677 said:
" British English is stuffy and archaic, American English is streamlined. "
You call it streamlined. We call it lazy. "
nobody actually asks where the pisshole is, by the way (anyone who does sucks)
#20 Posted by Wolverine (4281 posts) -
@Jabbawocky said:
" @Bones8677 said:
" British English is stuffy and archaic, American English is streamlined. "
You call it streamlined. We call it lazy. "
@Chabbs0 said:
" Although this is an innocent thread, it will/could end horribly. "
I'm starting to understand why this is going to end horribly.
#21 Posted by KarlPilkington (2759 posts) -
@Wolverine said:
" @Chabbs0 said:
" Although this is an innocent thread, it will/could end horribly. "
I'm starting to understand why this is going to end horribly. "
Yeah, when two things are compared, especially Britain and America, things can go wrong quickly.
#22 Posted by Fallen189 (5036 posts) -

English from England is the real English. American English is the bastardized form because people like this dickhead:


@KaosAngel said:
" As an American learning the ways of British English, I can safely say that the British are overly complex, too complex for their own good.

American English is straight to the point, while being accurate.   When I say I want to use the bathroom, I go like "yo bitches, where's the piss hole?", while in British English they state, "Cheerio good chap, my buttox is in need of emptying, and thus I need to use the room of which I may empty my feces.  God save the Queen."    

As you can see, American English is far more quicker and to the point. Again, it's different cultures so it's understandable.
"
Can't understand sentence structure
#23 Posted by Twisted_Scot (1180 posts) -

Mainly the spelling i notice. I moved to Canada form Scotland bout 6 years back and when I came over my wifes friend told me your wrong to say "im going to the toilet" when its correct to say "Im going to use the washroom". I asked her where my final destination was. Told her I wasn't going to bathe in bathroom, for a rest in a restroom and wasn't going to wash in the washroom but if shed rather get more information on what I'm up to I would gladly tell her I was going for a piss.
It'll be universal when Snoop Dogg becomes the official language of Earth. Amazizzle.com has now de-to-the-spatched yo shiiiiiit.

#24 Posted by mfpantst (2574 posts) -
@Enigma777 said:
" Oi, get of me lawn you bloody wankers or I'll colour your blue till you can't smoke a fag on the lift anymore. 


Don't hate me, I'm just a product of my environment. 
"
Here, I'll translate:
Hey Fuckface- get off my yard before I kill your ass.
#25 Posted by Fajita_Jim (1463 posts) -

I always find it funny how British press (and CBC in Canada) will report someone being taken to the hospital as so:
"He was taken to hospital..."
Whereas in The States it would be:
"He was taken to THE hospital..."
Or more likely along the lines of:
"He was taken to Fort Sanders Hospital for..."
if there is more than one hospital in the city.

#26 Posted by ZombieSpace (286 posts) -

In my country we learn British English, i think its just fine.

#27 Posted by Gabriel (4067 posts) -

One's better for stabbing, ones better for shooting dudes, take your pick.

#28 Posted by Rudeboy217 (1769 posts) -

 "Dispatched" is so British.  

#29 Posted by SuperfluousMoniker (2910 posts) -

They spell 'tire' really weird. Also, I was playing Typing of the Dead recently, and they use British spellings for words like 'colour' and 'favour' which really throws me off. Write American, dammit!

#30 Posted by TaliciaDragonsong (8699 posts) -

I love british english <3

#31 Posted by TheKing (844 posts) -

Everything I know about England I learned from Top Gear.

#32 Posted by TheBlindChessman (241 posts) -

Can I bum a fag?

#33 Posted by MaFoLu (1858 posts) -

After playing Portal 2, I've actually started to like british english more than american...

#34 Posted by Famov (768 posts) -
@Bones8677 said:
" British English is stuffy and archaic, American English is streamlined. "
Not to nitpick, but you cannot streamline a language. Philogy is the study of how and why languages change over time, and other related subjects. It's a complex phenomenon, and British English has (probably) changed just as much as American English over the last 300+ years, to the point that they're both children of a similar form of English so far removed from how anyone speaks anymore that it can be considered something else entirely. At this point I'm just making assumptions because I don't actually know what I'm talking about, but I'll totally vouch for the first two sentences.
#35 Edited by ThatFrood (3377 posts) -
@Fallen189 said:

" English from England is the real English. American English is the bastardized form because people like this dickhead:"

I'm not disagreeing with you about kaos, but actually, American English pronunciation, at the very least, is more like the english spoken in the 17th century than british english. It is all based around the " rhoticity" of the language. Rhoticity is specifically concerned with the "r" sound in languages, as it is easily the most differentiable. English was once a very rhotic language, but lost much of this rhoticity in England. Standard American, however, retained it. This extends to any "o" and "aw" sounds. If one were to be absolutely anal about it, American English is the proper pronunciation of english.

This is made more evident in singing, where non-rhotic singing is uncommon and usually only there to accent regional flavor. Otherwise, english singers, even british ones, sing in American English.

ADDITIONALLY, additionally, this is why "uh" and "er" fulfill similar uses in english. They are both the same word. One is simply a non-rhotic pronunciation of the other.
#36 Posted by KarlPilkington (2759 posts) -
@TheBlindChessman said:
" Can I bum a fag? "
It's fine to do both meanings of that in Britain, maybe not so much in America.
#37 Edited by Dagbiker (6978 posts) -

Do you guys have to give Kate a gift or do you just send her a cheque?

#38 Posted by ch3burashka (5113 posts) -

You mean good English and bad English?

#39 Posted by AlisterCat (5635 posts) -

I've always been strongly pro British English, but the only thing that actually annoys me is the American pronunciation of the letter U as oooooo. It's not ooo, it's you. As in Ubisoft. It's not ooooooooooooooobisoft.

#40 Edited by danimal_furry (1453 posts) -

I have been called an idiot and a biggot and a racist and every other name under the sun for saying this: English is English. There is no difference except accent and slang. It's not that hard to figure out. There is the sample of "crazy" words that gets passed around, but the language is the same. If I typed a correctly spelled sentence using proper terms from American English and sent those to a Brit, the Brit would know what I was saying. It's not freaking rocket science. The only difference is when a person uses slang. The same thing happens between Spain and Mexico (or a South American  country... because Central America is not a continent) with Spanish. Words are brought into use in one country that have no meaning in the other. But if the proper language is used, there is no difference.
#41 Posted by Hailinel (25179 posts) -
@Chabbs0 said:
" Although this is an innocent thread, it will/could end horribly. "
@Enigma777 said:
" Oi, get of me lawn you bloody wankers or I'll colour your blue till you can't smoke a fag on the lift anymore. 


Don't hate me, I'm just a product of my environment. 
"
@KaosAngel said:
" As an American learning the ways of British English, I can safely say that the British are overly complex, too complex for their own good.

American English is straight to the point, while being accurate.   When I say I want to use the bathroom, I go like "yo bitches, where's the piss hole?", while in British English they state, "Cheerio good chap, my buttox is in need of emptying, and thus I need to use the room of which I may empty my feces.  God save the Queen."    

As you can see, American English is far more quicker and to the point. Again, it's different cultures so it's understandable.
"
Well, that didn't take long.
#42 Posted by craigbo180 (1739 posts) -

American English is for stupid people, which works out quite nicely.

#43 Posted by mylifeforAiur (3487 posts) -
@TaliciaDragonsong said:
" I love british english <3 "
Absolutely this! It's one of the many positives aspects of living in a Commonwealth country.
#44 Posted by GamesWarden (59 posts) -
@KaosAngel said:
"American English is far more quicker and to the point. "
erm....    fail?
#45 Posted by GamesWarden (59 posts) -

Also, who ever says 'British English?' I'm English and I speak english, plain and simple.

#46 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -
@Enigma777 said:

" Oi, get of me lawn you bloody wankers or I'll colour your blue till you can't smoke a fag on the lift anymore. 





Don't hate me, I'm just a product of my environment. 
"
You mean the snowy tundras of Alaska?

  
#47 Edited by HitmanAgent47 (8576 posts) -

The difference is when I watch a documentary, I understand what they are saying, that's american english. For british english english, I have to rewind it a hundred times in a row because they stutter and say things so fast like everyone can decode their accent. I mean we call it vitamins, they call it vee ta mins. Imagine watching a documentary on that and hearing it a hundred times and rewinding it constantly. That's all i'm saying. With american english, it's straight to the point.

Then again, I didn't mean to sound like an arse, but in my opinion, rewinding it a hundred times because I though I gone daft, trying to figure things out. I just say, oh bollocks, I can't take this anymore, i'm going to stop watching this documentary and leg it. But then again maybe we should appreciate the english because of the royal wedding, which is cracking, or smashing. But everything is going hunky doory easy peasy for me. Well cheerio.

#48 Posted by dragonface (11 posts) -
@GamesWarden said:
" @KaosAngel said:
"American English is far more quicker and to the point. "
erm....    fail? "
This is just unfortunate.
#49 Edited by M1M1C (64 posts) -
@HitmanAgent47 said:

" I didn't mean to sound like an arse"

MISSION FAILED!

Oh and i would say Vitamins like 'Vih-ta-mins'
Do you pronounce it (in terms of phonetics, but lets not get into all those crazy diacritic things) 'Vi-ta-mins' or with more emphasis on the 'Vi' making it sound more like 'Vy'?
#50 Posted by DeckardLee (27 posts) -

American English is sexy and seductive

British English makes my ears bleed.