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#51 Posted by Zeik (2538 posts) -

@petiew said:

Honestly I could care less. Grammer nazis like you are a diamond dozen. Lets all stop replying and let this thread RIP in peace.

You were being purposely ironic there, right?

#52 Posted by Petiew (1353 posts) -

@zeik: What do you mean? It's a doggy dog world out there, I guess you can't deal with that.

#53 Posted by Broomhitches (173 posts) -

We can all write it all off as small, common mistakes, but it's sad when people--whose native language is not English--can write and speak better than most people I know in the United States. For me, I just have a hard time coming to terms with the fact that some people don't care, mostly because I was forced to fix the little mistakes when I was younger.

#54 Edited by Monkeyman04 (1152 posts) -

@petiew: A Snoop Doggy dog world?

#55 Posted by Belegorm (458 posts) -

I still get annoyed more by people confusing "their" "there" and "they're"

Even more common are people confusing when to use "its" vs "it's" sometimes people don't even know you can write it without an apostrophe.

In the case of a contraction like in "it's" or "don't" or such, the apostrophe shows that you've omitted a letter; the easiest way to know if you should use "it's" is if your sentence makes sense spelling it out fully as "it is." Otherwise it's (it is; see what I did there?) probably going to be "its" without the apostrophe.

I think really the only way to get native and non-native English speakers alike to know grammar is either to be drilled to death by it (which doesn't happen these days, even in junior high schools), or read a lot of books, particularly older books. The only reason I have reasonably decent grammar is that I was a bookworm when I was younger, and then I ended up writing a lot of academic papers.

#56 Posted by RollingZeppelin (2026 posts) -

@grantheaslip said:

"Affect"/"effect" mix-ups are a recurring pet peeve of mine. "Affect" is always a verb, and in most cases "effect" is a noun.

Could you please put these both in a sentence so that I may learn more of this phenomena

You could say something like "I was deeply affected by that movie." So the movie affected me, it did something to me, affect being the verb. "This movie has awesome special effects!" The effects are things I'm noticing, making them a noun. "The side effects from the drug I'm taking are affecting me in strange ways!"

#57 Edited by Zeik (2538 posts) -

@belegorm said:

I still get annoyed more by people confusing "their" "there" and "they're

To be honest, I screw those up all the time. Not because I don't know the difference, but just because of careless typing. I usually catch it quickly, but occasionally it slips through.

#58 Posted by Turambar (6810 posts) -

This thread just kinda makes me want to read Eats, Shoots, and Leaves again.

#59 Posted by RollingZeppelin (2026 posts) -

@canteu: No, if you read my other comments in this thread, I don't expect everyone to be amazing at grammar ( the it's vs its comment). It's just that than vs then is a very simple thing to get right, they're two different words with two different meanings. I would expect someone learning english to have learnt the two words fairly early in their education, so a foreign english speaker who makes this mistake would use very disjointed sentences to the point where it was obvious that they were not fluent. And I bare no judgments towards them, they're welcome to make all the mistakes they need to until they are fluent, but they must also learn the difference too if they ever wish to become fluent.

Native english speakers who make the mistake have no excuse other than laziness and apathy. They're the ones that irritate me, and I honestly disregard their opinion when they make that mistake because how is their opinion of any worth if they put zero effort into conveying it? And then I get agitated because I wasted my time reading a worthless opinion. I want to waste my time reading worthwhile opinions damn it!

#60 Posted by GrantHeaslip (1644 posts) -

@thehumandove said:

@grantheaslip said:

"Affect"/"effect" mix-ups are a recurring pet peeve of mine. "Affect" is always a verb, and in most cases "effect" is a noun.

Could you please put these both in a sentence so that I may learn more of this phenomena

You could say something like "I was deeply affected by that movie." So the movie affected me, it did something to me, affect being the verb. "This movie has awesome special effects!" The effects are things I'm noticing, making them a noun. "The side effects from the drug I'm taking are affecting me in strange ways!"

There's also a rare verb form of "effect" that means something along the lines of "caused". The most common use is "X effected change in Y." I sometimes have to double-check that I'm using the right word, and I think that confusion is rooted in that stupid exception.

#61 Posted by TyCobb (1972 posts) -

@zeik said:

@petiew said:

Honestly I could care less. Grammer nazis like you are a diamond dozen. Lets all stop replying and let this thread RIP in peace.

You were being purposely ironic there, right?

I am assuming so since there are a ton of other issues. In case you missed them, I underlined them.

#63 Posted by NTM (7479 posts) -

You know, I've seen it so much by now, it doesn't bother me much unless what's written is either so unreadable in the first place (which I just don't respond to), or if everything else is written well but there are those few problems. I also expect reviewers to do well in writing as well, which can somewhat bother me if they get it wrong, though to a small extent.

#64 Posted by Hunter5024 (5809 posts) -

When I'm talking on a forum I like to keep it chlax and low key. So I usually don't proofread, and I don't always correct grammatical errors even when I do notice them. I am not a monster. As far as I'm concerned if you understand what someone was trying to say, then they did they're job.

That was intentional.

#65 Posted by NTM (7479 posts) -

@tycobb said:

@zeik said:

@petiew said:

Honestly I could care less. Grammer nazis like you are a diamond dozen. Lets all stop replying and let this thread RIP in peace.

You were being purposely ironic there, right?

I am assuming so since there are a ton of other issues. In case you missed them, I underlined them.

Yeah, I noticed that too, but I don't think it was on purpose.

#66 Edited by tourgen (4542 posts) -

@petiew said:

@zeik:

What do you mean? It's a doggy dog world out there

, I guess you can't deal with that.

oh man I am using this. this is gold. it's going to tie just the right people up in knots when they hear it.

#67 Posted by Ravenlight (8040 posts) -

@white said:

Want some advice on how to advise people? Don't.

Us grammar nazi(s) (what's plural for Nazi?) are a minority. The majority doesn't give a shit as long as the meaning was conveyed, spelling/usage be damned.

I prefer the term "Grammar Fascist."

#68 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

I prefer the term "Grammar Fascist."

Because you can use this face to yell at people who don't know when to use that or which, right?

#69 Posted by Ravenlight (8040 posts) -

@video_game_king:

I think the gun-vomiting head from Zardoz would be a better fit.

#70 Edited by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

@ravenlight:

Mussolini didn't live in Zardoz. Why not?

#71 Posted by Bribo (605 posts) -

Get over it, looser.

#72 Posted by CornBREDX (5623 posts) -

I love people who whine about other people's grammar and then do so by using poor grammar.

I wouldn't normally say anything but that is the point of this thread.

This thread is worse than people that have bad grammar.

@petiew said:

Honestly I could care less. Grammer nazis like you are a diamond dozen. Lets all stop replying and let this thread RIP in peace.

The saying is "dime a dozen." Meaning cheaply procured.

RIP means "rest in peace" so you said "in peace" twice there.

Sorry, I couldn't help myself.

#73 Edited by Subjugation (4725 posts) -

ITT: People getting mad about the fact they can't use english correctly and people are calling them on it. The excuses are particularly entertaining.

#74 Edited by Redbullet685 (6054 posts) -

The worst thing is when people type "would of" or "could of" etc. when trying to say "would've" or "could've" etc. I don't get why this is a thing

#75 Edited by Kovie (206 posts) -
#76 Posted by MonetaryDread (2074 posts) -

@geraltitude: I'm sorry if you think expecting people to utilise knowledge gained in god damn elementary school is egotistical.

I mean this is BASIC grammar, it's not one of those weird parts of the English language like not using an apostrophe on 'its' when using it as a possessive pronoun because 'it's' can only mean 'it is'.

The reason why people hate grammar-Nazi's is because it amounts to absolutely nothing but a humble-brag. Its seen as egotistical because, in the grand scheme of things, minor grammatical errors are one of the most insignificant errors out there. Then someone goes out and attempts to shame the OP despite the fact that the original text is almost always on something insignificant, like Facebook or some gaming forum. If this was someones dissertation or a letter to your grandmother, sure grammar would be a little more important, but it isn't the end of the world. Its just the internet.

#77 Posted by Canteu (2821 posts) -

@petiew Well played. These guys are dumb.

Poe's Law in full effect always on these forums. Always.

#78 Posted by Jothel (934 posts) -

People use "your" instead of "you're" so much that whenever I see "your" being properly used, I automatically think it's wrong.

#79 Posted by mosespippy (4285 posts) -

After all these posts and all this time no one has posted that clip from The Wire. You guys disappoint me.

#80 Posted by Apparatus_Unearth (3196 posts) -

This one doesn't bother me as much as spelling "definitely" as "defiantly". How the hell do you make that mistake, anyway? I'm looking at a keyboard and I just don't see how that's possible. And the latter is a DIFFERENT. FUCKING. WORD.

That one's the fucking worst!

#81 Posted by ajamafalous (12035 posts) -

I love people who whine about other people's grammar and then do so by using poor grammar.

I wouldn't normally say anything but that is the point of this thread.

This thread is worse than people that have bad grammar.

@petiew said:

Honestly I could care less. Grammer nazis like you are a diamond dozen. Lets all stop replying and let this thread RIP in peace.

The saying is "dime a dozen." Meaning cheaply procured.

RIP means "rest in peace" so you said "in peace" twice there.

Sorry, I couldn't help myself.

Of all the obvious troll posts in this thread, you decided to bite on his?

@tourgen said:

@petiew said:

@zeik:

What do you mean? It's a doggy dog world out there

, I guess you can't deal with that.

oh man I am using this. this is gold. it's going to tie just the right people up in knots when they hear it.

Feel free to also use "low self of steam" and thank my high school English teacher for showing our class an essay in which it was used.

#82 Posted by CornBREDX (5623 posts) -

@ajamafalous: I was just having fun, as was that person from what I could tell. Why not? haha