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#51 Posted by mylifeforAiur (3483 posts) -

The Third Reich in Power by Richard J. Evans.

#52 Posted by NinjatheKid (71 posts) -

@Twilight said:

Different Seasons by Stephen King. First time reading a King novel.

I'm also reading my first Stephen King novel. Mine's The Shining though.

@thehexeditor said:

1Q84 by Haruki Murakami.

It's alright. Definitely not for everyone.

That's going to be my next book. I highly enjoyed The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle (also not for everyone), so I'm really looking forward to 1Q84.

#53 Posted by JohnTheGamer (341 posts) -

Thus Spoke Zarathustra courtesy of Friedrich Nietzsche.

#54 Posted by blindisaac (141 posts) -

Divine Misfortune by A. Lee Martinez. I just finished it and it was great like the rest of his work. The Damned Busters is next up on my queue.

#55 Posted by natetodamax (19205 posts) -
@SpartyOn
#56 Posted by EightBitShik (1334 posts) -

@BraveToaster: No they aren't dark at all. The only thing I have finished reading by him so far is the Mistborn trilogy. I loved it, if you like fantasy at all set in a world with a completely different kind of "Magic" system that is utterly unique give it shot. A new twist with this Alloy of law is that the first 3 books are fantasy next 4 are "1930's 40's kind of steam punk" and then the last however many will be star wars future like. I really enjoyed the "universe".

#57 Posted by GeneralZod37 (262 posts) -

Just finished two books yesterday.

The first was Micro, by Michael Crichton and Richard Preston. I found it rather eh. It was basically "Honey, I Shrunk The Kids," but more adult. I just didn't care about what was going on. I am guessing this is something Mr. Preston does in his books, but it seemed like every or every other time a character was brought up their full name was used. Maybe a lot of authors do it, and I've never noticed it before, but it made the characters really hard to connect to.

Also there was a really shitty tag at the end that hinted at a sequel.

The second one was The Destiny of the Republic, by Candice Millard. The book was amazing! It is a historical narrative about James A. Garfield, his life, and more importantly, his assassination. I'm not one for history books, but Mrs. Millard did an astounding job. I can't speak too highly of it.

As for right now, I am probably going to read The Labors of Hercules, by Agatha Christie or The Light Fantastic, by Terry Pratchett.

#58 Posted by BraveToaster (12590 posts) -

@EightBitShik said:

@BraveToaster: No they aren't dark at all. The only thing I have finished reading by him so far is the Mistborn trilogy. I loved it, if you like fantasy at all set in a world with a completely different kind of "Magic" system that is utterly unique give it shot. A new twist with this Alloy of law is that the first 3 books are fantasy next 4 are "1930's 40's kind of steam punk" and then the last however many will be star wars future like. I really enjoyed the "universe".

I like new magic systems. I've been compiling a wishlist of fantasy/sci-fi books on Amazon. I've made the mistake of buying a few fantasy books that were cheesy and tween-oriented, but they were supposedly adult books.

#59 Posted by nohthink (1223 posts) -

1Q84

#60 Posted by OneKillWonder_ (1744 posts) -

Just got the fifth book in E.E. Knight's Vampire Earth series today, so I'm just beginning that. It's an extremely good series, for anyone who's into the post-apocalyptic/horror/sci-fi/military genres.

#61 Posted by SaffronRevolution (35 posts) -

I read several books at once usually. I'm crazy like that.

#62 Posted by CannonGoose (373 posts) -

The Steve Jobs biography and One Piece manga.

#63 Posted by SaffronRevolution (35 posts) -

@oatz: Hitch 22, best accompanied with Johnny Walker Green Label Scotch Whiskey. It's what Hitch would want.

#64 Edited by Eviternal (193 posts) -

Just finished The Death of Bunny Munro by Nick Cave. If you're not familiar with Cave's musical work (Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds) then I'd suggest you give them a listen first; their discography is depraved and tender in equal measures, as is Cave's novel. Cave's previous book And the Ass Saw the Angel is written in a more classical style - if you like older works then I'd suggest you begin there instead.

Also, if you haven't read Alan Moore's Watchmen - do. (Seeing the film does not count!)

#65 Posted by AndrewBeardsley (371 posts) -

Ive been reading the moral landscape by Sam Harris and The god delusion by Richard Dawkins.

Just finished the Steve Jobs biography as well

#66 Posted by SaffronRevolution (35 posts) -

@Eviternal: Was it Grinderman that broke up or Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds? What does it mean for Dirty Three?

#67 Posted by BaneFireLord (2934 posts) -

I finished The Night Eternal by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan yesterday. It was good, but took an incredibly out of place Biblical twist toward the end that was pretty jarring, compared with the more scientific elements of the previous books in the trilogy. 
 
Currently, I'm reading Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness and am about to start Terry Pratchett's latest book Snuff.

#68 Posted by BabyChooChoo (4487 posts) -

Mistborn book 3. I thought book 2 was complete garbage up until the last section so I'm fucking storming my way through the last book because I need to know what happens.

#69 Posted by theguy (796 posts) -

Crime and Punishment and a collection of Asimov's robot stories.

#70 Posted by nintendoeats (5975 posts) -

Aside from the fact that I am slowly working through everything that Orwell has ever written (I'm probably about a quarter of the way through), It''s just school stuff from here on out. I'm majoring in philosophy so school reading is a substantial thing.

#71 Posted by Dany (7887 posts) -

@theguy: How do you like Crime and Punishment?

#72 Posted by Joeybagad0nutz (1438 posts) -

Patriots novel of survival in the coming collapse

#73 Posted by matronedea (2 posts) -

Just finished The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and The Girl who Played with Fire, now I'm reading the last book.

Any recommendations for what to read after I finish these?

#74 Posted by LaserGreen (52 posts) -

Yesterday I started reading Frank Herbert's Dune for the first time.

#75 Posted by Masni (12 posts) -

I don't like books to much but i just start reading Fifth Profession from David Morrell (Author of Rambo books)

#76 Posted by theguy (796 posts) -

@Dany said:

@theguy: How do you like Crime and Punishment?

From what I had heard I thought it would be a dense, essay like, look at morality but I was pleasantly surprised. It's entertaining and easy to read (though I suppose that depends on your translation). I can definitely see why it's praised so much, so far its brilliant.

#77 Edited by Brendan (7805 posts) -

The 33 Strategies of War, by Robert Greene. MwuahahahahahahahAHAHAHAHAHA

It actually does have a lot of interesting historical stories though, despite it's heavy Machiavellian leanings.

#78 Posted by Ksaw (343 posts) -

@Breadfan said:

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy.

Me too. Thought it was funny that one of the Russian spies uses Gerstmann as a cover name. That isn't a spoiler by the way, in case you're not that far into the book,

#79 Posted by Gearhead (2251 posts) -

I'm reading the Hunger Games books for a college English class...They're alright. The setting and the action scenes are pretty entertaining but the bullshit romantic moments that are littered throughout the books can be awful at times. Not enough to ruin the books completely but enough to really diminish me recommending them to anyone.

#80 Posted by DillonWerner (1528 posts) -

Clock Work Orange for school and The Wheel of Time series for fun.

#81 Posted by blindisaac (141 posts) -

I am also reading tons of comics after getting into them back in October. I am currently catching up on Uncanny X-Force with the hardcovers and need to start reading the Invincible Compendium as well as reading my stack of new issues I bought yesterday.

#82 Posted by HisDudeness (252 posts) -

The first Game of Thrones book, it's great.@Twilight said:

Different Seasons by Stephen King. First time reading a King novel.

Just finished the first short story which is Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption. Really enjoyed reading through it, and while I prefer the film, the short story was also quite brilliant. About a quarter through the second short story (Apt Pupil) right now.

As a big King fan, I must say that Different Seasons is easily one of his best, and it also was the first book I read from him. Apt Pupil is fucked up

#83 Posted by ThePickle (4182 posts) -

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley.

#84 Posted by MariachiMacabre (7096 posts) -

@SpartyOn said:

This for me as well. Fascinating book, even from the perspective of a PC user.

#85 Posted by ArcLyte (884 posts) -
#86 Posted by Skytylz (4033 posts) -

I'm reading Atlas Shrugged, it's good buts it's not the most gripping book I've ever read.

#87 Posted by ArcLyte (884 posts) -

@StingerMK2: *shels is a great band!

#88 Posted by TheFakePsychic (194 posts) -

A combination of 12th grade High School lit (which makes me literally want to tear my eyes out, or come up with the most insane theories on interpretations, because I hate literary analysis with a deep-seated, burning passion), and Andrew Rollings and Ernest Adams on Game Design, which is a much more delightful, enjoyable, and interesting book.

#89 Posted by Ctmskater75 (31 posts) -

Good Omens by Neil Gaiman

#90 Posted by louiedog (2335 posts) -

I'm just starting Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea by Barbara Demick.

#91 Posted by MightyDuck (1522 posts) -

Just finished reading Kerry Fraser's book from last year about his career being a referee in the NHL. Great book for any hockey fans out there!

#92 Posted by xMP44x (2193 posts) -

@ThePickle said:

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley.

This is a book that's really caught my attention, but I haven't yet read it. Since it was meant to be one of the books that inspired George Orwell, I'm curious to read it for myself. I've read a few things about it on Wikipedia but I avoided reading anything to spoil the story. How are you finding it?

@TheFakePsychic said:

(which makes me literally want to tear my eyes out, or come up with the most insane theories on interpretations, because I hate literary analysis with a deep-seated, burning passion)

I enjoy literary analysis but I can definitely understand your thoughts on it. The books we analyse are the sort of thing that simply isn't worth analysing in some cases. In my English Lit class we have to analyse poems from Seamus Heaney, and his favorite topic? Farming. You know you're living in Ireland when you're discussing farming's merits, though I have to admit, he manages to make it somewhere approaching interesting because of how strange you can go in your analysis. Making up stupid interpretations can work as well since you can be deemed creative for it even if you're doing it more out of sarcasm than anything. I'd recommend it if you're already doing well in the subject.

#93 Posted by ThePickle (4182 posts) -

@xMP44x: I'm really enjoying it. The first chapter grabbed the hell out of me and refused to let go. It's perfect satire.

#94 Posted by JaredA (824 posts) -

Finishing up The Girl Who Played with Fire, then I am starting on Game of Thrones!

#95 Edited by xMP44x (2193 posts) -

@ThePickle said:

@xMP44x: I'm really enjoying it. The first chapter grabbed the hell out of me and refused to let go. It's perfect satire.

This is very good for me to hear. It seemed like a great book but I'm wanting to read more dystopian fiction so I'd probably be happy enough to read it even if you said it was terrible.

@JaredA said:

Finishing up The Girl Who Played with Fire, then I am starting on Game of Thrones!

The Girl Who Played With Fire is a book I haven't read yet but from the comments I've seen it's divisive. Some people say it is fantastic and then others say it is drawn out and very little happens in it. Since you've actually read it though and I haven't, how are you finding the book?

#96 Posted by fenixREVOLUTION (735 posts) -

Leviathan Wakes by James S. A. Corey

Was just lulling along the first few chapters, then craziness happens and it's been interesting since.

#97 Posted by Christoffer (1816 posts) -

I'm reading Patrick Rothfuss's The name of the Wind. Thanks to Will Smith who tipped me off. It's mostly amazing, even though I'm kind of tired of fantasy.

#98 Posted by yoshisaur (2722 posts) -

Currently I am on the second novel in the Sin War trilogy for Diablo, liking it so far. Thinking about diving into the Warhammer 40k, or maybe even regular Warhammer if there are any, after that. Never been a fan of anything "down-to-earth." Always get taken away when I read about elves and fantasy and I don't think that will ever stop :P

#99 Posted by Encephalon (1260 posts) -

Prince of Fire by Daniel Silva. What can I say, I love the spy genre. Looking to switch over to something a bit weightier next, maybe re-read Black Boy again.

#100 Posted by JaredA (824 posts) -

@xMP44x: It's definitely not as good as the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, but I wouldn't call it boring.