#1 Posted by sunitalee (6 posts) -

Korea,japanese,spanish,french;i am idle so i wanna learn a language.anyone can give me some opinion.Hope which can help you find good job.

#2 Posted by EVO (3909 posts) -

I'd learn Mandarin, in preparation for the inevitable world domination of China.

#3 Posted by gamefreak9 (2359 posts) -

I'd second mandarin if its for job purposes. Foreigners are wanted over there.

#4 Posted by Tonylope (194 posts) -

Like the other guys said, if this is just to get better job prospects, learning Mandarin Chinese would probably be the best option. However, I think you should try and find a language that you are passionate about. That way it's so much more enjoyable, and you're more likely to make good progress.

#5 Edited by aceofspudz (938 posts) -

Spanish...French...German. You stand a chance of actually learning these languages in your spare time. Don't pick an asian language unless you basically want it to dominate your life.

Also, judging from your post, you might want to consider getting better at English.

#6 Edited by CL60 (16906 posts) -

@aceofspudz said:

Spanish...French...German. You stand a chance of actually learning these languages in your spare time. Don't pick an asian language unless you basically want it to dominate your life.

Also, judging from your post, you might want to consider getting better at English.

Not necessarily, Korean isn't really that difficult after you wrap your head around the grammar. You can learn to read Korean in like a day.

But you wont be able to learn any language unless you really have a reason to, if you aren't motivated to learn it, it's just not going to happen.

#7 Edited by Sooty (8082 posts) -

Mandarin and Japanese are both excellent for future job prospects.

Well you can say that for almost any Asian language since English teachers are more and more valued, but then again you don't have to speak the countries native language to do that.

Edit: Don't bother learning any language with a different writing system unless you are absolutely serious because otherwise you'll give up within a week.

@aceofspudz said:

Don't pick an asian language unless you basically want it to dominate your life.

That's really not true, sure they are difficult but the bulk of their difficulty comes from learning the different characters, Korean is much easier in this department where as Mandarin is at the other end of the scale, Japanese is a good middle ground.

Although it must be said that Mandarin pronunciation is fucking hard, Japanese is easy and Korean sits in the middle. (Well that's what I think)

#8 Posted by CL60 (16906 posts) -

@Sooty said:

unless you basically want it to dominate your life.

That's really not true, sure they are difficult but the bulk of their difficulty comes from learning the different characters, Korean is much easier in this department where as Mandarin is at the other end of the scale, Japanese is a good middle ground.

Although it must be said that Mandarin pronunciation is fucking hard, Japanese is easy and Korean sits in the middle. (Well that's what I think)

I think reading and writing Korean is actually easier than English to be honest. I learned how in about a day.

#9 Posted by JJWeatherman (14558 posts) -

E-English?

#10 Posted by charlie_victor_bravo (1012 posts) -

Objective-C. Easier than most of the languages you have listed.

#11 Posted by aceofspudz (938 posts) -

@CL60 said:

@aceofspudz said:

Spanish...French...German. You stand a chance of actually learning these languages in your spare time. Don't pick an asian language unless you basically want it to dominate your life.

Also, judging from your post, you might want to consider getting better at English.

Not necessarily, Korean isn't really that difficult after you wrap your head around the grammar. You can learn to read Korean in like a day.

But you wont be able to learn any language unless you really have a reason to, if you aren't motivated to learn it, it's just not going to happen.

I learned the Korean alphabet on a lazy Saturday morning a few weeks ago. It's really the antithesis of the chinese writing system, which was designed specifically to be obtuse and elitist.

#12 Posted by Drebin_893 (2915 posts) -

I'd say English?

#13 Posted by Metric_Outlaw (1172 posts) -

It depends on where you live and what you intend to do. Also your age as well. I took French in high school and when I worked at a theme park later on that was an incredibly useful skill. I would say if you plan on living in the southern US it would be useful to know some Spanish. If you plan on leaving the US or work in international business then Mandarin can be super useful.

#14 Posted by forkboy (1151 posts) -

Honestly, as the fella above mentioned, it's impossible to say what the right language to learn would be without knowing what you want to use it for. Do you plan on moving to said country? Work as a translator? In the UK there's lots of opportunities for people who can speak Polish & English in translating, presumably for courts & the like. Or you could get the pre-requisite qualifications to teach English as a foreign language in numerous countries (my sister has done this for a year in Barcelona, & is currently in her second year in Chile doing this) & go to where you fancy, because you will pick up the language more living in among people who use it on a daily basis.

#15 Posted by BabyChooChoo (4516 posts) -

@charlie_victor_bravo said:

Objective-C. Easier than most of the languages you have listed.

Fuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuck. I was dying to make this same joke lol

#16 Posted by supamon (1333 posts) -

As a chinese, I can tell you learning to write mandarin and speaking it are two different things. Can't deny its usefulness if you intend to do business in Hong Kong/Taipei of course.

#17 Posted by Sweep (8861 posts) -

Japanese. So you can watch old Japanese films without shitty dubbing.

Moderator
#18 Posted by Cramsy (1168 posts) -

I've been studying Mandarin for a while. It's really rewarding but also a fuck-ton of work. If you want something to sink your teeth into and really stretch then go for Mandarin!

#19 Edited by I_smell (3924 posts) -

Caelondian.
 
And then tell me what this bandana says.

#20 Posted by RollingZeppelin (1975 posts) -

If you want a job in Canada, knowing French is a huge advantage.

#21 Posted by glasswall52 (70 posts) -

Russian. The alphabet may look intimidating, but it's actually much simpler than the Latin alphabet (in the case of English).

#22 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

...Whatever the hell you want?

#23 Posted by psylah (2177 posts) -

I'd say Korean, we have better relations (business and political) with Korea than with China, and learning japanese is soooo 1990's.

#24 Posted by Fredchuckdave (5488 posts) -

Mandarin so you can read Three Kingdoms untranslated

#25 Posted by Azteck (7449 posts) -

How grammar works in most western languages?

#26 Posted by matti00 (668 posts) -

I've been thinking recently that French, Spanish or German would be fun to learn, just because they look easy and can come in useful in everyday life.

On the other hand, I learnt some Icelandic for my recent visit, and when people understood me and mistook me for a native, I felt like a fucking boss.

#27 Posted by Guided_By_Tigers (8061 posts) -

Mandarin is the most practical, especially if you're going into business.

#28 Posted by stinky (1549 posts) -
@CL60 said:


But you wont be able to learn any language unless you really have a reason to, if you aren't motivated to learn it, it's just not going to happen.

exactly.
do the language that you can apply and use, that is if you want to actually learn it. 
 
if its just an exercise in learning, want to pick up a few things out of fun, pick whatever interests you. as you are giving a list on a message board i will assume none of them actually hold value to you.
#29 Posted by BirdkeeperDan (400 posts) -

If you don't have a lot of experience learning a new language I would recommend the easiest one possible for an english speaker: german. I mean you may not think it's the most attractive option for other reasons but given that failure to learn anything significant is a real concern I'd really recommend trying the easiest option.

Also Eastern languages are typically much more difficult than western ones, for english speaker. Hell I had a friend from Japan that said he had a harder time learning his own language than learning English.

#30 Posted by IzzyGraze (850 posts) -

What is your first language? That'll determine how easy it'll be.

But yeah, tons of people are learning Mandarin since China's economy is getting stronger. For Canada I'd also say French. Other than that it'll depend on where you live or are planning on going.

#31 Posted by Phatmac (5726 posts) -

Where are you from? That's help as you should learn languages from countries close to you.

#32 Posted by inappropriate_touchscreen (58 posts) -

For practical purposes, I'd recommend Mandarin Chinese. You'll find lots of English speakers in Western countries, but if you happen to be visiting Asia, you'll be able to find Mandarin speaking people in China, Singapore, Thailand, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, etc.

Plus, Chinese grammar is pretty simple, drag-and-drop words to form sentences kinda thing, so it's easier to pick up quickly than if a non-English speaker were to try and learn English.

#33 Posted by Bourbon_Warrior (4523 posts) -

Madarin so you can hear what they are saying behind your back.

#34 Posted by InternetCrab (1504 posts) -

Mandarin or Spanish if you want to have use for the language.

All countries in America except 3 speak Spanish, but China is also a great power.

I would prefer Spanish though.

#35 Posted by InsidiousBliss (38 posts) -

@glasswall52: I am trying to learn Russian for my wife and her family. Maybe it is just me, but it seems a lot more difficult than other languages I have studied. Maybe it is because I am using Rosetta Stone instead of a classroom setting.

#36 Posted by Apparatus_Unearth (3153 posts) -

I'd perfect your English first. :)

#37 Posted by Ravenlight (8040 posts) -

American Sign Language.