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#1 Posted by mlarrabee (2761 posts) -

I watch The Departed about a month ago. Yeah, I'm a bit late. It held me all the way through and it's one of four movies that have caused me to sit in silence for a length of time after seeing them.

In my opinion, Martin Scorsese is to directing what Ernest Hemingway was to writing. Direct, stable, and succinct, they both present their stories with meticulous precision, trimmed of fat and dripping with the juice of firm internals. (To be fair, I haven't seen Shutter Island, though it is on my list.)

And he knows how to pick leading actors. Between Mean Streets and Taxi Driver, Scorsese had a hand in helping De Niro become the revered actor he is.

So, who's your favorite movie director, and why?

#2 Posted by csl316 (7381 posts) -

I tend to enjoy Ridley Scott movies. They just have a high degree of care put into each frame.

#3 Edited by ShadowConqueror (2997 posts) -

Martin Scorsese, man. No question. The man knows how to tell stories cinematically.

Other than him, the Coen Brothers and Paul Thomas Anderson are pretty phenomenal as well.

#4 Posted by MariachiMacabre (6939 posts) -

Yeah, I'm gonna go with Scorsese as well. He's brilliant.

I also really like Tarantino.

#5 Posted by bmehlers (127 posts) -

I've become a big fan of Nolan. I know that seems like the popular answer these days, but I just find his movies really entertaining. Although my favorite of his is The Prestige, which is different than most people. I'm also a big fan of Scorsese and Scott as well.

#6 Posted by narujoe93 (2458 posts) -

Whenever I think about great movies, Stanley Kubricks body of work is the first thing to jump to my mind. He's my personsal favorite, but not everyone feels that way

Scorsese is amazing; goodfellas and king of comedy (which is very overlooked) are some of the best films ever made.

When it comes to younger directors, the ones who are currently on top, David Fincher is hands down the best.

#7 Posted by Hunter5024 (5180 posts) -

My favorites are Scorcese, Tarantino, Nolan, The Coens, Rian Johnson, Wes Anderson, Edgar Wright, and Hayao Miyazaki. Not a super original list, but people become popular for a reason.

#8 Edited by mlarrabee (2761 posts) -

@bmehlers said:

I've become a big fan of Nolan. I know that seems like the popular answer these days, but I just find his movies really entertaining. Although my favorite of his is The Prestige, which is different than most people. I'm also a big fan of Scorsese and Scott as well.

I think Nolan is as close to a successor to Scorsese as I've seen. While his on-screen action is a little more fluid, his camera direction has that deft decisiveness that I love in Scorsese. (You'll have to forgive my terminology; I've taken no classes in media or film.)

EDIT:

@naru_joe93: I didn't realize that Fincher is the EP of House of Cards. He's certainly had a tumultuous career, with Alien 3 and Fight Club, and the aftershocks of Panic Room.

#10 Posted by Vanick (276 posts) -

David Fincher is my favorite. To me all of his movies are well directed and visually beautiful. Se7en is probably one of my favorite movies. Martin Scorsese, Wes Anderson, and P.T. Anderson are all up there too.

#11 Posted by Aetheldod (3343 posts) -

Stanley Kubrick , he is a master of film making , Mamoru Oshii (Ghost in the Shell) cause I like his style of films , Carl Theodor Dreyer , his film of passion of Joan Ark has inpired me a lot and also Werner Herzog for his "I dont care if you like it, im making a film thata I want" attitude.

#12 Edited by MrHadouken (156 posts) -

I'd love to go with Tarantino or Kubrick, since I love all of their films. However, I am going to say Darren Aronofsky. Pi is one of the greatest films and is really underrated, as well as The fountain. Cannot wait to see what he does next.

#13 Posted by JaredA (806 posts) -

Hmm... Probably Edgar Wright...

#14 Edited by JaredA (806 posts) -

Hmm... Probably Edgar Wright...

#15 Posted by mercutio123 (454 posts) -

I love everything Fincher does, Social Network really grabbed me when I saw it. Also I like Alien 3. Yeah I said it. But I can listen to Tarantino's dialogue forever, I've always loved his commitment of not moving a scene forward without making it interesting.

#16 Edited by Sinusoidal (1156 posts) -

As far as serious movies are concerned, I can appreciate a good Kubrick, Fellini, Kim Gi Deok, Shane Carruth (I haven't seen Upstream Color yet, but Primer was brilliant), Tarantino, Aronofsky, etc flick. But, when it comes to movies, I'm really not picky. I get just as much enjoyment out of some low-budget, b-grade horror movie as the latest Oscar winner.

#17 Edited by Castiel (2421 posts) -

I'm pleasantly surprised to see so many mention Stanley Kubrick. The more I think about it, the more I become certain that he is my favorite director. Of course I don't like all his movies equally, but they are atleast interesting, and that's more than you can say about most directors.

What I like most about Kubrick is his uncompromising approach to achieve what he wanted artistically.

My second favorite director might be Steven Spielberg. Yeah I know, Kubrick and Spielberg aren't the most original answers, but it's the truth. Spielberg played a big part in my childhood and it was movies like the original three Indy movies, E.T., Jurassic Park and Jaws that piqued my interest in movies. Not to mention all the movies he was a producer on like Gremlins and The Goonies etc.

I also liked Tim Burton pre 2000, Big Fish is okay, but I don't have quite the same interest in him any more. My favorite movie of his is a draw between Beetlejuice and Sleepy Hollow. I do really love Nightmare, but I see that to be Henry Selick's achievement just as much as Burton's.

Alfred Hitchcock of course. Again maybe not a original answer, but I love his work. He had an understanding of building suspense like no one else. He was of course also the inventor of the MacGuffin, a plot device which has been used in multiple movies. I still haven't seen most of his movies but what I have seen is mostly brilliant.

Werner Herzog. The man is mad but I absolutely love him for it. He makes great fiction and great documentaries and you have to love the accent. That iconic accent.

John Carpenter. The Thing is one of my favorite movies and Halloween is one hell of a movie.

So yeah there you have it. If I have to sum it up in a top 3 it would probably look like this:

1. Kubrick (Best movie: Tie between The Shining, Paths of Glory, Dr. Strangelove and Clockwork Orange)

2. Spielberg (Best movie: Jaws)

3. John Carpenter (Best movie: The Thing)

Worthy mentions: Alfred Hitchcock, Werner Herzog, Tarantino (his best work is True Romance, which he wrote but didn't direct), David Fincher (That Se7en is pretty rad), Luc Besson (solely because of Leon: The Professional), Tim Burton (most of his early stuff), Ridley Scott (Blade Runner and Alien, don't like his later stuff), James Cameron (Aliens and T2) and John Hughes (the king of teen movies).

#18 Edited by jimmy_p (278 posts) -
Kubrick

although I'm dissapointed nobody mentioned Barry Lyndon

and for OP and anyone who liked the Departed, I suggest Infernal Affairs, which is the original Korean movie (great way to get into Asian cinema, and in my opinion, a better ending than the Departed)

#19 Edited by BeachThunder (11275 posts) -

It's a tossup between Joel Coen & Ethan Coen.

#21 Posted by HorseFactory (98 posts) -

Couldn't choose one.
Cronenberg, Carpenter, Lynch, Wong Kar Wai, Gaspar Noe, Nicholas Winding-Refn, Rodriguez, Tarantino

#22 Edited by Liquidus (940 posts) -

Definitely Kubrick. Incredible filmography across several genres and each one is so goddamn well shot. He's made my favorite sci-fi movie with 2001, my favorite comedy with Dr.Strangelove, one of my favorite horror movies with The Shining and two of the greatest war films with Paths of Glory and Full Metal Jacket(to a lesser extent but still pretty damn good). I love the methodical nature of every aspect of his films especially the pacing which might be slow for a lot of people nowadays but for me, it helps for the movie to reach deep into your subconscious and pull something out of there. Even his movies that I'm not totally in love with (Barry Lyndon and Eyes Wide Shut) I still REALLY like and appreciate the artistry behind every frame. Barry Lyndon is a gorgeous movie to watch, which can be said for any Kubrick film, but especially with this one. I need to rewatch Eyes Wide Shut sometime soon, it's been a while since I last saw it.

#23 Edited by Tofford (523 posts) -

@jareda said:

Hmm... Probably Edgar Wright...

I agree. Although I'm also a big fan of Nolan, Scorsese. Duncan Jones is fast becoming one of the best although WOW will be his big test.

#24 Posted by falserelic (4954 posts) -

Don't have one....

#25 Edited by Claude (16251 posts) -

David Lynch is my favorite director. Only because he directed some of my favorite films. Blue Velvet being the top of a pretty long list. Oh, and Twin Peaks was pretty rad.

Let's fuck!

#26 Posted by Svenzon (699 posts) -

Tough choice. I love Martin Scorsese, Robert Altman and Akira Kurosawa, but can't decide which of them is my all-time favorite.

#27 Edited by Pr1mus (3523 posts) -

Michael Mann and Christopher Nolan.

#28 Posted by Veektarius (4158 posts) -

Nolan for his ambition, the Coen Brothers for their dialogue, Clint Eastwood for his moral ambiguity (he's past his prime now, but no one can help going senile.

#29 Posted by Legion_ (1209 posts) -

Nolan, Tarantino and Kubrick.

#30 Posted by Counterclockwork87 (496 posts) -

Of all-time? Definitely Ingmar Bergman, without a doubt a genius of cinema. All of his stuff is gorgeous, especially when paired with Sven Nykvist behind the camera. Gorgeous in a dark, terrible way of course.

As far as current filmmakers go, definitely Paul Thomas Anderson. He's the Kubrick of our times, especially stylistically. Its funny cuz he started off very much Scorcese inspired, but he's moved in a Kubrickian direction. And he's a brilliant writer on top of being talented out of his mind as a director.

#31 Posted by Tarsier (1052 posts) -

wes anderson, nicolas winding refn, derek cianfrance, michel gondry, hayao miyazaki

#32 Posted by VirtuaGrant (52 posts) -

This is a really good question. I really like David Fincher, Scorsese and Speilberg and Abrams for the more blockbuster-y stuff. Ridley and Tony Scott have both made some amazing films, but for very different reasons. Personally I've been getting into editing and some amateur film stuff recently and find Shane Carruth's films pretty great from the perspective of making something visually and narratively interesting on a very small budget and with limited exposition.

#33 Edited by Fredchuckdave (4493 posts) -

I like various movies so "Favorite" isn't much of an answer. Who's the objective best? Kurosawa, Hitchcock, Kubrick, or Sergio Leone . Who's the best living? Nolan. Clint Eastwood and Scorcese have both made some of my all time favorite movies, but they've also made crap. Francis Ford Coppola is the basic reason why directors are rather unreliable except for Nolan so far. Ridley Scott always has the potential to make an amazing movie but he rarely succeeds fully. Frank Darabont directed one of the best movies ever and then made almost the exact same film and it's a top 50 movie so I guess if he just kept making Shawshank over and over he'd eventually have the sheer volume of work to make him join the first group. Coen brothers have some great movies and some pretentious garbage. Tarantino has a handful of great scenes and a lot of pretentious garbage.

No one else mentioned Sergio Leone? Wow. Only one mention of Hitchcock and Kurosawa. Yay internet.

#34 Posted by beepmachine (614 posts) -

@mlarrabee: Shutter Island is great! It really nailed the classic suspense style and even if you can kind of see where it's going, the journey is a fun one. Some of the flashback scenes are the most intense stuff Scorcese's done.

I'm a huge fan of Scorcese, Fincher, Nolan, and Danny Boyle, but like a lot of people here I have to go with Kubrick. The amount of high quality films he made and their cultural impact is staggering. His films just have a look and tone to them that is wholly distinct.

#35 Edited by ThePickle (4149 posts) -

The Coen Brothers, Woody Allen, PT Anderson, Martin Scorsese, Stanley Kubrick, and Akira Kurosawa.

If I had to pick a favorite of the bunch, it would be the Coens.

#36 Posted by Red (5991 posts) -

I'd probably just copy what most have said so far, but I'll throw out Brad Bird into the mix. The Iron Giant and the Incredibles are my two of my favorite movies of all time and Ratatouille and Ghost Protocol are just very very fun movies. I don't know if he'll ever rank among the medium's best directors, but he makes reliably great movies.

And while Rob Reiner hasn't really made a good movie in a while, his first few movies (This is Spinal Tap, the Princess Bride, When Harry Met Sally, A Few Good Men) are enormously influential cultural touchstones.

#37 Edited by Aetheldod (3343 posts) -

@jimmy_p: Well I do like Barry Lyndon D: I do I really do .... tum tum .. ta tum tum , tum tum ta tum tum , tum tum tum ta tumm tum tum >_<

#38 Edited by AlexW00d (6065 posts) -

@castiel said:

David Cameron (Aliens and T2)

Lol

#39 Edited by narujoe93 (2458 posts) -

@mlarrabee: that's why I love him so much, he's one of the few mainstream directors who's willing to make some noise with his work.

Alien3 just happened to be one of those royal fuck ups caused by the distributor (20th century fox).

#40 Edited by churrific (457 posts) -

Although I thought Departed was mediocore (moreso because it was a pale comparison to the trilogy of Infernal Affair movies it was based on), I quite enjoy Scorcesee. Alot of my favorites have already been mentioned, so I'll just mention more recently, off the top of my head, Ben Affleck's movies stand out pretty well in my memory (topical too).

#41 Posted by Brenderous (1079 posts) -

Probably Edgar Wright. I've enjoyed everything he's directed since Shaun of the Dead.

#43 Edited by Scampbell (448 posts) -

Paul Thomas Anderson, somehow he makes actors I couldn't care less about seem amazing, though every aspect og his movies is something special. There is plenty of others, and it would difficult to say that one is superior, but if I had to pick one it would be him.

#44 Edited by Gamer_152 (13976 posts) -

These are predictable answers, but I love the work that Tarantino, Nolan, and Kubrick have done. They've made some amazing films.

Moderator
#45 Posted by Ghostiet (5153 posts) -

@mlarrabee said:

In my opinion, Martin Scorsese is to directing what Ernest Hemingway was to writing. Direct, stable, and succinct, they both present their stories with meticulous precision, trimmed of fat and dripping with the juice of firm internals. (To be fair, I haven't seen Shutter Island, though it is on my list.)

Signed, Scorsese's my favorite too. You should watch Shutter Island, because it's great.

#46 Edited by Gamer_152 (13976 posts) -

These are predictable answers, but I love the work that Tarantino, Nolan, and Kubrick have done. They've made some amazing films.

Moderator
#47 Posted by NinjaTard (151 posts) -

It used to be Speilberg but he's gone more into the historical than the fantastical, which isn't bad but just not his FULL potential for creativity in my book.

However, Baz Luhrman has captivated me since he made "Romeo + Juliet". The way he frames the picture, the songs and sound he chooses, and the quick cut style that's like a goofy Zach Snyder in a way is just bewitching to my eyes. That guy's movies aren't always the best films but they always look amazing. The use of the kind of bleached out sandy beaches in "Romeo", the surreal guys climing the wall in "Moulin Rouge", and for the love of God the overblown parties in "The Great Gatsby" (which, FYI, is also the best movie released this year so far and likely to be the rest of the year)....you can't look away! It's just amazing!

#48 Edited by csl316 (7381 posts) -

Oh, and I forgot to mention David Lynch (on occasion). All his stuff just gets under my skin.

#49 Posted by NinjaTard (151 posts) -

It used to be Speilberg but he's gone more into the historical than the fantastical, which isn't bad but just not his FULL potential for creativity in my book.

However, Baz Luhrman has captivated me since he made "Romeo + Juliet". The way he frames the picture, the songs and sound he chooses, and the quick cut style that's like a goofy Zach Snyder in a way is just bewitching to my eyes. That guy's movies aren't always the best films but they always look amazing. The use of the kind of bleached out sandy beaches in "Romeo", the surreal guys climing the wall in "Moulin Rouge", and for the love of God the overblown parties in "The Great Gatsby" (which, FYI, is also the best movie released this year so far and likely to be the rest of the year)....you can't look away! It's just amazing!

#50 Posted by oraknabo (1426 posts) -

Herzog