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#51 Posted by Video_Game_King (36272 posts) -

@TaliciaDragonsong:

Way to destroy the joke '-_-.

#52 Posted by Daneian (1251 posts) -

@BisonHero said:

Is coding/programming creating? I did some of that in high school and briefly was going to get a degree in computer science, but realized after a year in university that I was avoiding my classes and didn't really like messing around with code as much as I thought.

Programming is absolutely a creative endeavor, though, in my limited experience with it, one that seems to have more rigidly defined rules. One of my closest friends went through the same thing. He has a mathematical mind but didn't enjoy the repetitive nature of it.

#53 Posted by Carlos1408 (1543 posts) -

@Daneian said:

@Carlos1408 said:

In a nutshell it is a journey of self-exploration and urge to contribute to society.

Several people have indicated social reasons for why they create and I am really curious about it because 'society' is such a large and broadly defined term. It means so many things to so many different people. How do you feel your music contributes to society? Which part of society do you wish to address? Are you trying to open peoples minds to different perspectives or trying to discredit a particular view? I often have social commentary in the pieces I write, something I'm sure most people have, because I can't help but think about them.

In an earlier post, I spoke about how I think that art is important for passing ideas. On these very forums, we see users who feel very strongly about specific issues and spend a lot of time discussing them. Not only are these conversations directed to a much smaller audience, but have a harder time affecting anyone because peoples guards are often up gong in. I think its so much more effective than one on one discussion because it can provide a working model for how specific points work. As an example, The Dark Knight uses Batman as a means to discuss the role of the hero by showing his strength and resolve against not only a man who wishes to destroy Gotham but the city willing to sacrifice him for their own safety. Ideas have a way of getting to people that regular discussion often cant, no matter how civil.

What I meant by "contributing to society" in my earlier post was what I said in the sentence prior to that, I didn't link them together very well: In the context of my life and interests I would like to contribute to a new sound-art movement (if a new one does emerge) via my music. Movements such as minimalism, indeterminacy, serialism, pan intervalic music, spectral music, etc. have been a few movements I've studied in the past, all of those are incredibly interesting in their own respect. Partaking or simply witnessing a new one would be incredibly rewarding. I don't know if I've put it very clearly, it's quite late and I'm exhausted, but that's basically what I meant by 'contributing to society.' That would be my contribution to that particular facet of music's culture. It is incredibly ambitious (I would say overly ambitious), however, it's good to have a longterm huge goal in life I guess. I have also oversimplified it, but I don't really feel like writing an essay on a video game forum lol. These are questions and tasks that one cannot answer/do overnight and alone. :D

#54 Posted by Sinusoidal (1824 posts) -

I've been composing, programming and very occasionally performing music for over 20 years now and I think the only reason I keep at it is for personal gratification.

I'm almost certain that if I chose to, I could promote myself and get my music out to many, many more people than I normally do, which isn't saying much since I normally only send out stuff to a select group of friends. I don't do it because deadlines and the commoditization of music would ruin the whole process for me.

I'm just as likely to make a three minute catchy tune as I am to make ten minutes of unbearable noise. It's the process of conceptualizing that makes it worthwhile for me. For example: last year I made a piece that was the first hundred digits of Pi played by a synthesized DTMF phone (think the beep beep boop boop of the phones of yesteryear.) It's shite to listen to, but was great fun to make happen.

My brain likes to shit sound.

#55 Posted by Lysergica33 (543 posts) -

@Sinusoidal said:

I've been composing, programming and very occasionally performing music for over 20 years now and I think the only reason I keep at it is for personal gratification.

I'm almost certain that if I chose to, I could promote myself and get my music out to many, many more people than I normally do, which isn't saying much since I normally only send out stuff to a select group of friends. I don't do it because deadlines and the commoditization of music would ruin the whole process for me.

I'm just as likely to make a three minute catchy tune as I am to make ten minutes of unbearable noise. It's the process of conceptualizing that makes it worthwhile for me. For example: last year I made a piece that was the first hundred digits of Pi played by a synthesized DTMF phone (think the beep beep boop boop of the phones of yesteryear.) It's shite to listen to, but was great fun to make happen.

My brain likes to shit sound.

That sounds kind of awesome in a schoenberg-ian kind of way.

#56 Posted by LAMP (162 posts) -

I'm a musician. I've released two albums and one demo this year, all written and performed entirely by myself.

To offer the counterpoint to all of the more positive and neutral examples given of the creative spark, it's just some other secretion for me. It's about as romantic as pus and coagulating blood. All of the other alternatives of getting this sort of thing out of my system are quite harmful, to myself and others. I write and record so those thoughts and feelings don't have a chance to hurt. However, by containing all of that part of me in this one activity I'm able to function in a healthy and empathetic way.

I guess the shorter answer is something like "to keep my even strain."

#57 Posted by MooseyMcMan (11421 posts) -

I hope to make a profit off it some day (hopefully sooner rather than later).

Also, I come up with so many dumb/goofy ideas just thinking around sitting, it'd be wasteful to not turn them into things that I write.

#58 Posted by BillyTheKid (486 posts) -

I want to be good at something. And I am decent at things that I create. Other than that I suck at most of the things I do...

#59 Posted by Sursh (242 posts) -

"because i'm deep and enjoy spreading my misguided creativity."

- quote of every cliche answer.

creators need observers and observers need creators. pick a side, then willfully jerk to portraits of yourself painted by the pseudo cults that worship you. no brainer. help me out here, guys.

#60 Posted by That1BlackGuy (216 posts) -

I'm" an advertiser, I like to create stuff and sell it to people and I get paid well to do it. Nothing more, nothing less.

#61 Posted by theodacourt (546 posts) -

Creating is a means to entertain and I often find myself wanting to be a comedian, a writer, a game designer and musician all at once. I'm only really a musician though and I haven't tried the others too much. I was bullied quite a lot at school and entertaining people via creation is a way to be accepted by society as a response to being rejected by it at school. It's a pretty deeply rooted motivation I guess but making other people happy is about as happy as I can get.

#62 Posted by Daneian (1251 posts) -

@Sursh said:

"because i'm deep and enjoy spreading my misguided creativity."

- quote of every cliche answer.

creators need observers and observers need creators. pick a side, then willfully jerk to portraits of yourself painted by the pseudo cults that worship you. no brainer. help me out here, guys.

Not everyone creates for recognition, some people enjoy the act of creation. There are people who tinker alone in their workshops and some who draw and never show it to anyone.

A large part of my love for storytelling comes from having an idea and trying to construct a plot, theme and characters that represent it. It's personal satisfaction.

#63 Posted by Sursh (242 posts) -

@Daneian said:

@Sursh said:

"because i'm deep and enjoy spreading my misguided creativity."

- quote of every cliche answer.

creators need observers and observers need creators. pick a side, then willfully jerk to portraits of yourself painted by the pseudo cults that worship you. no brainer. help me out here, guys.

Not everyone creates for recognition, some people enjoy the act of creation. There are people who tinker alone in their workshops and some who draw and never show it to anyone.

A large part of my love for storytelling comes from having an idea and trying to construct a plot, theme and characters that represent it. It's personal satisfaction.

i applaud that, no longer existent, genre of creators. or maybe they do exist and they just haven't begun to spread the genius cortex they contain. in truth, every answer on here (including myself) is not/no longer apart of the categorization you mentioned.