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#1 Posted by TenTonAlchemist (23 posts) -

Need a storage medium for my PC build. HDDs are the most common I think but some can get slow. SSDs can't hold as much as HDDs, so should I get a Hybrid? But a friend of mine who's built a lot of PCs before said that they would be horrible. So what do you guys think I should get?

#2 Posted by Marz (5672 posts) -

ssd for OS, regular 3TB HDD for storage

#3 Posted by mwng (956 posts) -

What's your budget and how much space do you need?

#4 Edited by alanm26v5 (463 posts) -

Current Samsung EVOs have been on sale a ton lately because of a new line of them coming out soon. I would get a 250GB SSD for your OS and current games your playing, then use Steam Mover to move the data over to a hard drive. I have a 120GB SSD right now, but with games starting to get larger, I'm starting to only be able to fit 2 or 3 at a time on them which is starting to annoy me.

#5 Posted by TenTonAlchemist (23 posts) -

@mwng Around $2800 and enough space to hold some 8th gen games for 2 to 3 years.

#6 Edited by mlarrabee (3064 posts) -

I picked up a 960 GB Crucial SSD for around $350 USD on Amazon. Keep an eye out.

I'll echo what others have said: an SSD for your OS and the games you're currently playing; one or two 3 TB HDDs to store the rest; and Steam Mover to swap the files.

#7 Posted by VierasTalo (939 posts) -

@marz said:

ssd for OS, regular 3TB HDD for storage

This. Hybrids are a bit weird a pick if you've got the room/power/budget to accommodate them separately.

Online
#8 Posted by kylenalepa (138 posts) -

@marz said:

ssd for OS, regular 3TB HDD for storage

Yep. Samsung 850 Pro for the SSD is what I'd recommend. Also, no criticism if that's what you want to spend, but $2800 seems like major overkill. You can build a kickass gaming PC for half that.

#9 Edited by MB (13139 posts) -

@kylenalepa said:

@marz said:

ssd for OS, regular 3TB HDD for storage

Yep. Samsung 850 Pro for the SSD is what I'd recommend. Also, no criticism if that's what you want to spend, but $2800 seems like major overkill. You can build a kickass gaming PC for half that.

Seriously...with a budget like that I could probably build a machine that is in the top 0.5% of all gaming PC's. Maybe top .25%. Just for fun I'm going to take that budget and put something quick together, though. I'll paste it into the thread, will include monitor, kb&m, and either headphones or speakers.

And here it is: Probably could use with some tweaking, but I spent less than five minutes on this so, take it for what you will:

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/87npzy

  • Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/87npzy/by_merchant/
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ NCIX US)
  • CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
  • Motherboard: Asus MAXIMUS VII HERO ATX LGA1150 Z97 Motherboard ($209.98 @ SuperBiiz)
  • Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($82.98 @ OutletPC)
  • Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($82.98 @ OutletPC)
  • Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($189.98 @ OutletPC) (Wait for 850 Pro Next week)
  • Storage: Western Digital BLACK SERIES 4TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($229.99 @ Amazon)
  • Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB DirectCU II Video Card ($669.99 @ NCIX US)
  • Case: Phanteks Enthoo Pro ATX Full Tower Case ($99.99 @ Amazon)
  • Power Supply: Corsair Professional 750W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($149.98 @ OutletPC)
  • Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 Pro (OEM) (64-bit) ($129.98 @ OutletPC)
  • Monitor: QNIX Perfect Pixel QX2710 Matte 60Hz 27.0" 1440p 144hz Monitor ($369.99 @ Newegg)
  • Keyboard: Corsair Vengeance K70 Wired Mechanical Gaming Keyboard ($109.99 @ Amazon)
  • Mouse: Logitech G500 Wired Laser Mouse ($72.78 @ SuperBiiz)
  • Headphones: Logitech G35 7.1 Channel Surround Headset ($89.99 @ Amazon)
  • Speakers: Logitech Z313 25W 2.1ch Speakers ($39.38 @ Amazon)
  • Total: $2817.96
  • Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Moderator
#10 Posted by MonkeyKing1969 (3046 posts) -

Need a storage medium for my PC build. HDDs are the most common I think but some can get slow. SSDs can't hold as much as HDDs, so should I get a Hybrid? But a friend of mine who's built a lot of PCs before said that they would be horrible. So what do you guys think I should get?

Your friend is being hyperbolic...and in my opinion is outdated in his thinking. But, here is the deal - You don't need a big SSD, you just need one 'big enough' for your OS (about 32 GB) and enough for important programs you want to load fast (so maybe a 120GB total). Then you just use a HDD for storage, and the price of a small SSD and good sized HHD is not really that much money. You can buy a small SSD for $60 to $120 depending on size.

If you cannot or don't want to pay for two drives and you want simple; than, YES, a hybrid drive is for you. A typical SSHD is 80 percent faster in performance than traditional 7200-RPM drive, so it not really a HORRIBLE choice. I myself use a small SSD and leave storage on a few HHDs, but that is just me...I also do weird RAM discs too...so I'm more in the hobbyist camp.

If I were building a computer, maybe my first computer, I might just go with a SSHD because you need only install one drive. That means less wires, less checking connections, less space used in a case.... and a really straight forward installation process for all software. And, as I said a SSHD is plenty fast for a reasonable price! An SSHD isn't really something to SAVE MONEY, because you can buy a small SSD and a big HDD for nearly the same price....the selling point is just installing one very quick drive that does all storage.

The only downside to having one drive is if that one drive shits the bed, right? And, in my whole life I have only had ONE drive fail on me in an irrecoverable way. Complete drive failure is rare, and it not a huge deal if you have a recovery disc.

#11 Edited by Ben_H (3441 posts) -

I'll echo what everyone else has said. Don't get a hybrid, just get a small-medium sized SSD and a large HDD and you will be set. If your HDD is fast enough, load speeds for games will be negligible to the point where moving them over to an SSD to play will be kinda pointless. As such, just get an SSD for OS and main programs and store everything else on large 7200RPM HDDs.

For example, my setup on both my desktops (I have a Windows game-focused desktop and a Linux work-focused desktop) is a main SSD that is 120GB, and then a 2TB HDD for everything else. In fact, I even use this setup on my laptop because I ripped out the optical drive and replaced it with a 2.5" HDD. My main drive in that machine is an SSD and I have a spinny drive for storage. It works great in all cases.

#12 Posted by TenTonAlchemist (23 posts) -

@mb Thanks a lot for that list! I hadn't really decided on all the parts yet. I'm planning to assemble my build in December.

@kylenalepa I didn't have much of an idea of how much my budget should be. I saw a couple of builds and they were around the $3000 mark so I went with $2800. I was originally going to go with $1800.

So, what kind of stuff could I get with $1800.

#13 Edited by EXTomar (4951 posts) -

I don't favor hybrid drives since they seem to have all of the disadvantages of both a SSD and HDD without a cost benefit. Go with a SSD and separate HDD.

#14 Posted by ajamafalous (12164 posts) -

@mb Thanks a lot for that list! I hadn't really decided on all the parts yet. I'm planning to assemble my build in December.

@kylenalepa I didn't have much of an idea of how much my budget should be. I saw a couple of builds and they were around the $3000 mark so I went with $2800. I was originally going to go with $1800.

So, what kind of stuff could I get with $1800.

1800 is still more than enough to be completely top-end. I built mine in 09 with 1250 and it was the best everything you could get at the time minus the GPU.

#15 Edited by Xanadu (426 posts) -

I also use an SSD for my OS and regular HDD for storage. As others have said Hybrids are not the best option. My SSD has about 85GB so I have enough room to throw one or two games on that drive if I feel like it and the rest are on my HDD.

#16 Posted by pcorb (150 posts) -

@mb Thanks a lot for that list! I hadn't really decided on all the parts yet. I'm planning to assemble my build in December.

@kylenalepa I didn't have much of an idea of how much my budget should be. I saw a couple of builds and they were around the $3000 mark so I went with $2800. I was originally going to go with $1800.

So, what kind of stuff could I get with $1800.

Do you already have a monitor/speakers/headphones or are you starting totally from scratch?

Also, another vote for an SSD and HD solution, hybrid drives don't really make a lot of sense any more.

#17 Posted by onarum (2302 posts) -

SSDs are completely overrated in my opinion... also what is the benefit of having a SSD for the OS only? so it will load faster? what for?

The only benefit is for gaming, and to do some serious gaming you'll need a lot of space, which costs too much for an SSD.

I say get 2 nice single platter HDDs, 500GB each, make a raid 0 array with them, done; Cheap, lots of space (for OS and games) and great performance, then get a 2-3 TB "green" drive just for storage, movies and stuff.

#18 Posted by flasaltine (1711 posts) -

@onarum said:

SSDs are completely overrated in my opinion... also what is the benefit of having a SSD for the OS only? so it will load faster? what for?

The only benefit is for gaming, and to do some serious gaming you'll need a lot of space, which costs too much for an SSD.

I say get 2 nice single platter HDDs, 500GB each, make a raid 0 array with them, done; Cheap, lots of space (for OS and games) and great performance, then get a 2-3 TB "green" drive just for storage, movies and stuff.

Sounds like you never used an SSD.

#19 Edited by onarum (2302 posts) -

@flacracker: I did, and it loaded windows very fast alright, other than that no benefit at all.

Like I said, it has obvious benefits for gaming, but in order to have enough space to game you need to spend too much on a SSD, like for the price of a 128 GB SSD you can easily get a high performance 500GB or more HDD, put two of em in raid 0 and it's a far better bang for your buck imo

edit: of course, it depends on your habits, if you're perfectly fine on having only a few games installed at a time should be fine, for me it would just not work, I have 200 games installed right now... goddamn steam...

#20 Edited by MB (13139 posts) -

@onarum: Something must have been wrong with your hardware configuration...because man, after my first SSD there is no way I could ever go back to a system without one. Boot faster, copy & move files faster, games load lightning fast, completely silent operation with no moving parts. I'm not sure I have ever even encountered someone who has used SSD's in a gaming PC who would not recommend that route to others. They're that good.

I also have several terabytes of games installed, but usually only am actively playing four or five at a time at the most anyway. It's a simple matter to use SteamTool to move games back and forth off of the SSD to manage space, it takes literally seconds and only needs to be done once every few weeks or so. Not an issue at all, at least for me.

Moderator
#21 Posted by EXTomar (4951 posts) -

I completely agree. The first time I used an SSD was actually on a Linux work station that would boot within moments of leaving BIOS. From then on, I've built my PCs with one SSD drive and one HDD where the only bummer with Windows is that it doesn't really have a clean way make drives seamless (make everything appear like it is on one C: even though parts of it are on multiple drives) or have it seamless remount the boot drive to something else (make the drive with windows on it, something like W:\ while everything big HDD is C:\) without a lot of working at it.

#22 Posted by Lydian_Sel (2501 posts) -

The platform of SSD for your OS and core files and then large HDD for everything else is pretty solid. The only thing I will say is don't cheap out on the SSD, they're not incredibly stable or reliable to begin.

#23 Edited by onarum (2302 posts) -

@mb: I admit I never used an SSD for gaming though, of course logically I know it will load them, stream resources etc ridiculously fast, but the price always put me off, considering I always liked having tons of games installed.

I was not aware of this steamtool though, seems handy as hell, and makes having a 128 - 256 GB SSD for OS/games feasible

My main point was that having a small SSD, like 64 GB or so, JUST for the OS would be completely pointless, yes it will boot lighting fast but you'll still be constrained by the HDD speeds when running games, copying files etc

Anyway I still like my raid 0 setup, takes about 8-10 seconds from switch on to login screen and games load pretty fast, as fast as a SSD? of course not, but my 1 TB raid 0 cost me like 1/5 of what would have spent on a SSD with half that storage capacity.

#24 Posted by pcorb (150 posts) -

@onarum: Yeah, that's why hybrid drives or an SSD cache were decent solutions in the past. The premium of an SSD big enough to hold an operating system and core programs was just too much. That really hasn't been the case for a while now, and there are decent 500gb SSDs available for $200.

Honestly the convenience of barely existent boot and load times has made it a chore for me to use a machine with an HDD. Those seconds really add up.

#25 Posted by MB (13139 posts) -

@pcorb: Yeah but with HDD's you don't have the inconvenience of games loading too fast to be able to read the loading screen tips & lore!

Moderator
#26 Edited by Rorie (2987 posts) -

The first time I booted from an SSD was an almost religious experience. I consider them to be pretty much mandatory for your boot drive at this point, and having a sizable SSD for games is likewise a really good idea. Prices are getting to the point where .33 or .50 cents per gig is not uncommon. A solid 256gig SSD will make you very happy.

Note that the brand of the SSD, while not as important as it was a few years ago when Intel was clearly the best choice for picking up an SSD that wouldn't destroy all your data, should still be considered. You don't want to buy a crap SSD just because it's cheap. I know Intel drives are still highly-regarded for their stability; I have one of those, as well as a newer Samsung, and I have no complaints. Do some research on the brand before you get one.

Staff
#27 Edited by Ezekiel (551 posts) -

@marz said:

ssd for OS, regular 3TB HDD for storage

This is what I have and would recommend. But I also have another 1 TB installed, which I use for backups. I'll probably back all the data from the 3 TB drive up to an external eventually, so that I can use the 1 TB again.

#28 Posted by onarum (2302 posts) -

@pcorb: unfortunately in Brazil they are still at a ridiculous premium, a good brand 500 GB SSD costs the equivalent to US$1000,00 , I shit you not.

But yeah I totally agree, if they are that accessible over there now I see no reason why not to get a SSD

#29 Posted by MormonWarrior (2668 posts) -

I got a 128 GB SSD for my operating system and program files and a 2TB HDD for all my games, pictures, videos, etc. It's treated me well so far and it was like $160 total for both.

#30 Edited by AndrewB (7691 posts) -

My attitude is still to get a modest sized SSD (as much as you can fit into your budget/the best $-per-gig ratio and preferably pick it up when it's on sale) and one or more ridiculous capacity HDDs for storing stuff (unless you don't store a lot of data locally). Then for installing games I go with what makes the most sense - older games that aren't resource-intensive can stay on the platters, while newer and more demanding games go to the SSD. If it fills up, I can always swap out what is installed where (even easier with Steam) based on what I'm actually playing.

For reference, the bulk of my storage is split between a 64GB SSD (an older Crucial M4) for the OS, a 256GB Seagate SSD, and a 3 and 4 TB HDD.

As for hybrid discs, I've never been one to trust software to decide what to place in the speedy cache in an efficient or accurate manner, and with the average price differential I'd rather save the extra cash on something else.

#31 Posted by TenTonAlchemist (23 posts) -

@pcorb Yes I'm starting from scratch. No moniter, headset, keyboard. NOTHING. But I can extend the budget for my peripherals. $1800 is just for the parts, I guess.

#32 Posted by pcorb (150 posts) -

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/9k3RYJ

Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/9k3RYJ/by_merchant/

  • CPU: Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ NCIX US)
  • CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
  • Motherboard: Asus Z97-A ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($143.99 @ Amazon)
  • Memory: Corsair 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($74.99 @ NCIX US)
  • Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ Amazon)
  • Storage: Western Digital Red 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($98.94 @ OutletPC)
  • Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Superclocked ACX Video Card ($320.91 @ Newegg)
  • Case: Corsair 450D ATX Mid Tower Case ($119.99 @ Amazon)
  • Power Supply: XFX 550W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ NCIX US)
  • Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($15.98 @ OutletPC)
  • Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($95.99 @ Best Buy)
  • Monitor: Dell U2412M 60Hz 24.0" Monitor ($265.00 @ Amazon)
  • Keyboard: Logitech Wireless Combo MK270 Wireless Standard Keyboard w/Optical Mouse ($17.95 @ Amazon)
  • Headphones: Sennheiser HD 518 Headphones ($78.00 @ Amazon)
  • Speakers: Creative Labs GigaWorks T20 Series II 28W 2ch Speakers ($79.99 @ Micro Center)
  • Total: $1781.69
  • Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

That's a build for overclocking. You could save a bit upfront if you don't ever want to OC, but in the long run it's a decent boost to your processing power for very little cost.

You should also pick up a 360 controller if you don't have any lying about. It's pretty much a necessity these days.

#33 Edited by onarum (2302 posts) -

I would recommend getting at least a 650W PSU though, 550W seems like the bare minimum for that system.

#34 Edited by EquitasInvictus (2030 posts) -

Yeah, I second giving yourself some room in terms of your PSU. A PSU unable to keep up with everything you've got on board and everything you'll end up connecting might cause some unforeseen performance issues and even kernel panics related to power.

SSDs do use significantly less power than HDDs, however, so that's definitely a consideration in addition to the other recommendations already brought up.

#35 Posted by pcorb (150 posts) -

As long as you go with a decent brand, you don't need to worry so much about wattage. The recommended wattage given by videocard manufacturers is generally significantly more than required to account for the fact that a lot of PSUs out there are garbage which can scarcely provide half their claimed power without blowing.

This is a pretty useful tool for working out what you should be aiming for.

#36 Posted by Andorski (5367 posts) -

@pcorb said:

As long as you go with a decent brand, you don't need to worry so much about wattage. The recommended wattage given by videocard manufacturers is generally significantly more than required to account for the fact that a lot of PSUs out there are garbage which can scarcely provide half their claimed power without blowing.

This is a pretty useful tool for working out what you should be aiming for.

Can confirm. I have a i7/GTX 780 being powered by a gold rated 450W SFX PSU. So long as the PSU can reliable output the power at peak wattage, going under 600W (the recommended amount of wattage by GPU manufacturers) is fine for single GPU builds.

#37 Posted by Andorski (5367 posts) -

Here is a ~$1800 build to recommend. I went a little over the price limit, but I think the parts I picked are worth it:

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/TwMFbv
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/TwMFbv/by_merchant/

CPU: Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ NCIX US)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Asus Z97M-PLUS Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($126.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($77.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($82.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 770 2GB TWIN FROZR Video Card ($309.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Fractal Design Arc Mini R2 MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($64.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Monitor: Dell P2414H 60Hz 23.8" Monitor ($209.99 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: Cooler Master Storm QuickFire Rapid Wired Gaming Keyboard ($86.00 @ Mechanical Keyboards)
Mouse: Logitech G502 Wired Optical Mouse ($74.99 @ Amazon)
Headphones: Logitech G930 7.1 Channel Headset ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Other: Klipsch - ProMedia 2.1 Speaker System (3-Piece) - Black ($139.99)

Total: $1860.85

Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

#38 Posted by TenTonAlchemist (23 posts) -

@pcorb I really don't plan to OC. And I'd rather go for a "simple high end" build, like with air cooling and standard CPU and GPU models. I was thinking of using a GTX 780ti and an intel i7. Any comments or advice on the route I'm going?

#39 Edited by pcorb (150 posts) -

@tentonalchemist: There's really very little to recommend an i7 over an i5 if the most CPU intensive thing you'll be doing is gaming. The increase in performance in games is negligible, and the $100 or so price difference is better spent pretty much anywhere else.

Do you know what resolution you're intending to use? If you're not going above 1080p, a 780ti is overkill.

#40 Posted by Andorski (5367 posts) -
@pcorb said:

@tentonalchemist:

Do you know what resolution you're intending to use? If you're not going above 1080p, a 780ti is overkill.

I wouldn't say that. I still need to turn down a few graphical options in order to hit 1080p 60fps in some games. This is particularly true if the game supports TXAA and PhysX.

#41 Posted by realkman (70 posts) -

@flacracker: No kidding. Installing that felt like I hit a magic switch and I'm still amazed by it every day one year later.

#42 Posted by realkman (70 posts) -

@pcorb said:

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/9k3RYJ

Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/9k3RYJ/by_merchant/

  • Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($129.99 @ Amazon)
  • Storage: Western Digital Red 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($98.94 @ OutletPC)
  • Power Supply: XFX 550W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ NCIX US)
  • Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($15.98 @ OutletPC)

That's a build for overclocking. You could save a bit upfront if you don't ever want to OC, but in the long run it's a decent boost to your processing power for very little cost.

You should also pick up a 360 controller if you don't have any lying about. It's pretty much a necessity these days.

Hi, a few comments. Keeping in mind he has a lot to spend, let me say this:

Great price on SSD, but terrible HDD performance.

Underpowered and "cheap" PSU for the build, Corsair TX650 or better.

Could go for BD instead of DVD for greater resolution in movies, of course.

Any reason for Win8 over Win7?

Not bad overall.

#43 Edited by SoldierG654342 (1822 posts) -

I have a 4TB Seagate Hybrid and the improvement from a standard HDD is noticeable, especially on boot. Sure, it's not as snappy as a pure SSD, but it's faster than an HDD and I have tons of storage space.

#44 Posted by TenTonAlchemist (23 posts) -

@pcorb Do I need a 780ti to run games on 1080p,60+ fps and all graphical options on full AND last for 3-4 years or can I do the same thing with something less high end?

#45 Posted by jaycrockett (492 posts) -

I just got a new PC last month, to use like a console in the living room. I went with a 256 SSD and a 1 TB HD. The thing boots into Steam Big Picture faster than my 360 boots up. I'm pretty happy.

#46 Posted by Bollard (5868 posts) -

Can I just get clarification - why is everyone suggesting the Samsung 840 Pro? The 840 EVO is significantly cheaper and as fast (more or less)?

#47 Posted by Nightriff (5365 posts) -

SSD for OS and important applications/files

HDD for storage and where speed isn't necessary.

#48 Posted by pcorb (150 posts) -

@realkman: The newer WD reds are great for reliability and are basically totally silent (the latter might not be an important factor for most people, I just happen to like a build to be as quiet as possible). I don't consider maximising performance a priority, seeing as anything that benefits from high performance should be on the SSD. It's probably wiser to keep Windows 7 if you have a spare key you can transfer, but if you're going fresh, there's not much point in buying a 5 year old OS when a more recent and (ignoring metro) overall better version is available for not that much extra cost.

See my above response about the PSU.

@tentonalchemist: Even with a 780ti, maxing out everything for 4 years isn't terribly realistic. If you have a big old pile of money to burn, sure go for it, but buying video cards at the very, very high end is pretty much always awful value for money. You're paying around twice the price of a 770 for nowhere near twice the power. If you are going to get that tier of card, you should probably get a 290x anyway, from what I've heard they're slightly better and cheaper, although they run hotter. You might be able to get a bargain on a barely used 2nd hand one off ebay, if failed cryptocurrency magnates are still jumping that ship.

A more sensible route would probably be to buy a more modestly priced high end card today, and then do the same again in a couple of years when you start having to turn down settings to get 60fps.

#49 Posted by EXTomar (4951 posts) -

I wouldn't say that, I bought a NVidia 580 back when that thing was blazing fast, bleeding edge new, and stupidly expensive and it is still good today. I got my entire worth out of it and then some.

Buying an expensive hardware makes sense if you plan to use it for a long time which is why I usually recommend spending up on those parts. That doesn't you should do it all of the time because there are clearly risks but it isn't foolish either. The important thing is to stick in your budget.

#50 Posted by TenTonAlchemist (23 posts) -

@pcorb Ok...so what about a 780? And what motherboard do you think I should get? Something relatively fast, not that expensive and durable.