#1 Posted by OldManLight (851 posts) -

Was wondering if my current PSU is enough amperage and wattage to support my current setup. Help?

I ask because when i check my power settings in my bios and the 12v rail appears to be consistently around 11.5. Didn't know if that was a telltale sign of that being overloaded or not.

Phenom II x4 965 black at 3.7GHZ stock cooler

12 GB DDR3

2 HD 7770's Crossfire

5 SATA Hard Drives,

HT Omega Claro 2 PCI Sound Card

4 case fans (1 of which is an LED)

#2 Edited by Green_Incarnate (1788 posts) -
#3 Posted by JJWeatherman (14558 posts) -

I'd say you're probably pushing it with that PSU.

According to this guide, that power supply is a tier 4 (1 being the best, 5 being the worst), and only outputs about 75% of the advertised wattage. Running that CPU, two GPUs and five hard drives on that thing seems risky.

Maybe try taking one of your GPUs out and check the voltages in your bios again just to see if it changes significantly.

I just looked at my own bios and my 12v rail is sitting at about 12.1-ish, so yeah, 11.5 may be a problem, but I'm no expert.

#4 Posted by VACkillers (1063 posts) -

when going with a dual GPU setup, I would always reccomend going with at least 750WATT... gives you headroom and is more then enough for most dual GPU setups unless you are using high end stuff.... with 5 haddrives as well, 600 would be pushing that to its limits....if not beyond it.. PSU will be sucking more power out then normal if you are using all your memory slots for your 12GB RAM as well...

#5 Edited by Devildoll (882 posts) -

@oldmanlight: you've got full specs on the page you linked yourself

it has two 12 volt rails with 18 amps each, ( 12 x 18 x 2 = 432 watt ) so its pretty crappy, it is probably capable of delivering 600 watts continuously, when you take the 5 and 3.3 volt rails into account, but that is bullshit, no thirsty components use those rails, everything demanding ( cpu gpu etc ) runs on 12 volt.

however, 7770's are pretty cute, they only have a TDP of 80 watts, when techpowerup tested two of em together, they didn't use more than 159 all in all.The cpu you have is rated at 125 watts, and what does a harddrive need? lets say 10 watts each?

your computer will use under 350 watts when it is pushed to it's absolute limits, so you should be alright even with this badly marketed psu.That is unless you start overclocking and tampering with voltages, that will make your usage increase substantially.

#6 Edited by TyCobb (1972 posts) -

http://images10.newegg.com/BizIntell/tool/psucalc/index.html

Well, dumping your info into newegg's little calculator you are right on the border. Of course your exact set up won't be there, but I would look into a 750W. It's amazing how new PC components use so little energy nowadays. I remember requiring a 450W in my old gaming rig in 2004 and that of course was nowhere near what we are running today.

EDIT: D'OH, just realized this was linked already. Oh well.

#7 Edited by Stonyman65 (2713 posts) -

DO NOT GET A CHEAP PSU.

Seriously. That is probably the most critical part of the build. Without a solid, efficient power supply your system will not be stable, and will cause lots of problems down the road, especially with high end hardware.

Go with something for Cooler Master, Corsair, Seasonic, ThermalTake.... Something that is at least 80 Plus Bronze certified. As for power, I would say go with a minimum of 600w, with the ideal being around 750w or more for some extra headroom if you need it for more hardware, or more powerful hardware down the line. Remember that as temperature increases, the PSU will have to work harder to pump out the required power and still be stable. In that case, having a little extra headroom to compensate for that is a really good thing (especially if you are overclocking too)

Something like this would be ideal, or maybe go up to a 80 Plus Silver certified PSU, and some more wattage. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139006

Don't skimp on the PSU. Get something good that will last a long time and be stable.

#8 Edited by Devildoll (882 posts) -

((

@tycobb said:

http://images10.newegg.com/BizIntell/tool/psucalc/index.html

Well, dumping your info into newegg's little calculator you are right on the border. Of course your exact set up won't be there, but I would look into a 750W. It's amazing how new PC components use so little energy nowadays. I remember requiring a 450W in my old gaming rig in 2004 and that of course was nowhere near what we are running today.

EDIT: D'OH, just realized this was linked already. Oh well.

that newegg thing is exaggerating like hell, just so newbies dont fry their shit,

( i guess they mean reccomended as in "get a psu with this much power" and not "your computer will draw this much power", they really shouldn't be using exact watts in that case, cause there isn't a psu in the world that is rated for 457 watts or 511,75 watts. they should be displaying values like 400 550 etc, at least imo. )

And as i said earlier, he actually has 432 watts where it matters, so if that newegg thing was correct, his computer would be a smouldering heap of metal by now.

@stonyman65 said:
Remember that as temperature increases, the PSU will have to work harder to pump out the required power and still be stable. In that case, having a little extra headroom to compensate for that is a really good thing (especially if you are overclocking too)

what that means is that as it gets hotter, your psu will suck more power from the wall socket, in order to feed the computer a certain amount, the power it produces stays the same however, unless we are talking failing temperature.

In which case a more powerful power-supply wouldn't help, apart from the fact that it is hopefully built from higher grade components that can operate under a tad more heated conditions, but that's about quality, not necessarily power.