#1 Edited by GoranP (1115 posts) -

I tried and Fraps and Camtasia. Both work as advertised but no matter what settings I put, the files come out huge! I have a 1TB hdd that isn't empty and I was thinking about recording longer gameplay videos (40+ minutes). A long match of Battlefield 3 would basically take up most of my space. What program do you recommend or use? Thanks!

#2 Posted by roninenix (119 posts) -

Bandicam to record, then find a good program to compress.

#3 Posted by JJOR64 (18908 posts) -

I guess I could use XSplit for it. Haven't really tired video recording with it, but streaming works great with it.

#4 Posted by CornBREDX (4806 posts) -

You need to compress it. As far as I know this will be true no matter what software you use.

#5 Posted by GoranP (1115 posts) -

Is there anything that can compress as it records? Sorry if that's a dumb question, I'm new to all of this.

#6 Posted by Video_Game_King (36012 posts) -

Hypercam 2 is great for recording, but I'd follow everybody else's advice about compression or whatever. The only thing I know about compression is compressing and making the video quality a little worse as you do it. I imagine everybody else means something different.

#8 Edited by Devildoll (877 posts) -

guess im a dinosaur, cause im still using fraps.

Dxtory is an alternative i've heard, i believe it can compress as it records.

#9 Posted by Corvak (901 posts) -

I use OBS for streaming. It's got a lot of Xsplit's functions, but it's free. It can output to file as well. Though I know very little about compression, and if I were recording with it, i'd probably be here asking :)

#10 Edited by Bollard (5254 posts) -

@goranp: The reason the files are huge is because the software explicitly doesn't compress as it records. That's for two reasons, one, if it did your framerate would take an even bigger hit, and it's not like FRAPS and its ilk don't already knock off a fair few frames. Two, if it compressed as it recorded you would lose quality. It's far more beneficial to have super high quality raw video that you can compress as required after, but if it was reducing the quality as you recorded you would have no way of reversing that.

Your best option is buy another hard drive. A 1TB hard drive is like the same price as FRAPS, so you have no excuse not to get one. Plus, I've heard you actually get improved performance if you record to a different drive from the one you are playing off of.

#11 Edited by KickahaOta (142 posts) -

Your best option is buy another hard drive. A 1TB hard drive is like the same price as FRAPS, so you have no excuse not to get one. Plus, I've heard you actually get improved performance if you record to a different drive from the one you are playing off of.

This is true. With modern hard drives and controller cards, it doesn't have as much of an effect as it used to; but on most hardware you'll get significantly better results -- both a better recording, and (potentially) smoother gameplay -- if you have a separate hard drive dedicated to recording. Most modern games read data from the disk (textures, etc.) as you play. If the game and the recording are on the same drive, then the drive's read/write head has to go back and forth between "move to the game files and read the data the game needs" and "move to the free space and write the recording"; that can introduce random delays into both the game and the recording. If the recording is on a separate drive of its own, then the game's hard drive can act just like it would if there was no recording, and the recording hard drive can continuously write the recording data.

In fact, there are a few folks who will tell you that you should spend the extra $30 and get a separate SATA controller card just to hook the recording hard drive to; but with modern onboard SATA controllers (at least on medium-to-high-end motherboards), I think that's going too far at this point.

#12 Edited by RandomHero666 (3181 posts) -

If you want it for recording games. Here's what I use:

Dxtory

Video codec:

Lagarith lossless

I have a 40 minute recording of Planetside 2, recorded in 720p, only 30GB

I have a 1 minute recording using the default Dxtory codec, 720p, 6GB

There's literally no difference in quality, only difference is file size

#13 Edited by funkgretzky (35 posts) -

Try MSI Afterburner, most of my friends recommend it. Never use camtasia, it's not intended for recording gameplay

#15 Posted by armedpatriots (22 posts) -

My favorite is Camtasia hands down.

#16 Edited by MordeaniisChaos (5730 posts) -

@chavtheworld said:
Your best option is buy another hard drive. A 1TB hard drive is like the same price as FRAPS, so you have no excuse not to get one. Plus, I've heard you actually get improved performance if you record to a different drive from the one you are playing off of.

This is true. With modern hard drives and controller cards, it doesn't have as much of an effect as it used to; but on most hardware you'll get significantly better results -- both a better recording, and (potentially) smoother gameplay -- if you have a separate hard drive dedicated to recording. Most modern games read data from the disk (textures, etc.) as you play. If the game and the recording are on the same drive, then the drive's read/write head has to go back and forth between "move to the game files and read the data the game needs" and "move to the free space and write the recording"; that can introduce random delays into both the game and the recording. If the recording is on a separate drive of its own, then the game's hard drive can act just like it would if there was no recording, and the recording hard drive can continuously write the recording data.

In fact, there are a few folks who will tell you that you should spend the extra $30 and get a separate SATA controller card just to hook the recording hard drive to; but with modern onboard SATA controllers (at least on medium-to-high-end motherboards), I think that's going too far at this point.

I actually wouldn't suggest going for just another 1TB hard drive. Ultimately, the biggest bottleneck for your hard drive performance isn't if it's in use (few games really use much read/write speed, except when loading occurs and usually you don't need great recording during that) but the overall performance of your hard drive. It'd be better to invest in a fast hard drive (there are levels of price and speed you can go for. My Velociraptor, 1TB, gets SIGNIFICANTLY better write speeds than my WD Black. Dxtory's little benchmark gave me results of 78 MB/s for my WD Black, and 128 MB/s for my Velociraptor. If you really want to record and you're getting a dedicated drive for it, you should buy an SSD with at least 250 GB, record to that, then compress it from there to a storage drive. It's more expensive, but makes a HUGE difference on performance. But something like a velociraptor will give a good bit of performance boost for a lot less than an SSD, and you can get a bigger drive (I have a 1TB, and 600GB would be fine for just recording).

If you have to be cheap, get a 2TB Seagate Barracuda, it's the best 7200RPM drive for recording.

#17 Posted by DrIntrovert (81 posts) -

Regardless of what recording software you use, you're going to need to compress the video afterward if you want it to be a reasonable size. Pretty much any video editing software will work, I use ffmpeg (simplicity for a simple task like this). Just make sure you don't compress out the quality too much. I wouldn't recommend compressing the video as you record, because you are going to want the highest possible quality for the initial video.

#18 Edited by kn00tcn (158 posts) -

lolwut, why would you need an SSD for recording regular resolutions at a fixed bitrate, things like the fraps codec arent that bandwidth intensive

as for mechanical speeds, the platter density determines a lot

http://www.legitreviews.com/article/2182/3/ for example, both of these are 4TB, the seagate is 5900rpm while the wd is 7200rpm, yet the seagate is faster since it has more dense platters (1tb vs 800gb)

rpm does help a lot with random access, so if your files are fragmented or the game is loading a million little files, it will appear to load faster in the above wd example

anyway i have first hand experience with awful recording speed when the game files are on the same physical drive in GTA4 since it's loading large neighborhoods when you're driving (or worse in BF3 beta... i've had the game files+recording+pagefile all on the same drive while running out of ram, the framerate chugged down to horrible 5fps stuttering)

EDIT: there's nothing wrong with compressing as you're recording, just keep the bitrate high so the quality is 'good enough', something like 15 mbit, of course do note that it will take up some cpu power

my workflow is simple: fraps -> ripbot264 at 8mbit 2pass (x264 profile high 4.0 progressive) for my personal archive quality (screenshots are fraps png -> 97% no subsampling jpeg from irfanview batch)

#19 Posted by Skytylz (4029 posts) -

@corvak said:

I use OBS for streaming. It's got a lot of Xsplit's functions, but it's free. It can output to file as well. Though I know very little about compression, and if I were recording with it, i'd probably be here asking :)

Use this, you can stream with open broadcasting software as well. It's totally free and you can record at ridiculously high quality if your heart desires.