Possibly the start of a new trend for games?

#1 Edited by Vigorousjammer (2472 posts) -

Just watched a gameplay demo for this game... and it looks really good, but it also got me thinking. What if this kind of gameplay carries over into other games? Well, if it does, I'll be very happy. This kind of exploration of the game world is something I love about the Elder Scrolls games, and it looks a though this game tries to go even more deeply into that stuff.

I really hope this does well and prompts other game developers to try and add something similar in their games, as I think more and more games would really benefit from this kind of thing.

#2 Posted by EVO (3847 posts) -

Looks interesting, but it highlights an issue I have with many first person games: the seemingly telekinetic ability to open cupboards and whatnot.

For a game focused on interacting with the environment, the complete absence of animating said interaction breaks whatever immersion the developer was hoping for.

#3 Posted by mbr2 (558 posts) -

@evo said:

Looks interesting, but it highlights an issue I have with many first person games: the seemingly telekinetic ability to open cupboards and whatnot.

For a game focused on interacting with the environment, the complete absence of animating said interaction breaks whatever immersion the developer was hoping for.

That is really fucking hard to make it look good and I think requires the developer to model a 3rd person body so it only introduces more immersion breaking elements than ghost hands.

#4 Posted by Brodehouse (9515 posts) -

I prefer playing things that are more than just lightly interactive. If all you're bringing is environment and logs to find, then you better make sure you're telling a great story, and not another story about how life is sad because some girl died.

#5 Posted by TheManWithNoPlan (5120 posts) -

I would love to see more games incorporate a broad interaction within their environments. The important part falls directly on whether that interaction is compelling or not.

#6 Posted by BisonHero (6045 posts) -

Gone Home might be good, but it's a lot of man hours to populate an area with that many small, detailed objects. It works for that game because the whole game literally hinges on rifling through this house to figure out what's up, but in another game, it would be a lot of man hours spent on something that isn't super relevant to gameplay or anything.

#7 Edited by development (1993 posts) -

@mbr2 said:

@evo said:

Looks interesting, but it highlights an issue I have with many first person games: the seemingly telekinetic ability to open cupboards and whatnot.

For a game focused on interacting with the environment, the complete absence of animating said interaction breaks whatever immersion the developer was hoping for.

That is really fucking hard to make it look good and I think requires the developer to model a 3rd person body so it only introduces more immersion breaking elements than ghost hands.

This is exactly the problem. If you decide you're going to have functioning mirrors, visible and functional hands, and legs, then you're dedicating a lot of time to the mechanics of each individual thing.

For mirrors, you're modeling an actor and animating them in a game that otherwise has zero modeled actors. This means there probably aren't any modelers or animators on the team and they'd have to hire at least one new person and spend numerous hours just to get a couple mirrors in the game. And it has to be really good; you don't want your character walking like they're in Oblivion, or else you immediately cause a devastating hit to the atmosphere.

For hands, you model the ...hands, and arms, and in this game you'd need to make it so the fingers adjusted their grip to fit around each and every item, or make individual "hands" with a grip for every item-type.

For legs, if you don't implement some damn-good inverse kinematics you again risk harming the immersion.

All these things take an incredible amount of time (and, therefore, money), and each one adds more and more strain on the cpu. You can easily imagine why a small 4-man team would look at these issues and decide they're not within reason. These are things you could sometimes expect in a second installment, when a company's established themselves and earned some extra time and money, but not from a small studio. Though, I sure hope they don't make a "sequel." This game deserves to be left alone.

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