So... is "yee-yee-ass haircut" actually a phrase?

#1 Edited by believer258 (11979 posts) -

This is just something that's bugged me a little in GTAV. When Franklin and Lamar are standing in front of Franklin's house for the first time, Lamar tells Franklin that he's got a "yee-yee-ass haircut". I know it's just dumb slang, but I'm always out of touch with dumb slang, and I've got to know if "yee-yee" is actually a thing.

It's in the video where Vinny plays GTAV, if you haven't seen it or don't remember it.

Hey, we live in a world where "yolo" and "hella" are actually things that people say, a handful probably unironically, this probably isn't too far-fetched.

#2 Posted by HurricaneIvan29 (626 posts) -

"Yee Yee" is a sort of... "redneck call" haha Yee yee! haha You use it a lot of ways. "You see that buck I got!? Yee yee!" haha Look up earl dibbles jr lol

#3 Posted by believer258 (11979 posts) -

"Yee Yee" is a sort of... "redneck call" haha Yee yee! haha You use it a lot of ways. "You see that buck I got!? Yee yee!" haha Look up earl dibbles jr lol

Well, I did Google search "yee yee ass" before starting this thread and didn't get anywhere. I Google'd "yee yee" after starting this thread and got boobs. And a racist Urban Dictionary entry.

#4 Posted by Nodima (1239 posts) -

It's just a general put-down (street wise), it doesn't really mean much and the fact that you hear it in the game is probably one of the most random occurrences in a game full of them. I'd attribute it to the voice-actor before the script, honestly.

#5 Posted by Strife777 (1604 posts) -

As mentioned by the first post, it's sort of a "redneck" thing. I guess he sort of meant Franklin had a white man's haircut or something.

Doesn't matter, Lamar's awesome. I wasn't sure about him at first, but I grew to like him a whole lot.

#6 Posted by BigJeffrey (5071 posts) -

You ain't from the streets homie?

#7 Posted by BurningStickMan (231 posts) -

Sheeeeit. Lookit all dis besnackity yalla up in dis sha-nay-nay. Wazzal, y'all.

#8 Posted by wjb (1674 posts) -

@hurricaneivan29 said:

"Yee Yee" is a sort of... "redneck call" haha Yee yee! haha You use it a lot of ways. "You see that buck I got!? Yee yee!" haha Look up earl dibbles jr lol

Well, I did Google search "yee yee ass" before starting this thread and didn't get anywhere. I Google'd "yee yee" after starting this thread and got boobs. And a racist Urban Dictionary entry.

I got this thread after Google. (Shakes fist)

I imagine, based on the context clues, that it's something boring or ordinary. A haircut a child has, perhaps?

Maybe it's something only the voice actor and his friends know? I would assume there's a lot of improvisation, or else the Housers put in the n-word as every other word in the script.

#9 Edited by Demoskinos (15007 posts) -
#10 Posted by McGhee (6094 posts) -

"Yee Yee" is a sort of... "redneck call" haha Yee yee! haha You use it a lot of ways. "You see that buck I got!? Yee yee!" haha Look up earl dibbles jr lol

I grew up in the south: Florida, Alabama, and Tennessee and I've never heard this in my life, aside from that awesome turtle wrangler on the TV show, Call of the Wild Man.

#11 Posted by MarkWahlberg (4606 posts) -

It is now, anyway.

#12 Posted by Hailinel (25179 posts) -

@wjb said:

or else the Housers put in the n-word as every other word in the script.

I honestly wouldn't be surprised.

#13 Edited by Yummylee (22034 posts) -
@believer258 said:

@hurricaneivan29 said:

"Yee Yee" is a sort of... "redneck call" haha Yee yee! haha You use it a lot of ways. "You see that buck I got!? Yee yee!" haha Look up earl dibbles jr lol

Well, I did Google search "yee yee ass" before starting this thread and didn't get anywhere. I Google'd "yee yee" after starting this thread and got boobs. And a racist Urban Dictionary entry.

I double-checked -- no, triple-checked just to be sure. And yes, ''yee yee'' does in fact bring up boobs on google.

Anywhoo I think Lamar's the sorta guy that just likes to create his own vocabulary and mess around with pronunciations and the like, Ryan Davis style. Snee-eye-itch is a particular favourite of mine!

Online
#14 Posted by Clonedzero (4200 posts) -

Since this is a thread about learning weird terms.

The fuck does yolo mean?

#15 Edited by Hamst3r (4516 posts) -

Yee yee!

@clonedzero said:

Since this is a thread about learning weird terms.

The fuck does yolo mean?

Obviously.

Online
#16 Posted by believer258 (11979 posts) -

@clonedzero: Hint: It's what happens when James Bond loses a life.

#17 Edited by EuanDewar (5024 posts) -

Slang isn't really something that is as easily quantifiable as you're making it out to be. There's slang phrases that are international and there's some that just singular groups of friends use. I know me and my mates and a fair few other people round here use "Pukka" to describe just anything we like but thats definitely not popular slang here in the uk

Online
#18 Posted by SpaceInsomniac (3809 posts) -

Since this is a thread about learning weird terms.

The fuck does yolo mean?

You Only Live Once. It's usually something stupid that stupid people say before trying something stupid.

Of course, it did lead to this somewhat different take on the phrase.

#19 Posted by Fattony12000 (7515 posts) -

Yes, that is truly a ridiculous obfuscation of the use of language, home slice.

#20 Posted by jimmyfenix (3858 posts) -
#21 Posted by RazielCuts (2971 posts) -

#22 Posted by SamStrife (1286 posts) -

Slang isn't really something that is as easily quantifiable as you're making it out to be. There's slang phrases that are international and there's some that just singular groups of friends use. I know me and my mates and a fair few other people round here use "Pukka" to describe just anything we like but thats definitely not popular slang here in the uk

What you talking about man? "That's Pukka" is a term thrown round my end quite often (I'm from the Midlands). I use a lot...often saying something I like is "Pukka Pie".

#23 Edited by Humanity (9576 posts) -

@hailinel said:

@wjb said:

or else the Housers put in the n-word as every other word in the script.

I honestly wouldn't be surprised.

Honestly, I used to work in a place where a lot of "hood" type people worked as well and thats how they talk. A lot of those doods ended up being good friends of mine but they literally say "n-word" every other word. This is NYC so maybe it's different in other places but it's not exactly out of place. I laughed real hard at all the Lamar lines because he talks EXACTLY like a guy I used to know.

#24 Posted by RazielCuts (2971 posts) -

@euandewar said:

Slang isn't really something that is as easily quantifiable as you're making it out to be. There's slang phrases that are international and there's some that just singular groups of friends use. I know me and my mates and a fair few other people round here use "Pukka" to describe just anything we like but thats definitely not popular slang here in the uk

What you talking about man? "That's Pukka" is a term thrown round my end quite often (I'm from the Midlands). I use a lot...often saying something I like is "Pukka Pie".

Yeah, have to agree with this, 'pukka' is known all over the UK, it's mostly a 90's term though like 'naf' but a lot of mockneys used to use it. Jamie Oliver used to say it ever second word.

#25 Edited by Fattony12000 (7515 posts) -
@razielcuts said:

Yeah, have to agree with this, 'pukka' is known all over the UK, it's mostly a 90's term though like 'naf' but a lot of mockneys used to use it. Jamie Oliver used to say it ever second word.

Wait, what?

The English-oriented use of the word "pukka" has its roots in the days from Great Britain used to rule India, as the original word comes from the Hindi language. If you own a country for a while (say between the dates 1858 and 1947), you tend to pick up some of their customs and habits and resources and foods and culture and produce and wealth and even language (and make it your own, in some cases).

Also, I started hearing it being used on TV, in films and books and out of people's mouths from the 1980s onwards. I'm sure it probably goes back earlier than that in its modern London-centric usage, I want to say the mid 1970s, maybe?

puk·ka also puck·a

adj.

  1. Genuine; authentic.
  2. Superior; first-class.

pukka, pucka

adj (esp in India)

  1. properly or perfectly done, constructed, etc. a pukka road
  2. genuine pukka sahib

[from Hindi pakkā firm, from Sanskrit pakva]

In other, sadder, news...

Pukka Pies founder, Trevor Storer, dies aged 83

The founder of iconic British food company, Pukka Pies, has died aged 83.

Trevor Storer, who set up the firm in his kitchen in 1963, died peacefully at home, a spokesman said.

The company, whose pies are a familiar sight in football grounds and at chip shops, makes about 60 million pies a year from its factory in Syston, Leicestershire and employs 300 people.

In a tribute released by Pukka Pies, Mr Storer was described as putting integrity at the core of the business.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leicestershire-23673441

#26 Edited by TobbRobb (4730 posts) -

@humanity said:

@hailinel said:

@wjb said:

or else the Housers put in the n-word as every other word in the script.

I honestly wouldn't be surprised.

Honestly, I used to work in a place where a lot of "hood" type people worked as well and thats how they talk. A lot of those doods ended up being good friends of mine but they literally say "n-word" every other word. This is NYC so maybe it's different in other places but it's not exactly out of place. I laughed real hard at all the Lamar lines because he talks EXACTLY like a guy I used to know.

Yeah for as much as I legitimately want to complain about how they talk in the game. It's sadly veeery very accurate.

Online
#27 Posted by golguin (3964 posts) -

@tobbrobb said:

@humanity said:

@hailinel said:

@wjb said:

or else the Housers put in the n-word as every other word in the script.

I honestly wouldn't be surprised.

Honestly, I used to work in a place where a lot of "hood" type people worked as well and thats how they talk. A lot of those doods ended up being good friends of mine but they literally say "n-word" every other word. This is NYC so maybe it's different in other places but it's not exactly out of place. I laughed real hard at all the Lamar lines because he talks EXACTLY like a guy I used to know.

Yeah for as much as I legitimately want to complain about how they talk in the game. It's sadly veeery very accurate.

Lamar and Franklin be keepin it real. Straight up.

#28 Posted by audioBusting (1611 posts) -

Yee yee yee yee yee, live action yeah!

#29 Posted by EuanDewar (5024 posts) -

@samstrife said:

@euandewar said:

Slang isn't really something that is as easily quantifiable as you're making it out to be. There's slang phrases that are international and there's some that just singular groups of friends use. I know me and my mates and a fair few other people round here use "Pukka" to describe just anything we like but thats definitely not popular slang here in the uk

What you talking about man? "That's Pukka" is a term thrown round my end quite often (I'm from the Midlands). I use a lot...often saying something I like is "Pukka Pie".

Yeah, have to agree with this, 'pukka' is known all over the UK, it's mostly a 90's term though like 'naf' but a lot of mockneys used to use it. Jamie Oliver used to say it ever second word.

oh really? you learn something new every day :D

Online
#30 Edited by Ghostiet (5289 posts) -

You should watch "The Wire".

#31 Posted by Bollard (5660 posts) -

@razielcuts said:

Yeah, have to agree with this, 'pukka' is known all over the UK, it's mostly a 90's term though like 'naf' but a lot of mockneys used to use it. Jamie Oliver used to say it ever second word.

Wait, what?

The English-oriented use of the word "pukka" has its roots in the days from Great Britain used to rule India, as the original word comes from the Hindi language. If you own a country for a while (say between the dates 1858 and 1947), you tend to pick up some of their customs and habits and resources and foods and culture and produce and wealth and even language (and make it your own, in some cases).

Also, I started hearing it being used on TV, in films and books and out of people's mouths from the 1980s onwards. I'm sure it probably goes back earlier than that in its modern London-centric usage, I want to say the mid 1970s, maybe?

puk·ka also puck·a

adj.

  1. Genuine; authentic.
  2. Superior; first-class.

pukka, pucka

adj (esp in India)

  1. properly or perfectly done, constructed, etc. a pukka road
  2. genuine pukka sahib

[from Hindi pakkā firm, from Sanskrit pakva]

In other, sadder, news...

Pukka Pies founder, Trevor Storer, dies aged 83

The founder of iconic British food company, Pukka Pies, has died aged 83.

Trevor Storer, who set up the firm in his kitchen in 1963, died peacefully at home, a spokesman said.

The company, whose pies are a familiar sight in football grounds and at chip shops, makes about 60 million pies a year from its factory in Syston, Leicestershire and employs 300 people.

In a tribute released by Pukka Pies, Mr Storer was described as putting integrity at the core of the business.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leicestershire-23673441

I was about to say, there's a company named Pukka freaking Pies so it can't be that obscure a slang term.

#32 Posted by wemibelec90 (1737 posts) -

I feel like I need a glossary sometimes with this game, especially the early sections. A few times, I was scratching my head and wondering what the fuck a certain word was supposed to mean. Some of those words I had never even seen before.

#33 Posted by The_Ruiner (1077 posts) -

The voice actor for Lamar is a writer for the Boondocks and played Black Jesus on the Boondocks Bootleg Youtube channel. I get the feeling he is a dude that says a lot of random shit. It's also worth noting that in the Black Jesus shorts, instead of "jeans" he often says "yeans". So maybe he's actually saying "Gee Gee"?

Online
#34 Edited by Nodima (1239 posts) -

The voice actor for Lamar is a writer for the Boondocks and played Black Jesus on the Boondocks Bootleg Youtube channel. I get the feeling he is a dude that says a lot of random shit. It's also worth noting that in the Black Jesus shorts, instead of "jeans" he often says "yeans". So maybe he's actually saying "Gee Gee"?

Naw, that's more of a Philly thing, from the late-90s jawn(usually a female but essentially just a noun) / Jorn (Jordan brand) era.

#35 Edited by myketuna (1723 posts) -

@the_ruiner said:

The voice actor for Lamar is a writer for the Boondocks and played Black Jesus on the Boondocks Bootleg Youtube channel. I get the feeling he is a dude that says a lot of random shit. It's also worth noting that in the Black Jesus shorts, instead of "jeans" he often says "yeans". So maybe he's actually saying "Gee Gee"?

No shit? I recognized his voice immediately from the game play videos and twitch streams I was watching around release (I'm waiting for PC), but I couldn't find the dude's name or the name of Lamar's voice actor to verify on day one.

Anyway, I think it's probably either slang that is used specifically by the voice actor and his group of friends that hasn't broken into other circles or some gibberish he improvised on the spot.

#36 Posted by chrismafuchris (1088 posts) -

In a recent interview, the voice actor elucidated that he was actually referencing the French genre of music yé-yé, popularized in the 60s by artists such as France Gall and Serge Gainsbourg, with that line.

#37 Edited by Fattony12000 (7515 posts) -
#38 Posted by SecondPersonShooter (620 posts) -

Mark-ass

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