Help a fellow duder out guys.

#1 Posted by Demoskinos (15032 posts) -

Okay so here is the deal fellow duder otherwise known as David S. Gallant worked for the Canada Revenue Agency in a call center fielding tax payers calls. Having followed David for awhile ever since I met him via Retroids (a gaming community) he has been very into the indie scene and has ever so slowly worked his way onto the scene himself making many different games at various game jams and on his own time. I tell you this because today David was fired. If you're asking why you should care or why well its because he is the creator of I Get this call everyday. This is a game that David made about his job dealing with Canada's tax payers. He launched the game on his website. Well, appears the CRA wasn't none amused with this and today he was fired.

So, look he sells the game for $2 on his website (you can pay more if you want) but if you can spare $2 I'd urge you guy buy the game and also vote for it on steam greenlight. I think its great that he has actually had the balls to express himself and launch his game knowing that this could very well put his job in jeopardy. So if you have it in your heart help a budding game indie game developer out and help him fully realize his dream of being able to do this full time. Hell even Mr. Kevin VanOrd has endorsed the game as well as it being featured on Kotaku.

Thanks guys~!

#2 Posted by SexyToad (2760 posts) -

That really sucks. I voted for it on steam and wish the best of luck to him.

#3 Posted by killacam (1285 posts) -

That's... really fucked up. Is that legal? Does it matter?

#4 Posted by The_Laughing_Man (13629 posts) -
@killacam said:

That's... really fucked up. Is that legal? Does it matter?

Chances are it steps on customer confidentially 
#5 Posted by BisonHero (6674 posts) -

@The_Laughing_Man said:

@killacam said:

That's... really fucked up. Is that legal? Does it matter?

Chances are it steps on customer confidentially

Which pisses me off, because seriously, how? It doesn't use any actual customers or customer information. It's a broad impression of how soul crushing it is to work in a call center job.

#6 Posted by The_Laughing_Man (13629 posts) -
@BisonHero said:

@The_Laughing_Man said:

@killacam said:

That's... really fucked up. Is that legal? Does it matter?

Chances are it steps on customer confidentially

Which pisses me off, because seriously, how? It doesn't use any actual customers or customer information. It's a broad impression of how soul crushing it is to work in a call center job.

Maybe the name used in the game is a actual customer. Maybe this is a real case that happened. 
#7 Posted by Demoskinos (15032 posts) -

@The_Laughing_Man said:

@BisonHero said:

@The_Laughing_Man said:

@killacam said:

That's... really fucked up. Is that legal? Does it matter?

Chances are it steps on customer confidentially

Which pisses me off, because seriously, how? It doesn't use any actual customers or customer information. It's a broad impression of how soul crushing it is to work in a call center job.

Maybe the name used in the game is a actual customer. Maybe this is a real case that happened.

I don't think that is the case. But if you've played the game its basically a real life kobayashi maru its entirely un-winnable. Either you end up being a dick to the guy and you get fired or you help him by stepping over the bounds of what your allowed to do and get fired or nothing gets resolved.

#8 Posted by Zvarri (123 posts) -

@killacam: Unfortunately legal.

#9 Posted by Zvarri (123 posts) -

@The_Laughing_Man: It didn't.

#10 Posted by ArtisanBreads (3890 posts) -

@Zvarri said:

@killacam: Unfortunately legal.

Bummer man.

I'll check out the game. I've always wanted to make that leap myself and have made some baby steps towards it. Unfortunately you have been thrust into it.

Best of luck.

#11 Posted by Zvarri (123 posts) -

@ArtisanBreads: I've been making games part-time for the past 1.5 years, so I don't know if "thrust" is the right word... but yeah, it's time to find a job to pay the bills, or suddenly create the next Angry Birds in a month.

Pretty sure that second thing ain't happening.

#12 Edited by BraveToaster (12588 posts) -

I saw his game on Steamlight a few weeks ago and I down-voted. I really don't want to come off as being harsh, but there are a ton of budding Indie game developers who need help. Many of these people have their own sob stories, but I've reached the point where sob stories don't cut it when it comes to giving my money away. We get a lot of threads about game developers going through hard times. Hell, a lot of people are going through hard times, I just want a better reason to give my money to one person instead of the other.

#13 Posted by ArtelinaRose (1856 posts) -

@Zvarri said:

@ArtisanBreads: I've been making games part-time for the past 1.5 years, so I don't know if "thrust" is the right word... but yeah, it's time to find a job to pay the bills, or suddenly create the next Angry Birds in a month.

Pretty sure that second thing ain't happening.

Maybe not, but the idea behind it could be the motivation to get you to create the next one! Being mechanically simple doesn't make a game bad. Angry Birds has one idea, throw shit at other shit, but it found a way to make it fun.

#14 Posted by RockyRaccoon37 (468 posts) -

@BraveToaster said:

I saw his game on Steamlight a few weeks ago and I down-voted. I really don't want to come off as being harsh, but there are a ton of budding Indie game developers who need help. Many of these people have their own sob stories, but I've reached the point where sob stories don't cut it when it comes to giving my money away. We get a lot of threads about game developers going through hard times. Hell, a lot of people are going through hard times, I just want a better reason to give my money to one person instead of the other.

It's $2.

If you don't want to spend it, fine. But no need to proclaim to the world that you're an asshole.

No one is asking you to decide to spend your money on a game based solely on whether or not they're struggling and have a "sob story". Buy a game if it interests you. Support a developer if you feel moved to.

I heard about this game when it came out, but wasn't sure if it would be for me. Then I heard about this, read more about the game and the developer and decided I wanted to purchase it, in part to support him in what little way I can. So I didn't purchase it purely based on the fact that the dude is going through a tough time, but yes it played into it-- like anything else there was a range of reasons that led me to buy the game, not just one motivating factor.

#15 Posted by Kaowas (124 posts) -

I've now bought and played I Get This Call Every Day and it's a fascinating little game. As a fellow customer service agent it plays like a "how not to fuck up a call" simulator or a "how patient are you, really?" game. Also if you try hard enough you can get the "good" ending for realsies. So as soon as I read the Kobayashi Maru statement from I felt like James T Kirk. But still I agree with the underlying statement of this game: I absolutely get this call every day. And about 5 to 6 times a day.

#16 Posted by Zvarri (123 posts) -

@Kaowas: Aw man. I feel for everyone still in this position. But I'm glad you enjoyed the game. Thank you for your support!

#17 Posted by Zella (777 posts) -

Having worked a really similar job I can totally appreciate having to deal with dumbasses over the phone. Up voted on Greenlight and will pick it up next time I grab a Visa Giftcard.

#18 Posted by BraveToaster (12588 posts) -

@RockyRaccoon37 said:

@BraveToaster said:

I saw his game on Steamlight a few weeks ago and I down-voted. I really don't want to come off as being harsh, but there are a ton of budding Indie game developers who need help. Many of these people have their own sob stories, but I've reached the point where sob stories don't cut it when it comes to giving my money away. We get a lot of threads about game developers going through hard times. Hell, a lot of people are going through hard times, I just want a better reason to give my money to one person instead of the other.

It's $2.

If you don't want to spend it, fine. But no need to proclaim to the world that you're an asshole.

No one is asking you to decide to spend your money on a game based solely on whether or not they're struggling and have a "sob story". Buy a game if it interests you. Support a developer if you feel moved to.

I heard about this game when it came out, but wasn't sure if it would be for me. Then I heard about this, read more about the game and the developer and decided I wanted to purchase it, in part to support him in what little way I can. So I didn't purchase it purely based on the fact that the dude is going through a tough time, but yes it played into it-- like anything else there was a range of reasons that led me to buy the game, not just one motivating factor.

You can call me an asshole and whatever else you want, I don't care. I hear/read stories like this often, the frequency seems to have spiked in recent years. Perhaps Indie developers should find a better way to get people to buy their work, instead of resorting to sad stories like some Feed the Children infomercial. If you want to give him your money, fine, but don't come at me about being an asshole when you're being one yourself.

#19 Posted by Thompson820 (410 posts) -

@BraveToaster said:

@RockyRaccoon37 said:

@BraveToaster said:

I saw his game on Steamlight a few weeks ago and I down-voted. I really don't want to come off as being harsh, but there are a ton of budding Indie game developers who need help. Many of these people have their own sob stories, but I've reached the point where sob stories don't cut it when it comes to giving my money away. We get a lot of threads about game developers going through hard times. Hell, a lot of people are going through hard times, I just want a better reason to give my money to one person instead of the other.

It's $2.

If you don't want to spend it, fine. But no need to proclaim to the world that you're an asshole.

No one is asking you to decide to spend your money on a game based solely on whether or not they're struggling and have a "sob story". Buy a game if it interests you. Support a developer if you feel moved to.

I heard about this game when it came out, but wasn't sure if it would be for me. Then I heard about this, read more about the game and the developer and decided I wanted to purchase it, in part to support him in what little way I can. So I didn't purchase it purely based on the fact that the dude is going through a tough time, but yes it played into it-- like anything else there was a range of reasons that led me to buy the game, not just one motivating factor.

You can call me an asshole and whatever else you want, I don't care. I hear/read stories like this often, the frequency seems to have spiked in recent years. Perhaps Indie developers should find a better way to get people to buy their work, instead of resorting to sad stories like some Feed the Children infomercial. If you want to give him your money, fine, but don't come at me about being an asshole when you're being one yourself.

See the problem is that you really are being the asshole, not that guy.

#20 Posted by Demoskinos (15032 posts) -

@BraveToaster said:

@RockyRaccoon37 said:

@BraveToaster said:

I saw his game on Steamlight a few weeks ago and I down-voted. I really don't want to come off as being harsh, but there are a ton of budding Indie game developers who need help. Many of these people have their own sob stories, but I've reached the point where sob stories don't cut it when it comes to giving my money away. We get a lot of threads about game developers going through hard times. Hell, a lot of people are going through hard times, I just want a better reason to give my money to one person instead of the other.

It's $2.

If you don't want to spend it, fine. But no need to proclaim to the world that you're an asshole.

No one is asking you to decide to spend your money on a game based solely on whether or not they're struggling and have a "sob story". Buy a game if it interests you. Support a developer if you feel moved to.

I heard about this game when it came out, but wasn't sure if it would be for me. Then I heard about this, read more about the game and the developer and decided I wanted to purchase it, in part to support him in what little way I can. So I didn't purchase it purely based on the fact that the dude is going through a tough time, but yes it played into it-- like anything else there was a range of reasons that led me to buy the game, not just one motivating factor.

You can call me an asshole and whatever else you want, I don't care. I hear/read stories like this often, the frequency seems to have spiked in recent years. Perhaps Indie developers should find a better way to get people to buy their work, instead of resorting to sad stories like some Feed the Children infomercial. If you want to give him your money, fine, but don't come at me about being an asshole when you're being one yourself.

No dude, you're being the asshole. If you have no intentions in contributing that's just fine and dandy but then don't enter the conversation because you have nothing to add. So please just leave.

#21 Posted by TheHT (11549 posts) -

@BraveToaster said:

@RockyRaccoon37 said:

@BraveToaster said:

I saw his game on Steamlight a few weeks ago and I down-voted. I really don't want to come off as being harsh, but there are a ton of budding Indie game developers who need help. Many of these people have their own sob stories, but I've reached the point where sob stories don't cut it when it comes to giving my money away. We get a lot of threads about game developers going through hard times. Hell, a lot of people are going through hard times, I just want a better reason to give my money to one person instead of the other.

It's $2.

If you don't want to spend it, fine. But no need to proclaim to the world that you're an asshole.

No one is asking you to decide to spend your money on a game based solely on whether or not they're struggling and have a "sob story". Buy a game if it interests you. Support a developer if you feel moved to.

I heard about this game when it came out, but wasn't sure if it would be for me. Then I heard about this, read more about the game and the developer and decided I wanted to purchase it, in part to support him in what little way I can. So I didn't purchase it purely based on the fact that the dude is going through a tough time, but yes it played into it-- like anything else there was a range of reasons that led me to buy the game, not just one motivating factor.

You can call me an asshole and whatever else you want, I don't care. I hear/read stories like this often, the frequency seems to have spiked in recent years. Perhaps Indie developers should find a better way to get people to buy their work, instead of resorting to sad stories like some Feed the Children infomercial. If you want to give him your money, fine, but don't come at me about being an asshole when you're being one yourself.

as others have pointed out, you're totally being an asshole. you also have a fair point, which is the real sucky part about your assholiness. come on man, have some tact!

also, unless the dev is behind this thread (i doubt it), he isn't resorting to a sob story. so yeah, probably not the best place to vent about that sort of thing.

#22 Edited by BD_Mr_Bubbles (1702 posts) -

@Zvarri said:

@killacam: Unfortunately legal.

That is BS, I bought the game from your site, I'll vote for it on greenlight.

#23 Posted by MrBrian (74 posts) -

I bought/played it and actually it made me think that having a call center job might not be too bad!

#24 Posted by BisonHero (6674 posts) -

@TheHT said:

also, unless the dev is behind this thread (i doubt it), he isn't resorting to a sob story. so yeah, probably not the best place to vent about that sort of thing.

Just so we're clear, Zvarri is the username of the guy who developed the game (and subsequently lost his job). Though yes, he didn't create the thread - Demoskinos did.

#25 Posted by Estelindis (1 posts) -

Bought and played the game today. I really enjoyed it. It tested my patience, but games are *supposed* to test the player. At the end, I felt victorious, even though I didn't seem to have achieved anything through the call. Maybe the customer would call back later with the information to properly answer his security questions. Maybe he wouldn't. It was his choice. I felt like my job had been done as best as it could be. I had been patient, helpful and informative.

I would say "maybe I should actually work in a call centre," but fielding one call successfully is a different kettle of fish to fielding dozens and dozens, day after day.

In any case, it was a good game. Thanks to Zvarri. I hope it becomes a really big success leading to further successes, and that losing the job eventually ends up being the best thing that could have happened to you.

#26 Posted by NinjaBerd (221 posts) -

I haven't played the game, but I was formerly a representative and eventually a manager in a call center and I can tell you from experience if he copied even the most minor of procedural things reps do that is cause for termination.

Heck we terminated reps on a consistent basis just for saying our company name. You were not allowed to because we were supposed to be representing the company you thought you were calling not our own company.

#27 Posted by ShadowConqueror (3067 posts) -

Just saw a story about this on newser and I instantly knew who it was after reading this thread yesterday.

I feel sorry for the dude, but he probably should have used a pseudonym to release the game under to protect his anonymity.

#28 Posted by Hunkulese (2795 posts) -

It sucks but he had to have known that this was a probable outcome when he released the game.

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