On Kickstarter, There Are No Guarantees

Posted by patrickklepek (2208 posts) -

UPDATE: Auditorium 2: Duet hit its Kickstarter goal last night, building upon momentum from the past few days.

--

Crowd funding service Kickstarter has been good to games in recent months.

$3,336,371 went towards Double Fine's new adventure game, far above the $400,000 asking price. There's $1,600,465 and counting for inXile Entertainment to produce Wasteland 2, exceeding the original $900,000.

Philadelphia-based Cipher Prime wants $60,000 to help fund the creation of Auditorium 2: Duet, a multiplayer sequel to its well-liked music game. $60,000 is roughly half, maybe a little less, than the project’s total budget.

“We are mathematically not on track to make it,” said creative director Will Stallwood to me yesterday afternoon, only four days before Auditorium 2: Duet’s Kickstarter proposal comes to a close.

Stallwood is understandably anxious. Auditorium 2: Duet has not experienced the "Double Fine bump” that I've heard mentioned by other video game Kickstarter projects, and the studio is relying on a hail mary pass at the end.

“When we first started,” he said, “someone asked us and our analogy was ‘we basically have a month of waiting to find out if our girlfriend’s going to dump us or not.’ It’s totally how it feels.”

When we spoke yesterday, his Kickstarter was roughly $45,000--most of the way there. With Kickstarter, though, “most of the way there” isn’t enough. You need to reach the full amount, or all of that money disappears.

If Auditorium 2: Duet doesn’t reach $60,000, it wouldn’t be the first game to stumble on Kickstarter. Double Fine was not the first developer to utilize Kickstarter, but it’s definitely helped popularize the concept. Kickstarter was founded in 2008, and since, many have tried using it to get ideas off the ground. Not everyone's a success story.

Pixel Sand is one of several projects that attribute its funding success to Double Fine.

Tony Hawk: Ride developers Robomodo tried to help fund Bodoink, a Kinect game for Xbox Live Arcade, and only raised $5,547 of $35,000. Before Borut Pfeifer was a designer on upcoming XBLA strategy game Skulls of the Shogun, he pitched a puzzle/action game set during the post-election riots in Iran. He figured it would take $15,000 to make that game--he got only $2,925.

“The biggest lesson was just that it doesn't actually solve the problems people originally (and still do but to a lesser extent) thought it would,” said Pfeifer over email.

Pfeifer pointed to how developers still have to really, really worry about presenting and pitching their idea, especially if there's not much to show for it, and they still have to answer to a group of invested individuals, which means creative autonomy is somewhat limited. It's not a perfect solution.

Plus, it’s easy to forget designers like Tim Schafer and Brian Fargo have spent a career building a reputation.

“The audience isn't necessarily any more likely to fund an idea because it's risky or innovative, it's really just if they trust you as fans of your work,” said Pfeifer.

As the hours wind down on Auditorium 2: Duet, as Stallwood begins to confront the possibility that his sequel will not get funded, his team has started to examine about what went right...and what went wrong. Even if the Kickstarter idea blows up in their face, Stallwood doesn’t necessarily regret trying it out.

“Definitely our biggest problem over here that we know, and I think we’ve always known, is getting any kind of attention is really hard, and we still don’t know how to do it,” he said. “Regardless of whether the Kickstarter fails or not, I do feel like a lot more people know who Cipher Prime is, which is really cool and super exciting.”

It’s early days for the relationship between Kickstarter and video games, however. While Cipher Prime didn’t see much help from Double Fine’s various financing spikes, another Kickstarter did.

Pixel Sand, a ridiculous physics simulation that involves dumping sand everywhere, probably wouldn’t have made it to its complete $9,000 funding without help from Double Fine, according to programmer Trevor Sundberg.

“We pretty much owe our success to Double Fine for bringing in so many supporters to Kickstarter,” said Sundberg. “All of that traffic seemed to hit right after the Double Fine project became popular.”

A week before Pixel Sand was due to cross the Kickstarter finish line, the project’s funding trajectory suggested it would only make around $2,000. 24 hours before funding closed, the game neared $12,000. 68% of its contributors came from individuals just browsing the Kickstarter website, a mix of people who’d meandered from the Double Fine Kickstarter and others poking around the games section, which Sundberg also attributed to Double Fine.

Pixel Sand's final total? $13, 616.

Between Double Fine and inXile, Kickstarter appears to be fertile ground for reviving long forgotten concepts, genres and franchises. It’s unclear how many more fans will continue to financially rally behind old games, but Big Finish Games will try to revive fumbling detective Tex Murphy starting in May.

Tex Murphy is the latest dead franchise seeking life on Kickstarter, but how long will this last?

Big Finish co-founder Chris Jones, who also happens to play the usually tipsy Tex Murphy, told me this presented itself as the best way to finally, possibly bring the character back. There were chances for Tex Murphy to return in the past, but it never happened, and eventually Jones felt like fans deserved closure. The last game ended on a mean cliffhanger, and fans have been waiting since.

Kickstarter seemed like a way to gauge fan interest, and possibly elevate what Jones described as a “modest” design for another Tex Murphy game into something much bigger.

“When we saw the success of Double Fine [on Kickstarter],” he said, “what that really showed more than anything was there really is an interest in this genre, whether publishers believe it or not, there are a lot of people out there who really have liked this style of game, and enjoy playing the adventure style, and there may be a big enough group out there that would continue to support it.”

If there isn’t, it’s also the best way to find out if it’s time to move on, and possibly let Tex Murphy go.

A full day had passed between writing this and my conversation with Stallwood about Auditorium 2: Duet's fate. Since then, the Kickstarter has earned another $6,000, bringing the total to $52,801. There’s $9,000 to go.

“With the bump last night, we could possibly reach our goal,” he said. “We feel like throwing up in anticipation, but we're incredibly hopeful. Regardless of the outcome, I think we have some of the worlds best fans and an amazing support community in Philly. Getting close to our goal after all this time is giving us a ton of feelings both scary and happy.”

With three days left, here's where Auditorium 2: Duet stands. The countdown begins.

#1 Posted by patrickklepek (2208 posts) -

UPDATE: Auditorium 2: Duet hit its Kickstarter goal last night, building upon momentum from the past few days.

--

Crowd funding service Kickstarter has been good to games in recent months.

$3,336,371 went towards Double Fine's new adventure game, far above the $400,000 asking price. There's $1,600,465 and counting for inXile Entertainment to produce Wasteland 2, exceeding the original $900,000.

Philadelphia-based Cipher Prime wants $60,000 to help fund the creation of Auditorium 2: Duet, a multiplayer sequel to its well-liked music game. $60,000 is roughly half, maybe a little less, than the project’s total budget.

“We are mathematically not on track to make it,” said creative director Will Stallwood to me yesterday afternoon, only four days before Auditorium 2: Duet’s Kickstarter proposal comes to a close.

Stallwood is understandably anxious. Auditorium 2: Duet has not experienced the "Double Fine bump” that I've heard mentioned by other video game Kickstarter projects, and the studio is relying on a hail mary pass at the end.

“When we first started,” he said, “someone asked us and our analogy was ‘we basically have a month of waiting to find out if our girlfriend’s going to dump us or not.’ It’s totally how it feels.”

When we spoke yesterday, his Kickstarter was roughly $45,000--most of the way there. With Kickstarter, though, “most of the way there” isn’t enough. You need to reach the full amount, or all of that money disappears.

If Auditorium 2: Duet doesn’t reach $60,000, it wouldn’t be the first game to stumble on Kickstarter. Double Fine was not the first developer to utilize Kickstarter, but it’s definitely helped popularize the concept. Kickstarter was founded in 2008, and since, many have tried using it to get ideas off the ground. Not everyone's a success story.

Pixel Sand is one of several projects that attribute its funding success to Double Fine.

Tony Hawk: Ride developers Robomodo tried to help fund Bodoink, a Kinect game for Xbox Live Arcade, and only raised $5,547 of $35,000. Before Borut Pfeifer was a designer on upcoming XBLA strategy game Skulls of the Shogun, he pitched a puzzle/action game set during the post-election riots in Iran. He figured it would take $15,000 to make that game--he got only $2,925.

“The biggest lesson was just that it doesn't actually solve the problems people originally (and still do but to a lesser extent) thought it would,” said Pfeifer over email.

Pfeifer pointed to how developers still have to really, really worry about presenting and pitching their idea, especially if there's not much to show for it, and they still have to answer to a group of invested individuals, which means creative autonomy is somewhat limited. It's not a perfect solution.

Plus, it’s easy to forget designers like Tim Schafer and Brian Fargo have spent a career building a reputation.

“The audience isn't necessarily any more likely to fund an idea because it's risky or innovative, it's really just if they trust you as fans of your work,” said Pfeifer.

As the hours wind down on Auditorium 2: Duet, as Stallwood begins to confront the possibility that his sequel will not get funded, his team has started to examine about what went right...and what went wrong. Even if the Kickstarter idea blows up in their face, Stallwood doesn’t necessarily regret trying it out.

“Definitely our biggest problem over here that we know, and I think we’ve always known, is getting any kind of attention is really hard, and we still don’t know how to do it,” he said. “Regardless of whether the Kickstarter fails or not, I do feel like a lot more people know who Cipher Prime is, which is really cool and super exciting.”

It’s early days for the relationship between Kickstarter and video games, however. While Cipher Prime didn’t see much help from Double Fine’s various financing spikes, another Kickstarter did.

Pixel Sand, a ridiculous physics simulation that involves dumping sand everywhere, probably wouldn’t have made it to its complete $9,000 funding without help from Double Fine, according to programmer Trevor Sundberg.

“We pretty much owe our success to Double Fine for bringing in so many supporters to Kickstarter,” said Sundberg. “All of that traffic seemed to hit right after the Double Fine project became popular.”

A week before Pixel Sand was due to cross the Kickstarter finish line, the project’s funding trajectory suggested it would only make around $2,000. 24 hours before funding closed, the game neared $12,000. 68% of its contributors came from individuals just browsing the Kickstarter website, a mix of people who’d meandered from the Double Fine Kickstarter and others poking around the games section, which Sundberg also attributed to Double Fine.

Pixel Sand's final total? $13, 616.

Between Double Fine and inXile, Kickstarter appears to be fertile ground for reviving long forgotten concepts, genres and franchises. It’s unclear how many more fans will continue to financially rally behind old games, but Big Finish Games will try to revive fumbling detective Tex Murphy starting in May.

Tex Murphy is the latest dead franchise seeking life on Kickstarter, but how long will this last?

Big Finish co-founder Chris Jones, who also happens to play the usually tipsy Tex Murphy, told me this presented itself as the best way to finally, possibly bring the character back. There were chances for Tex Murphy to return in the past, but it never happened, and eventually Jones felt like fans deserved closure. The last game ended on a mean cliffhanger, and fans have been waiting since.

Kickstarter seemed like a way to gauge fan interest, and possibly elevate what Jones described as a “modest” design for another Tex Murphy game into something much bigger.

“When we saw the success of Double Fine [on Kickstarter],” he said, “what that really showed more than anything was there really is an interest in this genre, whether publishers believe it or not, there are a lot of people out there who really have liked this style of game, and enjoy playing the adventure style, and there may be a big enough group out there that would continue to support it.”

If there isn’t, it’s also the best way to find out if it’s time to move on, and possibly let Tex Murphy go.

A full day had passed between writing this and my conversation with Stallwood about Auditorium 2: Duet's fate. Since then, the Kickstarter has earned another $6,000, bringing the total to $52,801. There’s $9,000 to go.

“With the bump last night, we could possibly reach our goal,” he said. “We feel like throwing up in anticipation, but we're incredibly hopeful. Regardless of the outcome, I think we have some of the worlds best fans and an amazing support community in Philly. Getting close to our goal after all this time is giving us a ton of feelings both scary and happy.”

With three days left, here's where Auditorium 2: Duet stands. The countdown begins.

#2 Posted by kist (208 posts) -

A lot of kickstarter these days

#3 Posted by Tim_the_Corsair (3065 posts) -

The bubble was always going to burst

#4 Posted by Master_Thief (32 posts) -

cool

#5 Posted by Soap (3640 posts) -

No one ever thought this was going to be the new way of getting games made did they? It was a one off that spilled over into a few other projects.

Online
#6 Edited by Krakn3Dfx (2502 posts) -

I liked Auditorium, but I've already thrown $15-$50 at at least 3 different projects, so, yeah, I feel for them, and hopefully a little publicity will get them where they need to be, but I'm currently tapped out.

Maybe if they included a cloth map...

#7 Posted by pickassoreborn (534 posts) -

Unsuccessful Kickstarter projects = unpromoted Kickstarter projects. Those devs should have pimped themselves harder, especially in the face of such internet titans like Schafer.

#8 Posted by Vitor (2832 posts) -

Oh man, Auditorium was an awesome game. I remember when it was just a concept web page. Might have to head over to kickstarter myself now...

#9 Edited by mrsmiley (1145 posts) -

More than anything I feel like there are two keys to succeeding on Kickstarter:

1. Having a cool project that captures people's interest (generally by having something to show at the start).

2. Getting the word out there any and every way you can.

Obviously the latter is much easier for someone like Tim Schaffer, but it's not impossible to hit news sites like Kotaku or Giantbomb if you actually have something cool or interesting to show for your project at launch.

#10 Posted by AlexW00d (6431 posts) -

To reiterate the point made in this article, something like Kickstarter was never gonna help the little guy who couldn't get a publishing deal/funding to make the game he wanted to make, and it was only ever going to help the big names who people already know and who could easily fund their own game or gain a publishing deal easily.
Double Fine should donate all that extra money to all these kickstarters that actually need kickstarting.

#11 Posted by Perrin (46 posts) -

There's been a ton of indie devs trying and failing to kickstart fund their passion projects for some time now. It's taken Tim Schaefer to really show the masses what was already going on there. It's obviously quite depressing for some developers who don't get the money they need but it's also understandable in many cases.

There's a lot of first time devs trying to convince people they'll make an epic game if only someone pays their salary for a year or so. I kind of feel like these projects should fail to get funding because these are people full of ambition, lacking in experience asking to someone else to pay for them to probably fail.

I think Double Fine and Wasteland showed the more positive potential for Kickstarter, that established developers with small to medium size projects that would appeal to the public but not to publishers can get their audience to pay up front and make it happen. It's just still gonna be an uphill slog for the lesser known or more inexperienced devs, who are going to need to ask for more modest amounts or do some amazing marketing.

#12 Posted by Rirse (275 posts) -

And add to this Obsidian starting a kickstarter soon to help raise funds to stay alive/make a top down rpg.

#13 Edited by nERVEcenter (190 posts) -

@Tim_the_Corsair: The bubble never existed. Tim Schafer simply has the reputation, the dedication, and most certainly the means to deliver on a concept that a lot of people wanted. Indie studios creating experimental games may have the dedication, but don't have the reputation and may or may not have the means to deliver on the concept.

Tim Schafer is also a giant when it comes to marketing to the Internet crowd. People are always listening to him. His name carries enough weight that people practically have their fingers to his pulse at all times. Indie studios do not share in that.

Anybody attempting to cash in on Double Fine's success, aside from Brian Fargo, was already doomed to failure.

#14 Posted by Winternet (8052 posts) -

I bet that Auditorium 2 kickstarter won't fail.

#15 Posted by SpunkyHePanda (1741 posts) -

Well, this article might help a bit.

#16 Posted by JazGalaxy (1576 posts) -

Is it fair to call it a bubble bursting if projects don't get funded?

I don't know who any of these people are and don't care about any of their games. But, if Roberta WIllians threw up a kickstarter tomorrow for Kings Quest, it would get funded in a few hours.

This patronage system will always be boom and bust.

#17 Posted by dvorak (1497 posts) -

There's a lot of things that are super shady about how Kickstarter funding works. The originators could easily use the super high end donation brackets as ways to end up getting their money even if they don't actually meet their goals. I've watched a couple game Kickstarters (In Profundis for example) minutes before the end get a huge donation jump. We're talking like 30% of the required funding to 100% in a couple hours. Every other site is reporting on that tactical shooter that's not meeting the mark, so you could watch that one.

Even still, buying into your own Kickstarter isn't even really against the rules. Kickstarters aren't investments, and they aren't binding contracts. It is what it is, and I love the idea, but at some point there's going to be a serious expose on how people are abusing it. It's just a matter of time.

Really what is just a matter of time though is someone taking the Kickstarter model and making a gaming-centric version of it, or even just developers directly running a similar program. It's a hell of a thing, that's for sure, but we're really only at the birth of this whole concept. It's like 1997 eBay right here.

#18 Posted by cikame (1073 posts) -

I guess you could make an early version of the game and show it to various sites, like Giant Bomb, to get the word out that people can donate.
In this case the game is a sequel to something that was apparently cool so it shouldn't be that hard to convince people.

#19 Posted by prestonhedges (1961 posts) -

This is how it's supposed to work. You let the people decide, sometimes they'll decide your project isn't good enough.

#20 Posted by Shivoa (645 posts) -

The Realistic Team-Based Shooter project also seems unlikely to make it via Kickstarter (and being the even more nebulous version of direct funding - it is limited direct funding to show gamer enthusiasm to generate real funding to pay for the actual game development and so you're really taking a risk giving money for potentially nothing to come from it beyond a 'we tried real hard and spend your money staying afloat for 3 months' message - I can't say I'm totally surprised that it won't hit their target).

#21 Posted by Winsord (1300 posts) -

Auditorium was a very neat game, so I hope they can make it to $60,000. They're at $52,296 with three days to go at this point, so hopefully they can get enough of a bump to just pass $60,000.

#22 Posted by Acheron (54 posts) -

I had a Kickstarter thing back in November. While it was successful, I wish that I had a chance to ride this recent money wave.

#23 Posted by super2j (1784 posts) -

interesting article, i dont know how u keep getting me to read these things, maybe its because this seems like u did the proper legwork

#24 Posted by Sergio (2243 posts) -

At the end of the day, it comes down to whether or not people want to play the game they're selling, considering some of the rewards include the finished product. Instead of a publisher deciding if they think people would be interested in buying it so that they can recoup their investment with a profit, it now falls on individuals like myself who decide if we'd want to play that game.

Unfortunately in the case of Auditorium 2: Duet, I took a pass because I'm not looking to play a multiplayer music game. While I do agree that lesser known developers might not get the funding as better known developers with longer track records might, this wasn't the case for me when it came to Cipher Prime. I really dug their other game, Pulse: Volume One.

#25 Posted by BrockNRolla (1694 posts) -

I'm really amazed at the amount of crap that is getting funded. I perused the game listings the other day and the number of half-baked, nostalgia induced, unoriginal ideas is astounding. It's a bunch of people standing around screaming, "HEY! I'VE ALWAYS WANTED TO MAKE A GAME. SOMEONE GIVE ME MONEY TO DO IT."

People need to think a little bit harder about the whole Kickstarter process. Who exactly are you giving your money to? Can you trust them to make a good product? Are there any guarantees your contribution will be used as promised? Is every game tugging at your childhood memories really worth funding?

Kickstarter is an interesting idea, but there are a lot of unknowns that just seem to get glossed over.

#26 Edited by megalowho (978 posts) -

Pitching a game directly to consumers and seeing if they are willing to support it financially is an exciting development for sure, but it has to be an incredibly strong pitch to touch a wide audience and compel them to contribute multiples of what a retail copy might go for sight unseen. The list of dream games where I think "God, I'd totally pay X to see that happen" is very small, and I hope developers realize this and don't suddenly see Kickstarter as an easy meal ticket out of publisher hell or a way to get unfeasible ideas off the ground.

Honestly would love to play a new Tex Murphy game though, always have, and they have the track record/nostalgia card/credibility that many devs do not and zero chance of big publisher support for the series. Wish those guys the best.

#27 Posted by Three0neFive (2304 posts) -

The gaming community's recent fascination withy Kickstarter is adorable.

#28 Posted by Superfriend (1584 posts) -

A new Tex Murphy game sounds fucking awesome! I loved the crappy FMV stuff.

The great thing about Kickstarter is that it proves all those assholes who were talking about adventures being dead wrong. If anything the whole Doublefine kickstarter phenomenon has proven that there is room for more than just shooters and streamlined mainstream games. Of course the naysayers are always there (and in the boardrooms of Activision and EA).

I´m looking forward to the adventure game by Schafer. Let´s hope it won´t suck.

#29 Posted by tourgen (4542 posts) -

looks like it's totally working as intended to me.

If your game isn't interesting and people don't want a sequel .. well it won't get funded.

If you are a newcomer and don't have enough to show to give people confidence you will deliver something worth playing .. it won't get funded.

You still have to market your product.

You still have to make something worth playing.

Now you have another funding source other than self-funded, publisher, or panhandling.

#30 Posted by believer258 (12180 posts) -

Yeah - those no names are getting no money because they have no big names. Tim Shafer's getting money because he's got quite a name. It doesn't get him publisher's money, but it does get him the money of nostalgic people who really liked his work.

#31 Posted by jackopm (20 posts) -

I think there's been a misconception that Kickstarter means that anyone can get funding for any crazy game idea, and that's naive in the extreme. KS is a combination of patronage and glorified pre-orders, and if the product you're promising isn't interesting enough to elicit donations, you're screwed. I know that I personally browse KS a lot these days, and I've donated to a few projects and have plans to donate to a few more when I feel I can spend the money, but there have been several where I've watched the video and read the descriptions and thought "You know, this just doesn't seem worth my money." And I feel a little bad about it, because it's (presumably) these developers' hopes and dreams that I'm choosing not to support, but that mild pang of guilt isn't enough to separate me from $20, and I doubt it will separate many others.

Go take a look at the "Kick It Forward" campaign that Brian Fargo has started. It's a great idea, and I went through and looked at most of the projects that are involved (I'm sure more have joined up since I looked at it a few days ago). Unfortunately, not a single one made me think "Oh man, this seems worth my money!" They just seemed kinda... lame. And I know that's harsh, and I feel bad, but I'm not giving developers money purely out of charity.

As far as Auditorium goes, I want them to succeed, but as the original game (at least the iOS version) couldn't make me buy the full version, I kept my money in my wallet. Hopefully they'll succeed, but they'll have to do it without my $15.

#32 Posted by EmuLeader (558 posts) -

@nERVEcenter: I would say there was a bubble. As it said in the article, it got alot of people introduced to the site, sparking interest. Many people starting browsing the site and ended up funding projects they may never have even heard of if it wasn't for Double Fine fine bringing all those fans to the site. It may not be a new era of game funding or anything, but there was definitely a spike due to spillage from the Tim Schafer fund. Pixel Sand from the article is the prime example of this.

#33 Posted by Morningstar (2238 posts) -

The Banner Saga is doing great on kickstarter.

#34 Posted by AhmadMetallic (18954 posts) -

Why did you not mention TakeDown, Patrick?

#35 Posted by onan (1286 posts) -

I jumped in for $15 because of this article. Hopefully you get a mention in the Very Very Special Thanks section of the credits, Patrick.

#36 Posted by SeriouslyNow (8534 posts) -
@AlexW00d said:
To reiterate the point made in this article, something like Kickstarter was never gonna help the little guy who couldn't get a publishing deal/funding to make the game he wanted to make, and it was only ever going to help the big names who people already know and who could easily fund their own game or gain a publishing deal easily. Double Fine should donate all that extra money to all these kickstarters that actually need kickstarting.
Yeah, I agree but when I said that I was shouted down by people who complained that they didn't want their money going to other projects.  It's funny though because Brian Fargo agrees with us too. 
#37 Posted by I_smell (3925 posts) -
I made a Kickstarter last year! how come I don't get interviewed by Patrick Klepek >:|
 
Our goal looks tiny now, it's even smaller than that PIxel Sand game's goal. At the time though, we were just two regular dudes, and the only other Kickstarter was Cthulu Saves The World with a whopping $3,000 goal. When Alex (the other guy) set our goal as $7,000 I argued with him saying that was CRAZY and nobody would ever give us that much money. I thought it was massive and people would just laugh us off the internet.
 
Anyway now we're a company, and this Kickstarter stuff has blown up like crazy since we left.
#38 Edited by LordCmdrStryker (345 posts) -

Auditorium is boring and simple even by iOS game standards. I played the Flash version and was incredibly underwhelmed. On the other hand, since the Double Fine project I have also contributed to Idle Thumbs, FTL, Banner Saga, and Wasteland 2, all of which look far more interesting. Some guys got it, some don't.

@SeriouslyNow said:

@AlexW00d said:
To reiterate the point made in this article, something like Kickstarter was never gonna help the little guy who couldn't get a publishing deal/funding to make the game he wanted to make, and it was only ever going to help the big names who people already know and who could easily fund their own game or gain a publishing deal easily. Double Fine should donate all that extra money to all these kickstarters that actually need kickstarting.
Yeah, I agree but when I said that I was shouted down by people who complained that they didn't want their money going to other projects. It's funny though because Brian Fargo agrees with us too.

Brian Fargo wants to put back a percentage of the proceeds after the project is finished, not before.

#39 Posted by Cross (51 posts) -

I gave $15 to Auditorium, i suggest we help them reach their goal.

#40 Posted by Mumrik (1092 posts) -

You know, a lot of these project don't deserve funding. They're stupid and were left on the floor for a reason. Who'd ever want to fund something from the people who made TH: Ride? Or that Iran themed game?

They don't seem like good ideas OR ideas that would make money.

#41 Posted by amlabella (331 posts) -

Interesting article Patrick, kind of juxtaposes one I came up with recently that highlights some other successful projects from indie developers:

http://www.gamernode.com/kickstarter-a-videogame-success-story/

Just goes to show that even Kickstarter can be a risky proposition for game development. Still great to see some projects pulling through though.

#42 Posted by SeriouslyNow (8534 posts) -
@LordCmdrStryker said:

@SeriouslyNow said:

@AlexW00d said:
To reiterate the point made in this article, something like Kickstarter was never gonna help the little guy who couldn't get a publishing deal/funding to make the game he wanted to make, and it was only ever going to help the big names who people already know and who could easily fund their own game or gain a publishing deal easily. Double Fine should donate all that extra money to all these kickstarters that actually need kickstarting.
Yeah, I agree but when I said that I was shouted down by people who complained that they didn't want their money going to other projects. It's funny though because Brian Fargo agrees with us too.

Brian Fargo wants to put back a percentage of the proceeds after the project is finished, not before.

Who cares?  The money still goes to other projects which will need it and that can only be a good thing.
#43 Posted by BisonHero (7029 posts) -

@AhmadMetallic said:

Why did you not mention TakeDown, Patrick?

Yeah, it seems weird not to mention them. Maybe the TakeDown guys didn't return Patrick's emails because their story was exclusive to Kotaku or something.

#44 Posted by l3illyl3ob (285 posts) -

Apparently even more of a footnote is Takedown. It raised $100,000, but that's only half of its goal, and there's only 5 days to go. That project went wrong in a few ways. It didn't even start with a name, for the first 20 days, it was just "Crowdsourced Hardcore Tactical Shooter." We knew nothing about it other than the guys behind it really wanted to make something "hardcore." You got the sense that THEY knew nothing about it. Without a solid plan or presented idea for what you want your game to be, and without any well-known names behind the project, it was pretty much doomed to be unsuccessful from the start. If you aren't famous, you have to give us some very good reasons why we should back your project, otherwise it may never happen. ESPECIALLY if it's $200,000.

Looks like Auditorium 2 will be a late bloomer. I really hope it pulls through, I want that game to be really successful.

#45 Posted by joelalfaro (586 posts) -

I am now officially backing!

#46 Posted by RecSpec (3926 posts) -

I loved Auditorium, but had no idea this existed (their kickstarter)  until a couple days ago.

#47 Posted by ArbitraryWater (12105 posts) -

@AhmadMetallic said:

Why did you not mention TakeDown, Patrick?

Honestly this. It seems clear that they will probably not make their goal, though that's more from it being super vague and nebulous for most of its lifespan before they actually hunkered down and turned it into a pitch-able concept. Also they made a great video that accompanies that.

#48 Posted by gorkamorkaorka (446 posts) -

This is what a lot of you sound like "Only a couple kickstarters were successful therefore the entire system is worthless"

#49 Posted by Krystal_Sackful (810 posts) -

If you want to see a game Kick Starter that is destined for failure, check this out: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/120873716/your-world?ref=live

I am totally flabbergasted as to what this guy's expectations were.

#50 Posted by SeriouslyNow (8534 posts) -
@ArbitraryWater said:

@AhmadMetallic said:

Why did you not mention TakeDown, Patrick?

Honestly this. It seems clear that they will probably not make their goal, though that's more from it being super vague and nebulous for most of its lifespan before they actually hunkered down and turned it into a pitch-able concept. Also they made a great video that accompanies that.

It doesn't deserve positive attention.  The guy's not even giving copies away to any investors and he's even charging people to submit assets and a logo.  Fuck that.

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