Metro 2033's ending (spoilers)

#1 Posted by Geno (6477 posts) -

*****SPOILERS***** 
 
 
Okay, so I was wondering about Metro 2033's so called "good" ending, the one where you destroy the guidance system and let the Dark Ones live. This may be explained in the book (I haven't read it yet), but to someone that has only played the game how can this be considered the "good" ending? Throughout the game, you are attacked by mutants non-stop and early on in the game when you allow one of the Dark Ones to touch you (in a dream), you die. Nobody that you meet has anything good to say about the Dark Ones either. They are represented as nothing but evil. So why in the world would you take your only opportunity to eradicate them in the end, and after all that hard work, to save them instead? They say that they "just wish to understand us" and "just want peace"; but they have psychic powers, for all you know they're just playing mind tricks to help their survival. The game ends as if by your action of taking a pacifist stance you are creating an opportunity for peace between the Dark Ones and humans, but I simply see no incentive for the mutants to stop doing what they're doing at all. By kicking the guidance system off the tower I felt that Artyom basically doomed humanity, so I have trouble seeing how that is the "good" ending.    
 
Thoughts? 

#2 Posted by pwnasaurus (1286 posts) -

i think he did the right thing the dark ones can only communicate using brainwaves or something... it usually just fucks with people heads like severe headaches etc etc so people thought they are under attack. artyom was the only one that could really get their messages. i think it was the right ending and i look forward for 2034 and the film adaptation of 2033.

#3 Edited by Animasta (14693 posts) -

the thing is, the dark ones aren't the same as the mutants you're fighting. They're trying to get in contact with you through dreams, since that's the only way they can communicate. Of course, as far as I know, the book takes the bad ending so...
 
and the good ending is left undecided anyway, since I think the good ending is him taking the advice Khan gives you to heart (war breeds more war, never assume anything at first glance, etc.)

#4 Posted by Geno (6477 posts) -
@Laketown: But they look exactly like the mutants :/ 
#5 Posted by Animasta (14693 posts) -
@Geno said:
" @Laketown: But they look exactly like the mutants :/  "
they are mutants who are smart enough to try and reach out to him, however.
#6 Posted by Geno (6477 posts) -
@Laketown said:
" @Geno said:
" @Laketown: But they look exactly like the mutants :/  "
they are mutants who are smart enough to try and reach out to him, however. "
I guess, I just felt that it was a distinct possibility that the mutants could simply be lying when they say "we want peace". I mean, if someone pointed a gun to your head (or in this case a warhead at your home) wouldn't you be willing to say pretty much anything?  
 
I also felt that the game didn't make it clear even up till the end that they were remotely worth saving. In that psychic puzzle dream thing they had red auras and chased you, and one part forced you to shoot one. 
#7 Posted by Skald (4367 posts) -

I don't really know. I thought it was a great game, but I didn't really "get" the ending.

#8 Posted by Animasta (14693 posts) -
@Geno said:
" @Laketown said:
" @Geno said:
" @Laketown: But they look exactly like the mutants :/  "
they are mutants who are smart enough to try and reach out to him, however. "
I guess, I just felt that it was a distinct possibility that the mutants could simply be lying when they say "we want peace". I mean, if someone pointed a gun to your head (or in this case a warhead at your home) wouldn't you be willing to say pretty much anything?   I also felt that the game didn't make it clear even up till the end that they were remotely worth saving. In that psychic puzzle dream thing they had red auras and chased you, and one part forced you to shoot one.  "
I suppose, but I've just been playing through it again, and not all the dreams will have you killed if you run towards the dark ones.
 
It's not even that he's sure, in the good ending, it's just that he wants to give them a chance.
#9 Posted by The_Nubster (2155 posts) -
@Geno: It's not that either ending is good or bad, it's that both endings are different. In the mercy ending, you decide to give the Dark Ones a chance, because they show sentience and care. The mental damage that they do to those they try to contact is accidental, but they see something in Artyom and try to get to him. The reason you shoot the one following you is because Artyom thinks that they are trying to kill him. It's not until after he realizes that he may have made a mistake and spares them. 
 
In the war ending, if the player has shown a disinterest in exploration and understanding, you kill them and destroy them because all you know is they kill. Whether or not its on purpose doesn't matter; you just want to stop them.
#10 Posted by BadOrcLDR (178 posts) -

Not to get all philosophical on you, but a person who can forgive those who would harm them is inherently good. That being said, in reality some of those who are so quick to forgive are often taken advantage of. Nevertheless, it is worth that risk to maintain a sense of morality in the light of what you may become. For somebody who is morally opposed to killing unnecessarily, doing so, even to save his own people, would be far more torturous than death itself.  
 
Wait, this post is over six months old?  
 
Moral of the story: Doing what's Good is not always doing what should be done. 

#11 Posted by valrog (3671 posts) -

To tell you the truth, I thought I got the good ending, but as it turns out it was actually the bad one. So, what actually dictates what ending you get? I tried not shooting the Dark One at the end (If it's hostile, you kill it part), but that just resulted in my death...

#12 Posted by Garrison64 (4 posts) -

In my mind Artyom, being young, softspoken, and sheltered, connected more to the spiritual guide than the hardened warrior. I just couldn't see him being the type to just kill without understanding. The Dark Ones looked nothing like the mutants to me. They didn't seem to move to attack with agression. Instead it was more of a laying on of hands that resulted in some kind of cerebral overload for those contacted. The mutants on the other hand, moved like animals with ferocity and wildness. Then when the Dark Ones start speaking he realizes they are sentient and not just another animal acting on instinct. I love the way the whole decision comes down to that split second moment just after having to kill a Dark One in an apparent move of self defense. It was a great ending to the story and I'm glad I chose the one I did. It felt much more satisfying to me personally than having him start another war or wiping out another race of beings.
#13 Posted by sup909 (159 posts) -

THe "Good" ending is considered non-canon. In the books you kill them and the story follows on with Artyom's remorse. The dark ones are supposed to be the next evolution of humanity and are not really the enemy. The game doesn't do a great job of explaining this. The dark ones communicate with each other via telepathy, but if they do it to a normal human they destroy their mind. You see this at the very beginning of the game in the hospital or ward. Artyom for some reason can handle the visions, but can't really understand them.

#14 Posted by The_Laughing_Man (13629 posts) -
@sup909 said:

THe "Good" ending is considered non-canon. In the books you kill them and the story follows on with Artyom's remorse. The dark ones are supposed to be the next evolution of humanity and are not really the enemy. The game doesn't do a great job of explaining this. The dark ones communicate with each other via telepathy, but if they do it to a normal human they destroy their mind. You see this at the very beginning of the game in the hospital or ward. Artyom for some reason can handle the visions, but can't really understand them.

Artyom is guess is supposed to be closer to that point in evolution. 
#15 Edited by owl_of_minerva (1455 posts) -

Also, one of the themes of the book is that humanity doesn't deserve to survive: Earth is now post-human, and humanity is a dismal remainder living beneath the surface, clinging onto survival in the metro stations. The Dark Ones are an evolved form of humanity adapted to survival on the surface. As has been pointed out, the Dark Ones are not inherently evil, they are trying to communicate with the humans because they recognise kinship of some kind. One could argue that it is humanity that is evil - at least in the book. After destroying the world through nuclear warfare we haven't learnt the lesson of how to deal with conflict in a civilised fashion. Commies, Nazis, and capitalists (as well as many other small sects such as Satanists) murder each other despite being on the verge of extinction. To wipe out the Dark Ones, and thus end the prospect of humanity living on in a new form, is myopic because humanity has no future.

#16 Posted by warmonked (360 posts) -

@Geno said:

*****SPOILERS***** Okay, so I was wondering about Metro 2033's so called "good" ending, the one where you destroy the guidance system and let the Dark Ones live. This may be explained in the book (I haven't read it yet), but to someone that has only played the game how can this be considered the "good" ending? Throughout the game, you are attacked by mutants non-stop and early on in the game when you allow one of the Dark Ones to touch you (in a dream), you die. Nobody that you meet has anything good to say about the Dark Ones either. They are represented as nothing but evil. So why in the world would you take your only opportunity to eradicate them in the end, and after all that hard work, to save them instead? They say that they "just wish to understand us" and "just want peace"; but they have psychic powers, for all you know they're just playing mind tricks to help their survival. The game ends as if by your action of taking a pacifist stance you are creating an opportunity for peace between the Dark Ones and humans, but I simply see no incentive for the mutants to stop doing what they're doing at all. By kicking the guidance system off the tower I felt that Artyom basically doomed humanity, so I have trouble seeing how that is the "good" ending. Thoughts?

Yeah, this thread is a year old, but I just finished this game after getting from the THQ/Facebook promo and I need to post my thoughts SOMEWHERE. Basically, I totally agree with you. I have no idea what happens in the books, but strictly based on the game, the idea is F'n terrible. There's absolutely nothing to suggest the dark ones want peace. When every psychic encounter ends with you dying, or crawling on the floor, why the hell would anyone think to make peace?

Again, I have no idea if the book communicates this better, the game just has poor story telling, or the story is just terrible; but I didn't see any reason to stop pulling that revolver trigger in the last psychic sequence.

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