Monster Hunter Tri Did Not Give Me A Disease

Posted by Jeff (3580 posts) -
Stab these things! Then skin them for crafting supplies! 
You know, if you're the sort of person that has played a lot of Monster Hunter, there's really nothing I can tell you about the 20 minutes or so I spent with a demo of the North American version of the game that you don't already know from hearing about the Japanese version. But I can say that it didn't scar me up or kick me in the stomach or anything like that.

Earlier installments in the series, particularly the original PS2 version, were apparently known to scratch out the eyes of its North American players, most of which are still staring blankly at the online configuration screens and trying to piece them together in a way that makes sense to someone who, like, has actually used the Internet before. Around that time, Monster Hunter sort became a symbol around these parts for "man, online games developed in Japan feel like they were made by people who have never used the Internet before."

It sounds like Capcom's latest thrust, Monster Hunter Tri, might actually be up to modern standards. In fact, it might even surpass the modern Wii standard, since it doesn't rely on the regular Wii friend code system. You can name your characters and communicate with each other by name, or via a six-digit hunter ID that's, well, shorter than the regular Wii codes, at least. But the biggest point in Monster Hunter Tri's favor is that online play will be free here in North America, and the game will support the long-neglected WiiSpeak, too. So no paying a monthly fee for a four-player online game--which, if I may editorialize for a moment, has always been totally crazy--and you can talk to your friends while you do so. These two things might be enough to tip the scales for some of you. Like you, I've been wondering what the fuss is all about with the MH series. After seeing the lines for this game back at Tokyo Game Show a couple of years ago, it felt like I was missing out on something. Maybe we're all missing out on something.

Of course, my actual play time with the game didn't necessarily make me want to run right out and buy a Classic Controller Pro and, well, find my WiiSpeak. I went on a couple of hunting quests, and the action feels a little clunky, like, well, a PS2 game might have felt. Of course, this is the first time I've touched anything related to Monster Hunter in two years, so maybe I'm missing out? Or maybe I'm right in thinking that the game needs some form of lock-on targeting to prevent me from constantly missing the monsters I'm attempting to hunt.

Either way, it looks pretty solid for a Wii game and, sure enough, by the end of my time with the game, I was missing a lot less than I was at the beginning. But it left me wondering if Monster Hunter would ever properly catch on in North America, or if it's always going to be one of those "big in Japan" things that doesn't hit nearly as hard here in the States. For as clunky as some of it felt, I started to see the appeal of stalking prey around multiple areas and watching it closely for feedback about its health and other important status cues.

Capcom seems determined to do its part to educate the American audience. As of March 8, a retail demo disc will be released to GameStop locations to let people check out two single-player quests. The final game will be released on April 20, both on its own and as a bundle with the black Classic Controller Plus, which feels like a pretty well-designed piece of hardware from my time with it. It certainly feels better than the "non-Pro" edition, anyway.
Staff
#1 Posted by Jeff (3580 posts) -
Stab these things! Then skin them for crafting supplies! 
You know, if you're the sort of person that has played a lot of Monster Hunter, there's really nothing I can tell you about the 20 minutes or so I spent with a demo of the North American version of the game that you don't already know from hearing about the Japanese version. But I can say that it didn't scar me up or kick me in the stomach or anything like that.

Earlier installments in the series, particularly the original PS2 version, were apparently known to scratch out the eyes of its North American players, most of which are still staring blankly at the online configuration screens and trying to piece them together in a way that makes sense to someone who, like, has actually used the Internet before. Around that time, Monster Hunter sort became a symbol around these parts for "man, online games developed in Japan feel like they were made by people who have never used the Internet before."

It sounds like Capcom's latest thrust, Monster Hunter Tri, might actually be up to modern standards. In fact, it might even surpass the modern Wii standard, since it doesn't rely on the regular Wii friend code system. You can name your characters and communicate with each other by name, or via a six-digit hunter ID that's, well, shorter than the regular Wii codes, at least. But the biggest point in Monster Hunter Tri's favor is that online play will be free here in North America, and the game will support the long-neglected WiiSpeak, too. So no paying a monthly fee for a four-player online game--which, if I may editorialize for a moment, has always been totally crazy--and you can talk to your friends while you do so. These two things might be enough to tip the scales for some of you. Like you, I've been wondering what the fuss is all about with the MH series. After seeing the lines for this game back at Tokyo Game Show a couple of years ago, it felt like I was missing out on something. Maybe we're all missing out on something.

Of course, my actual play time with the game didn't necessarily make me want to run right out and buy a Classic Controller Pro and, well, find my WiiSpeak. I went on a couple of hunting quests, and the action feels a little clunky, like, well, a PS2 game might have felt. Of course, this is the first time I've touched anything related to Monster Hunter in two years, so maybe I'm missing out? Or maybe I'm right in thinking that the game needs some form of lock-on targeting to prevent me from constantly missing the monsters I'm attempting to hunt.

Either way, it looks pretty solid for a Wii game and, sure enough, by the end of my time with the game, I was missing a lot less than I was at the beginning. But it left me wondering if Monster Hunter would ever properly catch on in North America, or if it's always going to be one of those "big in Japan" things that doesn't hit nearly as hard here in the States. For as clunky as some of it felt, I started to see the appeal of stalking prey around multiple areas and watching it closely for feedback about its health and other important status cues.

Capcom seems determined to do its part to educate the American audience. As of March 8, a retail demo disc will be released to GameStop locations to let people check out two single-player quests. The final game will be released on April 20, both on its own and as a bundle with the black Classic Controller Plus, which feels like a pretty well-designed piece of hardware from my time with it. It certainly feels better than the "non-Pro" edition, anyway.
Staff
#2 Posted by Driadon (2998 posts) -

The problem with a lock on, even though it would help the camera issues A LOT, is that 90% of Monster Hunter is about attacking very very precise spots on enemies and a lock on would making hitting those spots incredibly difficult. So, yes, camera would be fixed, but everything else would be much much harder.

#3 Posted by Fripplebubby (1027 posts) -

Something is finally using Wiispeak? That's too bad, mine was still mint in box (for collecting, ya' know).

#4 Posted by ArbitraryWater (11791 posts) -

I like how tentative the tone of this article is, like Jeff was going to completely write it off, but instead thought it was ok.

#5 Posted by Chris2KLee (2336 posts) -
@Driadon said:
" The problem with a lock on, even though it would help the camera issues A LOT, is that 90% of Monster Hunter is about attacking very very precise spots on enemies and a lock on would making hitting those spots incredibly difficult. So, yes, camera would be fixed, but everything else would be much much harder. "
I think a general camera lock that keeps the monster mostly in the center of the screen would be good. You wouldn't be locked to a target, but it would always generally be in your view, and you attack from there. Or at least a center camera option that always realigns to the monster you choose.
#6 Edited by Driadon (2998 posts) -
@Chris2KLee said:

" @Driadon said:

" The problem with a lock on, even though it would help the camera issues A LOT, is that 90% of Monster Hunter is about attacking very very precise spots on enemies and a lock on would making hitting those spots incredibly difficult. So, yes, camera would be fixed, but everything else would be much much harder. "
I think a general camera lock that keeps the monster mostly in the center of the screen would be good. You wouldn't be locked to a target, but it would always generally be in your view, and you attack from there. Or at least a center camera option that always realigns to the monster you choose. "
It would have to be a very loose lock on in that sense, but I do see your point.
#7 Edited by Claude (16254 posts) -

"For a Wii game" 
 
I hate that phrase.
#8 Posted by Yzzerdd (521 posts) -

 Demon's' Souls Supremacy

#9 Posted by animateria (3253 posts) -

As a person who enjoys the PSP version (Monster Hunter Freedom Unite), the camera is a total non-issue. 
 
Having a fixed camera view would totally mess up the game actually. Most monsters are big enough for you to either roll or run underneath them. When you want to cut the tail or aim for the claws, legs or head, fixed camera aiming would make it hard. Not to mention making the shooting in the game too easy.
 
The only thing that the left hand pretty much uses is the thumb and the index finger. The thumb for the analog stick (movement) and the index finger for the d-pad (camera). I think the game would suffer from traditional Wii controls because this is impossible, the classic controller is almost a requirement.
 
Anyways, I wonder what weapon Jeff was using?

 
Every weapon has an extreme pro an con, most heavy weapons being great damage dealers but clunky to use, while the lighter ones deal very little damage but are easy to deal with. I'm still miffed at how people use ranged weapons in a solo run (But damn they make it look easy). 

   Monster Hunter may look like any other hack in slash game, but the player needs to have a different mindset. You don't rush an attack and expect to come away unscathed , most of the time you circle around a monster looking for an opening after they attack. I spend a lot more time avoiding direct confrontation than actually going after the monster. Look up any hunting guide on Youtube and most videos don't teach you how to attack, but how to avoid attacks.

#10 Posted by Jeff (3580 posts) -
@animateria: I used the (a?) long sword and the weapon that transforms from axe to sword and back again.
Staff
#11 Posted by Milkman (16838 posts) -

Monster Hunter is for crazies. There, I said it.

#12 Posted by animateria (3253 posts) -
@Jeff said:
" @animateria: I used the (a?) long sword and the weapon that transforms from axe to sword and back again. "
The long sword is fairly easy to use for a big weapon. Mostly focusing on getting some slashes in then using the back slash or side slash to move away from the monsters. It's a good middle ground between the heavier and lighter weapons. (Incidentally the lightest weapon I ever use, I hate the small weapons)
 
I don't know much about the Slash Axe (sword axe thing) but that thing looks like it takes a bit getting used to. From what I've seen of Japanese players on Youtube, they generally play with the longer option, and rarely in the shorter mode, and use that weird charge thing. I rarely see people use it so I'm guessing it's not that popular.
#13 Edited by Death_Burnout (3797 posts) -

Sometimes i feel like im the sole person who bought Freedom Unite for the PSP in the UK, i know im not, but boy do i feel it. They really screwed up the ad campaign here for that i feel, i don't think the Ad told people enough about "why" it "has taken japan by storm" which is what the narrator said. Didn't show anything.

#14 Posted by animateria (3253 posts) -
@Death_Burnout said:
" Sometimes i feel like im the sole person who bought Freedom Unite for the PSP in the UK, i know im not, but boy do i feel it. They really screwed up the ad campaign here for that i feel, i don't think the Ad told people enough about "why" it "has taken japan by storm" which is what the narrator said. Didn't show anything. "
It was popular enough for Capcom to open a Gathering Hall in the UK for two months as a promo.
 
It's been closed, but damn I wish there was a Gathering Hall in Southern California for once.
#15 Edited by Linkyshinks (9880 posts) -
@animateria said:

" @Death_Burnout said:

" Sometimes i feel like im the sole person who bought Freedom Unite for the PSP in the UK, i know im not, but boy do i feel it. They really screwed up the ad campaign here for that i feel, i don't think the Ad told people enough about "why" it "has taken japan by storm" which is what the narrator said. Didn't show anything. "

It was popular enough for Capcom to open a Gathering Hall in the UK for two months as a promo. It's been closed, but damn I wish there was a Gathering Hall in Southern California for once. "
 
 
A post of mine from the franchise forum: 
 
Went yesterday with a few friends, went in after a little smoke to be precise, only to liven things up a little if it was crap.They've got really comfy beanbags and sofa's in there. I had a great time, it was actually pretty fun in 4 player, lots of reasons to get loud an curse your friends or monsters. The Monster Hunter 3 demo was far cooler tho.
 


#16 Posted by Death_Burnout (3797 posts) -
@animateria said:
" @Death_Burnout said:
" Sometimes i feel like im the sole person who bought Freedom Unite for the PSP in the UK, i know im not, but boy do i feel it. They really screwed up the ad campaign here for that i feel, i don't think the Ad told people enough about "why" it "has taken japan by storm" which is what the narrator said. Didn't show anything. "
It was popular enough for Capcom to open a Gathering Hall in the UK for two months as a promo. It's been closed, but damn I wish there was a Gathering Hall in Southern California for once. "
For the record, i am fully aware about the gathering hall, in fact, i was reading about it on the official forums on the week it was released...thats why i said i know im not alone, i certainly am in my part of the country.
#17 Posted by Linkyshinks (9880 posts) -

I'm keen, I just need to know if Capcom are going to be charging Europeans.

#18 Posted by Chris2KLee (2336 posts) -
@Driadon said:
" @Chris2KLee said:

" @Driadon said:

" The problem with a lock on, even though it would help the camera issues A LOT, is that 90% of Monster Hunter is about attacking very very precise spots on enemies and a lock on would making hitting those spots incredibly difficult. So, yes, camera would be fixed, but everything else would be much much harder. "
I think a general camera lock that keeps the monster mostly in the center of the screen would be good. You wouldn't be locked to a target, but it would always generally be in your view, and you attack from there. Or at least a center camera option that always realigns to the monster you choose. "
It would have to be a very loose lock on in that sense, but I do see your point. "
Yep, I want enough freedom to still be able to break parts off. On this Wii version it might be less of an issue, since you do have 2 analog sticks. I'm thinking more about the recently rumored Monster Hunter 3 for PSP, which I'm praying has some sort of camera lock.
#19 Posted by Meowayne (6084 posts) -

Zangeki no Reginleiv has lock-on, yet you're still able to very precisely target specific body parts. How? MOTIONPLUS SUPPORT.

#20 Posted by DRE7777 (398 posts) -

It sounds to me like a bigger problem with this Monster Hunter game is that its only coming out on the Wii which doesn't do online bad, it does it terribly. Especially in a game where a big aspect is playing online with friends. Sometimes I really dont understand why companies decide to make a game on the Wii, the worst system when it comes to third party support and sales. Another game that comes to mind, NBA Jam. Why the hell are they making that for the Wii, seriously? Sorry, but all this Nintendo news is really bumming me out/pissing me off.

#21 Posted by JackSukeru (5915 posts) -
@Driadon said:
" The problem with a lock on, even though it would help the camera issues A LOT, is that 90% of Monster Hunter is about attacking very very precise spots on enemies and a lock on would making hitting those spots incredibly difficult. So, yes, camera would be fixed, but everything else would be much much harder. "
From my experience of Monster Hunter, which extends to having played 120 hours of the PsP version, I don't see how they couldn't just implement a lock on feature with several lock-on points like some of the bosses in demon's Souls had. This would allow people to lock on to different specific parts of a monster while maybe not missing the actual monster so much trying to his these specific points. 
 
As for this game, if the online is free in europe too, then I'll be picking it up. Also let's all have a moment of silence for the Gun Lance, granted I used mainly a long sword, but man what a cool weapon that was.
#22 Posted by buckybit (1455 posts) -

Now I know more about Monster Hunter than I ever wanted. Thx Jeff + 20 Duders. 
 
As to the question: "How to make it as popular in the States", I'd say, Capcom buy a Microsoft Halo license just to be able to put it on the retail box (I know it's a Wii game). Hire a kid, that explains that all Monster Hunter content is somehow connected to Master Chiefs quest for his Halo 4 (!!!) suit - and let the idiots flood the stores and buy it. I know, it sounds evil. But that's how video game marketing works, right?

#23 Posted by ChrisTaran (1621 posts) -

Can't wait until this fails again! :D

#24 Posted by Darth_Cuddles (25 posts) -
@Claude said:
"
"For a Wii game" 
 I hate that phrase. "
agreed the Wii has some awesome titles, Mario galaxy, No More Heroes, NSMBW, etc and Hopefully Silent Hill Shattered memories, No more heroes 2 and this    
#25 Posted by Bollard (5598 posts) -

Two things: Yes Jeff you have been missing out; and lock on is a no - it really isn't that hard once you've put a few hours into the game, the control scheme becomes natural eventually and lock on just wouldn't work at all. Still, this is the game that might persuade me to buy a Wii...

#26 Posted by KevinahKun (13 posts) -

Man do I love Monster Hunter. When me and my 3 other buddy's group up to kick some Monster ass we have a great time. i guess I picked up a lot of information from these guys who had played it a bit longer and realized that I shouldn't drink health potions while near the monster and that rolling is your best friend(aside from your fellow hunters). I learned to combo moves and to read the body language of many kinds of beast's and how to avoid their attacks. I learned the strategy's of not only monsters but of my weapons. I learned that attacking parts of monsters are vital to get better loot and to weaken the beast's, which is why a Lock On system would break this game, or just make it easy.I guess this game takes a bit to get used to but once you do, well lets just say your into a 150+ hour joy ride of fun and amusement. The thing that does make me angry is all of the moron's who come out and say this game is trash and has bad controls when they are still stuck in the I'M GOING TO RUN UP AND HIT THIS MONSTER mentality when they should be in a more thinking mentality. Just saying, if your not use to it, don't think it is trash. Man, I'm 14 and  I have wrotten up a essay on why Monster Hunter is great but I can't write a Essay on Abraham Lincoln.

#27 Posted by SuperSecretAgenda (696 posts) -

From my experience, Monster Hunter is like a fighting game...
 
...Where both players are trying to cheat as much as possible to win.
 
'I stay at a distance and use my bowgun'
 
'...Oh screw you! I don't have any ranged attacks!'
 
'I know.'

#28 Posted by Damodar (1402 posts) -
@Darth_Cuddles said:
" @Claude said:
"
"For a Wii game" 
 I hate that phrase. "
agreed the Wii has some awesome titles, Mario galaxy, No More Heroes, NSMBW, etc and Hopefully Silent Hill Shattered memories, No more heroes 2 and this     "
It's somewhat necessary when you are talking about graphics though. Or at least implied.
#29 Posted by floodiastus (1262 posts) -

It is NOT ok to release a game with untight controls if it focuses heavily on action and you should not be forced to buy a new controller to play it as it should be played imho

#30 Edited by Al3xand3r (7574 posts) -
@floodiastus  said:

" It is NOT ok to release a game with untight controls if it focuses heavily on action and you should not be forced to buy a new controller to play it as it should be played imho "

Good thing CAPCOM didn't do that then! Everybody wins! Tri has great, tight controls, and the controller is up to personal habits, the game plays absolutely fine with both CC and the standard default Wii controllers. In fact, even though I played MH a ton on PSP, and I have a CC for Wii, I don't bother hooking it up for Tri. It's much more intuitive than on PSP and has certain convenient shortcuts. Not that I agree with you on the controller issue, fighting games like SFIV are best played with an arcade stick so I guess they shouldn't have released such games since arcade sticks aren't bundled with all systems eh? Not.
#31 Posted by Meowayne (6084 posts) -
@Al3xand3r said:
Tri has great, tight controls"
No. Better than previous games =/= "great and tight".
#32 Edited by Al3xand3r (7574 posts) -
@Meowayne said:

" @Al3xand3r said:

Tri has great, tight controls"

No. Better than previous games =/= "great and tight". "
I know that better than previous games doesn't mean great and tight, I understand basic English decently enough. Good thing MH has always been great and tight, and so better than great and tight is still great and tight. You don't like it, that's fine by me, but that doesn't make anything about it bad, or not tight. The controls are expertly crafted, the game is unique in many ways so plenty people may not bother getting into it all that much as it requires different methods than most action games, so many expect some things to work differently, but almost everything about it has been carefully considered, works as it should, and builds the game into an awesome, unique experience that's unlike pretty much anything else out there, despite very superficial similarities to other games. With a little patience and methodical pacing you down giants 10 times your size, with a fight that seems as epic and exhausting as it should. I understand many gamers don't have that patience and would rather hammer (or hold down) an attack button and potion hotkey button (hence Diablo's popularity, I like it too even) as they prefer instant gratification from their games, but that's not the game's fault. There are plenty games that provide that and you can go play, leave MH for those who want it like me, but know you're not fit to judge it harshly just because it doesn't cater to you specifically. Just move on and play other games.
#33 Edited by floodiastus (1262 posts) -
@Al3xand3r said:

" @floodiastus  said:

" It is NOT ok to release a game with untight controls if it focuses heavily on action and you should not be forced to buy a new controller to play it as it should be played imho "

Good thing CAPCOM didn't do that then! Everybody wins! Tri has great, tight controls, and the controller is up to personal habits, the game plays absolutely fine with both CC and the standard default Wii controllers. In fact, even though I played MH a ton on PSP, and I have a CC for Wii, I don't bother hooking it up for Tri. It's much more intuitive than on PSP and has certain convenient shortcuts. Not that I agree with you on the controller issue, fighting games like SFIV are best played with an arcade stick so I guess they shouldn't have released such games since arcade sticks aren't bundled with all systems eh? Not. "
I thought the controls on PSP made it unplayable actually, felt very much like PS1 -gen controls, non responsive, laggy and without any sort of lock-on.  
 
I think street fighter is best played on a gamepad, it's hard as hell using a stick so I don't agree with YOU there. But everyone keeps saying you should have a "pro" controller for MH, which kinda sucks if you don't have it.
#34 Edited by Al3xand3r (7574 posts) -

You think wrong, and "everyone" (how's that possible, am I not part of everyone, yet I just said you don't need one?) who says you "should" have a CCPro controller also thinks wrong. The game works perfectly well with remote+nunchuck. Simple. Not having lock on isn't a "dated" concept, it's a design choice that works perfectly well. Lock on cameras did exist in the 32/64bit days, you know, and MH was first introduced a gen after that even. And there's no "lag", your dude starts doing the action the moment you press a button, the action itself is what may take some time to complete, depending on the action, which again is a design choice. Just like Mario doesn't instantly stop if you let go of the d-pad while sprinting, meaning you have to be more careful with how you move in ledges, in MH you have to learn the timing of the attacks and moves and do them when appropriate as opposed to just hammering attacks as in more casual action titles. It's a different game and one unlike most people have played before so there's an adjustment period before you understand that it works as it should.

#35 Posted by ryanwho (12082 posts) -

You can't say lockon would break the game because you need precise body shot attacks, then defend the giant incredibly slow sword most people use in the game. And, not to state the obvious, but why not have a lock on where you target specific body parts for large creatures and not the collective whole? Turn based games have an easy enough time with it. Have a lock on button and when you hold it and press left-right you change targets and when you press up down you change where on your target you're targeting. Even the big monsters are only made of like 4 different parts. Bam, problem solved.

#36 Edited by Al3xand3r (7574 posts) -

It's a design choice that provides the excellent gameplay it does alongside all other design choices. What does the lock on have to do with the great sword in particular? Slow or fast weapons can be aimed the same, you just need to anticipate the monster's movements and start the attack at the right time to hit the right part. For example, if a monster tends to face you to attack, and it has various rush attacks, what you can do is dodge the rush attack so it runs past you, quickly get behind it and ready your great sword's charge attack so that it hits the monster in the head when it turns around to face you and attack again. That will make it stagger which gives you time to get out of the way before it attacks again. Simple. It just takes a bit of patience.

After you learn the timings further you will even be able to time your charge attack to hit the monster as it rushes you, stopping it in its tracks.

It's not just your weapons that may be slow, the monster attacks have certain timing as well, so you basically use that to your advantage. You learn their attacks and behaviour, learn your attacks and their effect, and exploit both. It's not a hard concept to grasp, even if in practice it takes a bit of, eh, practice.

A lock on camera alone wouldn't help matters, they'd have to change the gameplay accordingly to give you Zelda-like strafing abilities, because if your camera moved around automatically the current character control would mess you up, taking you in a different direction every time the camera changed, and with how monsters move, it would change a lot. Then they'd have to adjust the monster AI and movements similarly, since if you can lock on some of them should too, and in the end make it a different game. You can always play Zelda instead of want MH to change into it.

Since when do people have trouble controlling cameras manually anyway, don't you do it in all FPS games, even if they have a bit of auto aim on your consoles? It's not even as hard in MH since you have a much wider field of view as it's third person, so you can keep the monster in view pretty easily. You don't have to keep it perfectly centered or anything of the sort. As long as you can see it, you can dodge its attacks and unleash your own effectively.

#37 Edited by ryanwho (12082 posts) -

Its only a big problem during fights where there are like a bunch of enemies. You can't cut your combos short or quickly change direction mid combo and in a game with multiple enemies that can be infuriating, especially with a slow weapon. A lot of aspects then come into play where you see this is a game clearly not built with multiple enemy combat in mind yet you're doing it often. Its all pointless observations, I understand. The game is majorly popular and they're never going to add lockon or make the game streamlined in any way for fear of losing that inexplicable appeal they have right now. Just look at Pokemon for a glimpse of MH's future. It is what it is, and I personally got more out of FF12's mark hunts which act essentially just like Monster Hunter than I did from MH2. So basically I like the concept, not a fan of the execution. So idunno. I'll just hope someone copies MH and makes the gameplay more in line with what I want, and let dudes who dig MH do their thing.

#38 Posted by hinderk (685 posts) -
@Al3xand3r: Just curious to what you and other MH fans would think a loose Lock-on. Instead of pointing your character towards  the monster, it would just point the camera towards the monster you wanted to fight so you wouldn't have to manual do it yourself. The gameplay wouldn't have to change, and it might make it easier for necomers that way.
#39 Edited by Al3xand3r (7574 posts) -

If your camera moved around automatically the current character control would mess you up, taking you in a different direction every time the camera changed, and with how monsters move, it would change a lot. When you control it manually you instictively know how to change your character's control to do exactly what you want (like in an FPS you can be aiming at some dude in front of you while you keep retreating, changing your analog's direction as you change your view to aim at the guy, but still going in the same retreating direction), if it's automatic you can't do that as well.

And if it's "loose" what does that mean, slow to respond so that your controls wouldn't mess up? Then maybe it will be worse off than manual control depending on the monster or when you need to fight more than 1 boss at a time, which doesn't mean you want to target just one so you can have a lock on switch button, you often want to see both, ie, attack one but also see what the other is doing, if it's getting ready to rush you or do a ranged attack or whatever.

So, like I said, I don't think lock on would help newcomers without changing more gameplay elements to suit that change. Having just played a bit of MHTri, I think if a newcomer can't get into the game with that, he never will and should just move on to other games. The single player campaign is the best tutorial yet for the franchise, miles beyond the PSP games' efforts.

There are streamlined clones like God Eater coming if you want something similar without the patience and practice needed.

As for fights against multiple enemies, you can usually still take them on one by one, or even ignore the bulk of them to focus on the one you want, you just need to dodge a little more. It's not that big of a problem usually, since small enemies also tend to have weak attacks that don't affect you very much, like throw you down and give the boss time to attack you or something.

There are always weapons and moves that cover a wide area too, like the sideways slashes of the long and great swords, the new sideways attack of the lance, so you can dispatch a few weaklings easy to then focus on the big one or whatever. Some may also be scared of fire so you can hit them with a torch a few times for them to retreat, or throw a dung bomb on a boss to make it leave an area infested with minions and go elsewhere to continue the fight, you have lots of tools to help you. Bosses tend to be just one or later on two at once, and maybe not even in the same exact area. But again you treat it as 1 on 1, while taking care to avoid the other's attacks as well, rather than try to attack both at the same time. It's best to defeat one as quickly as possible and then have an easier time with the second after all, instead of alternate attacks between them.

#40 Posted by hinderk (685 posts) -
@Al3xand3r:Cool, I just curious if something like that would work for fans of MH.

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