Looking towards Skyrim. Building a PC, one step at a time.

#1 Posted by sfighter21 (833 posts) -

So, In anticipation for Skyrim, I am starting to think about building a PC.  Now, I'm not that tech savvy, but I have been trying to do some research.  From past observation, I have noticed that the GB community is pretty well versed in the building of PCs.  I was thinking it would be cheaper to build a rig rather than buy one (e.g. Alienware, etc.).  Is this true?  And if so, where should I start my investment into this project?  Understand that I am starting from scratch.  I do not currently own a PC that I wish to upgrade.  I want to build one, mainly for gaming, obviously.  My laptop is good for everything else, lol.  I know there aren't any specs for Skyrim yet, this is mainly for the purpose of building a gaming PC; Skyrim just helped nudge me along, haha.  Any insight, help, advice of any kind would be GREATLY appreciated!!  Thanks Duders!

#2 Posted by project343 (2873 posts) -

While I can't really offer much in-depth help, I've come to learn that RAM is a key factor in open world experiences (be in massively multiplayer, or simply another Bethesda game). Shooting for 8+ gigs of RAM should be a priority if you plan to run Skyrim.

#3 Posted by AhmadMetallic (19303 posts) -
@sfighter21:  Firstly, Skyrim is a console game. I think you'd have a better experience with the PS3 version rather than the console port on the PC
 
And to answer your questions: Yes, building your PC on your own is much cheaper than buying a pre-build. And you should approach this project based on your budget --> how much money are you willing to spend? It's all about your budget.
#4 Posted by SomeJerk (3598 posts) -

Maximize your RAM and consider it future proofing, DDR4 RAM will be introduced on consumer level in small scale 2014 to be rolled out and start becoming prevalent 2015.

Buy an SSD for game storage while at it. Loads of RAM and a healthy fast storage drive for any game = flawless experience. Even Morrowind on the most powerful modern machine will have loading screens and pause-bars until it gets put on an SSD, then it's smooth sailing with the tiniest of hiccups.

As for graphics cards - pick up a cheap one now or wait. September-October just might drop some nice new AMD Radeons and price-cuts from both AMD and Nvidia.

#5 Posted by Unchained (1091 posts) -

If you happen to live in Canada or the US, I'd highly recommend ncix.com. They let you choose your components and they do the assembly and testing for a small fee.

Building a rig on your own is very rewarding, but it can be incredibly frustrating as well. Especially if you aren't well versed in components and compatibility issues, etc. A good place to do some research is tomshardware.com and Anandtech.com.

Myself, I'd go with:

  • Pick a case of your choosing, just do some research to ensure there aren't any known overheating or noise issues.
  • a Sandy Bridge LGA 1155 motherboard.
  • an i5 2500k processor
  • a good cooler
  • 8 to 12gb ram
  • gtx 580
  • an 750w power supply
  • an ssd for my os and enough room to add a select few games or other apps
  • a 2TB storage drive
  • a standard dvd drive for my optical reader.
  • I think I covered all the core components.

Good luck.

#6 Edited by iBePeRFeCT (397 posts) -

I built my first gaming PC this year as well.  I found this thread to be very useful. It most likely will answer everyone of your questions.

#7 Posted by Skytylz (4070 posts) -

There is a shellshocker for 16 gb of ddr3 1600 for $120 at the Egg today.   
 
It is way cheaper to build than buy a prebuilt and it's a ton of fun!  It makes gaming on it way sweeter when you know you built it!  Just do your research, pick out some parts, and then post them back here and lots of users will be able to tell you if they'll work.  I'd recommend when you do start buying parts, do it over like a month and just watch for deals on the parts you've picked out, or even narrow each component down to a few options and watch for deals.  I saved probably $200 doing this.  If your in the U.S. I'd just check Hardforum's hotdeals section everyday and ebay for some parts.

#8 Posted by MrKlorox (11142 posts) -

I recommend going to a custom build site (such as ibuypower.com or similar) and "blueprinting" a rig (set a budget for yourself and pick out the parts that fit into it) then using Google to find the best prices for the individual parts instead of buying a pre-built rig through them. This way it's cheaper and you have a bit of a guide letting you know what the current parts are and what they cost, as well as the privalege of shopping around. Be sure and keep shipping costs in mind since those can really add up when buying stuff from a bunch of different stores.

And you ABSOLUTELY DEFINITELY want to buy Skyrim on PC for the sake of user created content and mods. If you still wanna use a controller, that's probably going to be an option.

#9 Posted by AhmadMetallic (19303 posts) -

Why is everyone talking about RAM? The guy is building from scratch

#10 Posted by Skytylz (4070 posts) -
@Ahmad_Metallic: Becuase Ram looks cool.  
#11 Posted by Unchained (1091 posts) -

I'm going to wait it out until the system requirements are posted for Skyrim before I go frothy for a new rig. I'm thinking my current machine will have no trouble maxing out anything Skyrim can throw at it. I wasn't even thinking about upgrading until the fan interview:

The PC version also gets higher res textures, larger render modes, and a bunch of other effects you can scale up if your machine is a beast.

Now...I have the upgrade itch and I think I may scratch it.

#12 Posted by ShiftyMagician (2162 posts) -

I'm going to take a calculated bet that it won't be as intensive as Battlefield 3 on the PC, so having the equivalent of an intel i7, 4-8GB ram (depends on how well they optimise the game) and a graphics card similar to perhaps the Nvidia  560 GTX Ti will do quite fine.  Go more or less depending on your spending budget.

#13 Posted by SlasherMan (1723 posts) -
@Ahmad_Metallic said:
@sfighter21:  Firstly, Skyrim is a console game. I think you'd have a better experience with the PS3 version rather than the console port on the PC
How is it any different than Oblivion or Fallout, when both were console ports as well (or even most other multiplatform games for that matter)?
The PC version will look better, run better, give you the option to use your preferred input method and, of course, mods.
#14 Posted by canucks23 (1079 posts) -
@project343 said:
While I can't really offer much in-depth help, I've come to learn that RAM is a key factor in open world experiences (be in massively multiplayer, or simply another Bethesda game). Shooting for 8+ gigs of RAM should be a priority if you plan to run Skyrim.
Not really... 4 gigs of ram is usually plenty in a decent gaming rig. Depends on how much this guy is looking to spend.
#15 Posted by AhmadMetallic (19303 posts) -
@SlasherMan said:
@Ahmad_Metallic said:
@sfighter21:  Firstly, Skyrim is a console game. I think you'd have a better experience with the PS3 version rather than the console port on the PC
How is it any different than Oblivion or Fallout, when both were console ports as well (or even most other multiplatform games for that matter)? The PC version will look better, run better, give you the option to use your preferred input method and, of course, mods.
Wait, Oblivion was a console port? then why was "Skyrim's lead platform is consoles" considered news ? i've seen several threads and articles about it a while back
#16 Posted by SlasherMan (1723 posts) -
@canucks23 said:
@project343 said:
While I can't really offer much in-depth help, I've come to learn that RAM is a key factor in open world experiences (be in massively multiplayer, or simply another Bethesda game). Shooting for 8+ gigs of RAM should be a priority if you plan to run Skyrim.
Not really... 4 gigs of ram is usually plenty in a decent gaming rig. Depends on how much this guy is looking to spend.
Also this. What is with everyone recommending crazy amounts of RAM? It's just like the people who recommend 1000W PSUs for every build.
#17 Posted by warxsnake (2720 posts) -

The PC Tested build for Gerstmann is still, in my opinion, the perfect balance. Through the years of PC building, it's never beneficial to go all out and get the best of everything, unless you're a rich kid like Shia Labeouf of course, and money is not an issue.

Mid-to-High parts are always the best to get, and in this case:

Core i5 2500(k)

8GB Ram

GTX570

And you get hardware around that to accommodate. Once you get and build your PC, its ridiculously easy these days to just swap parts in later on.

Skyrim is a multiplatform game with ~maybe~ a DX11 variant, most probably not, but anyway, it means that it's just another game that falls into the same spec requirements that most multiplatform games have fallen into for years now. It also depends on the engine and optimization, but anyway, the hardware above will handle the game easily. There is no way Skyrim will magically require anywhere near those specs or anything more, especially since its an open world game that will have to be optimized to hell to just work on the PS3.

Beyond this, its up to you and how more refined you want your PC to be.

You want better sound? Don't use onboard, get a soundcard like the HTOmega Claro Halo (Dolby Headphone, Dolby Digital Live) and Astro A40 with Mixamp (DH DDL).

You want a unique visual experience? Get a Mid-High Nvidia card like the GTX570 and a 3D 1080p monitor like the Planar SA2311W

You want added immersion? Get a TrackIR 5 head tracking device for racing games and flight sims

You want to experience "games that were made for console" but on your PC where they end up being exponentially better? Get an Xbox Controller for PC so that you get all the options you want, and then some.

But yeah, for the more technical aspect, refer to the tested Gerstmann PC build. And also, a good trick is to go to newegg.com, add just the CPU to your cart (core i5 2500) and it will give you a bundle with everything in it. DO NOT BUY the bundle as there are always weird decisions and shitty hardware picks in them, but they are a pretty decent guide as to what you need to get along with any given part.

Here are my opinions, these will differ from other people chiming in of course:

  • Best CPU to get: Core i5 2500 (LGA 1155) or higher
  • Best Motherboard to get: Compliant with your CPU, in this case: ASUS P8Z68-V (LGA 1155)
  • Best Ram to get: GSKILL 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 1600
  • Best Video Card to get: EVGA GTX570 Superclocked
  • Best Audio Card to get: HT Omega Claro Halo
  • Best Headphones to get: Astro Mixamp (Coax or Optical connection to soundcard) + any high quality headphone set (Astro A40, Sennheiser HDxxx...)
  • Best Hard Drive to get: Up to you if you want to go SSD or traditional hard drive for your operation system, for storage though, Western Digital Caviar Black 2TB
  • Best Gamepad to get: Xbox 360 controller (either wired to USB, or Wireless controller + Receiver)
  • Best PC peripherals to get: TrackIR 5 for head tracking, X52 Pro for joystick and throttle, G13 for gaming keyboard
  • Best Keyboard to get: Microsoft X4
  • Best Mouse to get: Logitech G500
  • Best Monitor(s) to get: Planar SA2311W 120Hz 3D w/ Nvidia 3D kit
  • Best Power Supply to get: Seasonic gold series 750W or higher
  • Best aftermarket cooler for CPU: Corsair H60
  • Best case to get: Fractal Design R3 XL
  • Best Mousepad to get: Steelseries 9HD
#18 Posted by SlasherMan (1723 posts) -
@Ahmad_Metallic said:
@SlasherMan said:
@Ahmad_Metallic said:
@sfighter21:  Firstly, Skyrim is a console game. I think you'd have a better experience with the PS3 version rather than the console port on the PC
How is it any different than Oblivion or Fallout, when both were console ports as well (or even most other multiplatform games for that matter)? The PC version will look better, run better, give you the option to use your preferred input method and, of course, mods.
Wait, Oblivion was a console port? then why was "Skyrim's lead platform is consoles" considered news ? i've seen several threads and articles about it a while back
Because people tend to forget fairly quickly. And it's the internet, people need something to bitch and moan about, otherwise they won't have anything to do with their lives.
#19 Posted by project343 (2873 posts) -
@canucks23: I mostly suggest 8gigs of RAM because my history is mostly with MMORPGs and open world RPGs. Lots of data being constantly loaded and unloaded, then reloaded (think: Oblivion's city navigation).
#20 Posted by tourgen (4568 posts) -

Tested.com did that video were they built Jeff a PC. It's a pretty decent setup.

I'd personally go with an i5 2500k & an Nvidia 560 Ti. Get whatever RAM is recommended and tested for the mainboard you choose. Get at least 4gb. There are plenty of good cases out there just choose one. Don't get cheap on the power supply. Buy something that's reliable.

#21 Edited by warxsnake (2720 posts) -

@SlasherMan said:

@Ahmad_Metallic said:
@SlasherMan said:
@Ahmad_Metallic said:
@sfighter21: Firstly, Skyrim is a console game. I think you'd have a better experience with the PS3 version rather than the console port on the PC
How is it any different than Oblivion or Fallout, when both were console ports as well (or even most other multiplatform games for that matter)? The PC version will look better, run better, give you the option to use your preferred input method and, of course, mods.
Wait, Oblivion was a console port? then why was "Skyrim's lead platform is consoles" considered news ? i've seen several threads and articles about it a while back
Because people tend to forget fairly quickly. And it's the internet, people need something to bitch and moan about, otherwise they won't have anything to do with their lives.

The problem is, the term console-port has lost its meaning long ago. These days, as long as the game comes from renown developers with solid engines and tools, the game will be ok. The engines and tools are built to get the best product out for each platform. Separate versions of the game are built (baked) daily with profiles for each platform, pc, ps3, and xenon(xbox). The profiles determine which platform gets what. The PS3 is baked with textures that are half-resolution, the xbox is baked with other limitations, and the PC version is baked with all assets at their maximum quality (no compression).

The platform that is lead means most game mechanics and rendering functionality gets decided based on what that platform is capable of, and its limitations. As long as a game is multiplatform, it will never lead on PC, in this generation of consoles. The only developers that lead on PC are those that do not have efficient engine and tool pipelines in place.

You build your game to work on the lesser platforms, ensure it works on those platforms, and then sugar-coat it for the platforms that can handle it better (higher resolution textures, better SFX, less strict LODs, and so on).

It is impossible, development wise, to make a game that is a first-person-open-world-multiplatform-RPG (hands down and by far the hardest type of game to make based on this generation of consoles and their limitations), first on PC and then on consoles. You will have to make the game twice, with two separate development cycles spanning twice the amount of time it usually takes to create such a game, and you will end up with extremely different games that don't resemble each other or play the same way.

People who bitch about the fact that Skyrim is not a PC-lead development have absolutely no clue what next-gen game development really is, nor how it works.

If a "port" for PC does poorly, it's not because consoles were the lead platforms, it's because the developers either suck or don't give a shit. (Unpatched GTA4)

#22 Posted by SlasherMan (1723 posts) -
@warxsnake said:

@SlasherMan said:

@Ahmad_Metallic said:
@SlasherMan said:
@Ahmad_Metallic said:
@sfighter21: Firstly, Skyrim is a console game. I think you'd have a better experience with the PS3 version rather than the console port on the PC
How is it any different than Oblivion or Fallout, when both were console ports as well (or even most other multiplatform games for that matter)? The PC version will look better, run better, give you the option to use your preferred input method and, of course, mods.
Wait, Oblivion was a console port? then why was "Skyrim's lead platform is consoles" considered news ? i've seen several threads and articles about it a while back
Because people tend to forget fairly quickly. And it's the internet, people need something to bitch and moan about, otherwise they won't have anything to do with their lives.

The problem is, the term console-port has lost its meaning long ago. These days, as long as the game comes from renown developers with solid engines and tools, the game will be ok. The engines and tools are built to get the best product out for each platform. Separate versions of the game are built (baked) daily with profiles for each platform, pc, ps3, and xenon(xbox). The profiles determine which platform gets what. The PS3 is baked with textures that are half-resolution, the xbox is baked with other limitations, and the PC version is baked with all assets at their maximum quality (no compression).

The platform that is lead means most game mechanics and rendering functionality gets decided based on what that platform is capable of, and its limitations. As long as a game is multiplatform, it will never lead on PC, in this generation of consoles. The only developers that lead on PC are those that do not have efficient engine and tool pipelines in place.

You build your game to work on the lesser platforms, ensure it works on those platforms, and then sugar-coat it for the platforms that can handle it better (higher resolution textures, better SFX, less strict LODs, and so on).

It is impossible, development wise, to make a game that is a first-person-open-world-multiplatform-RPG (hands down and by far the hardest type of game to make based on this generation of consoles and their limitations), first on PC and then on consoles. You will have to make the game twice, with two separate development cycles spanning twice the amount of time it usually takes to create such a game, and you will end up with extremely different games that don't resemble each other or play the same way.

People who bitch about the fact that Skyrim is not a PC-lead development have absolutely no clue what next-gen game development really is, nor how it works.

Nice to see someone who has an insider perspective on this stuff weigh in on this. Always interesting to read.
#23 Posted by sfighter21 (833 posts) -
@Ahmad_Metallic said:
@sfighter21:  Firstly, Skyrim is a console game. I think you'd have a better experience with the PS3 version rather than the console port on the PC And to answer your questions: Yes, building your PC on your own is much cheaper than buying a pre-build. And you should approach this project based on your budget --> how much money are you willing to spend? It's all about your budget.
Yeah, I don't really know what my budget is.  Because I don't really know how much this project can potentially cost.  I will say this though, I am still a student with a part time job.  But, making decent money, because I still do live with my parents and don't have to pay rent.  Next year however, that will be a different story, haha.
 
@warxsnake
Wow dude, thanks.  That really helps me get an idea.  I'll also def check out the tested PC that was built.
#24 Posted by sfighter21 (833 posts) -

Also, thanks to everybody.  I read EVERY response.  I will def revive this forum thread when I have something to update.  Especially if I have any more questions.

#25 Posted by ShiftyMagician (2162 posts) -
@sfighter21 said:
Also, thanks to everybody.  I read EVERY response.  I will def revive this forum thread when I have something to update.  Especially if I have any more questions.
No worries mate.  Also as a money reference (though not sure if it will be accurate enough for you) but I live in Australia and hardware parts are a bit over-priced however what we earn kind of reduces that problem.  That being said, I spent about $803 recently on an Intel i7 2600k at 3.4GHz Sandy Bridge, Some standard ASUS motherboard that supports it, 1 500GB SATA hard drive at 7200rpm, an Antec 902 case and a pair of 4GB ram sticks totalling 8GB (ram is cheap nowadays from what I've seen so I thought why the hell not) but you can save a little and go to 4GB no problem.  I already had a Radeon HD 4890 at the moment but will upgrade that around October or so when most of the big games have recommended specs so I know which card to buy for what my budget is.   
 
Overall I have a pretty decent setup without going anywhere near $2000AU and still have a useable screen and disc drive to cover for the rest.  From there you can add parts later on to suit your PC needs, as usually you buy PC's for a lot more than just gaming.
#26 Posted by ShadowSkill11 (1879 posts) -

@sfighter21 said:

So, In anticipation for Skyrim, I am starting to think about building a PC. Now, I'm not that tech savvy, but I have been trying to do some research. From past observation, I have noticed that the GB community is pretty well versed in the building of PCs. I was thinking it would be cheaper to build a rig rather than buy one (e.g. Alienware, etc.). Is this true? And if so, where should I start my investment into this project? Understand that I am starting from scratch. I do not currently own a PC that I wish to upgrade. I want to build one, mainly for gaming, obviously. My laptop is good for everything else, lol. I know there aren't any specs for Skyrim yet, this is mainly for the purpose of building a gaming PC; Skyrim just helped nudge me along, haha. Any insight, help, advice of any kind would be GREATLY appreciated!! Thanks Duders!

RIght... if you have no idea what parts to get and why and don't even know that's it's cheaper and more efficient to build pc's yourself you are far more likely to fuck up the project and fry pieces with static electricity or buy just installing parts wrong. A community college A+ course says hi.

#27 Posted by sfighter21 (833 posts) -

Also, just for clarification, I'm not going to be building this thing all by myself (That would prob be a bad idea).  My engineer friend who knows his way inside of a computer said he'll help me out.  Just told me to buy the components and tell him when I'm ready to go... plus I've been watching the tested comp they built for Jeff.  Gives me a good idea on how to tackle this thing.  :)

#28 Posted by sfighter21 (833 posts) -
UPDATE:  Ok, so this is my current setup idea.  Any other suggestions/replacements/ideas would be MUCH appreciated.  I'm trying to keep this within $1000.
CPU:  i5 2500K $220
Optical Drive:  Sony Optiarc CD/DVD $20
Power:  Corsair Enthusiast 650W  $90
Storage:  WD 1.5 TB Already purchased this for $90
Memory:  Corsair 8GB DDR3 $75
Video Card:  AMD Sapphire 6950 $243
Case:  Cooler Master HAF 912 $60
Motherboard:  Ok, this is where I would like some guidance.  Seems like there are MANY options and mixed user reviews on many of the "cheaper" models.
 
So, the current total is about $798 without shipping costs included.
 Any suggestions on any other fans or cooling?  I picked the case because it seems to have good airflow.  Also, what about SSD?  Necessary, or not really?  Thanks guys.
#29 Edited by Sn1PeR (153 posts) -
@Ahmad_Metallic said:

@sfighter21:  Firstly, Skyrim is a console game. I think you'd have a better experience with the PS3 version rather than the console port on the PC  

 False.  Why?  Mods.  See Nehrim for a total conversion Oblivion mod that is absolutely wonderful.  Mods are still breathing new life into that game.
 
But he does have a point, Skyrim is going to be a dx9 console port.  In all reality it won't be that demanding at all. 
 
@sfighter21 said: 

UPDATE:  Ok, so this is my current setup idea.  Any other suggestions/replacements/ideas would be MUCH appreciated.  I'm trying to keep this within $1000.
CPU:  i5 2500K $220 
Optical Drive:  Sony Optiarc CD/DVD $20 
Power:  Corsair Enthusiast 650W  $90 
Storage:  WD 1.5 TB Already purchased this for $90 
Memory:  Corsair 8GB DDR3 $75 
Video Card:  AMD Sapphire 6950 $243 
Case:  Cooler Master HAF 912 $60 Motherboard:  Ok, this is where I would like some guidance.  Seems like there are MANY options and mixed user reviews on many of the "cheaper" models.  So, the current total is about $798 without shipping costs included.  Any suggestions on any other fans or cooling?  I picked the case because it seems to have good airflow.  Also, what about SSD?  Necessary, or not really?  Thanks guys.

This is a VERY solid build -- I would advise you to get the 2GB card instead, it's not much more and will give you more flexibility down the road (not to mention resale value).  As far as motherboards go I've built up an Asus P8Z68-V Pro for myself and a P8P67 Pro for my friend.  Both boards are great.  I would make sure to get one that can do 8x/8x PCI-E so you can upgrade to crossfire in the future.  I would recommend going with an aftermarket cooler.  I put Corsair H60's in both of these builds (mine in a Corsair 650D case, my friends in a Fractal R3 case).  I can very easily hit 4.5GHz on both machines.  A SSD is a luxury, and will most likely push you out of your price range.  If you went with a z68 you could use SSD caching with a small drive down the road.
#30 Posted by Ghooble (84 posts) -
@sfighter21: From my personal experience an nVidia card will usually triumph over ATI cards. I've owned both types and so far for DX11 (newer games) the extra tessellation cores found in nVidia's are extremely helpful. Especially for the upcoming games that will no doubt utilize them. I'd suggest something in the area of a GTX 560 judging by the price of the ATI card you linked. Just my 2 cents. 
-Ghooble
#31 Posted by sfighter21 (833 posts) -
@Sn1PeR: All right.  Thanks dude.  Very helpful!  I was leaning a bit toward getting an ASUS mobo.  And yeah, I was advised that getting an aftermarket cooler is better than the stock cooler that comes with the i5.  I still have time.  I can get all these things one by one before I need to build it.  I so far have only bought the internal HD and Memory (different from what I linked), because they were both daily deals on Newegg.  
 
 @Ghooble:   Thanks dude.  Much appreciated.  Yeah, that AMD video card is currently out of stock, so I'll prob look into that video card you suggested.  Again, thanks!
#32 Posted by Kidavenger (3859 posts) -

There isn't a single game out right now that would take advantage of more than 4gb of ram. It's cheap so no big deal buying more, but if it's limiting $$$ for your video card choices I would go to 4gb without even thinking about it.

You haven't said what you'd be using for a monitor yet; that will have a bearing on what kind of video card you'll want.

Asus is great for motherboards.

Need an OS too.

#33 Posted by sfighter21 (833 posts) -
@Kidavenger said:

There isn't a single game out right now that would take advantage of more than 4gb of ram. It's cheap so no big deal buying more, but if it's limiting $$$ for your video card choices I would go to 4gb without even thinking about it.

You haven't said what you'd be using for a monitor yet; that will have a bearing on what kind of video card you'll want.

Asus is great for motherboards.

Need an OS too.

Yeah, OS and monitor I didn't include in the pricing of building the comp.  I have a copy of Win 7 that I can use.  Monitor, well... I was thinking somewhere around 20-23 in.  Because I don't want something HUGE, but I still want something nice to look at.  My cousin was saying he'd let me buy his HD monitor/tv from him.  Its like a 20 in.
#34 Posted by RIDEBIRD (1252 posts) -

Don't overdo it, it's not going to be that demanding. Don't get a 580.

@warxsnake said:

The platform that is lead means most game mechanics and rendering functionality gets decided based on what that platform is capable of, and its limitations. As long as a game is multiplatform, it will never lead on PC, in this generation of consoles. The only developers that lead on PC are those that do not have efficient engine and tool pipelines in place.

So what you're saying is that Frostbite 2 is not an efficient engine, and that DICE doesn't have tool pipelines in place? That seems incredibly odd, seeing as it seems to be very optimized (one 580 running pre-alpha code in demos) and will be the most advanced engine in videogames when Battlefield 3 is out. Battlefield 3 is leading on PC and is a multi platform game. Several Capcom titles lead on PC and are multi platform, on the quite respected and well optimized MT Framework engine.

The issue with this generation the past two or three years is that PC constantly gets the short straw, with low res textures and general slack. This is just a curious question, but is that because of developers simply not creating assets of sufficient quality then? I mean, look at Dragon Age 2 and Crysis 2. Both of those games have very muddy textures when run on PC in full 1080 at maximum settings, and both games had high res textures packs released after the release of the game (well, on release day with DA2).

I'm not bitching that much over Skyrim, but I was very disappointed when I saw gameplay for the first time. It simply looks old. I've read that it's the 360 version they've shown, so hopefully the PC version will still look somewhat fresh and sharp, even though I think it will be severly limited because of the console versions - not in gameplay, but in graphics.

#35 Posted by MonetaryDread (2334 posts) -
@Ahmad_Metallic said:
@sfighter21:  Firstly, Skyrim is a console game. I think you'd have a better experience with the PS3 version rather than the console port on the PC
Obviously this guy doesn't know a thing about what he is talking about.  If you look at the history of Bethesda games, every console release has been utter shit in comparison to the console counterparts.  Hell the PS3 version that he recommends has always been the worst version of the console ports as well.
 
When it comes to building a PC, it is super simple nowadays.  It is seriously, don't stand on carpet with socks, ground yourself, then plug blue wire into the blue socket.
 
One tip of advice I can give though, is to never buy a PC one piece at a time.  Save up the money you will spend, then buy it all at once.  By the time you can afford a PC things will be cheaper, or more powerful.  The power supply is probably the most important piece of the machine.  When building just find out how much power you need, then add 20%.  Plus, I hate to say this, but wait until October if you can.  Every year at fall manufacturers start to release the new generation of hardware an I know that ATI is planning to soft-launch their new cards in September. Thatt is two months away, so it is worth the wait.
#36 Edited by warxsnake (2720 posts) -

@Ertard said:

Don't overdo it, it's not going to be that demanding. Don't get a 580.

@warxsnake said:

The platform that is lead means most game mechanics and rendering functionality gets decided based on what that platform is capable of, and its limitations. As long as a game is multiplatform, it will never lead on PC, in this generation of consoles. The only developers that lead on PC are those that do not have efficient engine and tool pipelines in place.

So what you're saying is that Frostbite 2 is not an efficient engine, and that DICE doesn't have tool pipelines in place? That seems incredibly odd, seeing as it seems to be very optimized (one 580 running pre-alpha code in demos) and will be the most advanced engine in videogames when Battlefield 3 is out. Battlefield 3 is leading on PC and is a multi platform game. Several Capcom titles lead on PC and are multi platform, on the quite respected and well optimized MT Framework engine.

The issue with this generation the past two or three years is that PC constantly gets the short straw, with low res textures and general slack. This is just a curious question, but is that because of developers simply not creating assets of sufficient quality then? I mean, look at Dragon Age 2 and Crysis 2. Both of those games have very muddy textures when run on PC in full 1080 at maximum settings, and both games had high res textures packs released after the release of the game (well, on release day with DA2).

I'm not bitching that much over Skyrim, but I was very disappointed when I saw gameplay for the first time. It simply looks old. I've read that it's the 360 version they've shown, so hopefully the PC version will still look somewhat fresh and sharp, even though I think it will be severly limited because of the console versions - not in gameplay, but in graphics.

You probably missed the dozen times in my OP where I specified that this rule applies mostly to open world games, especially first person open world games, where it would be stupid to develop a game for a higher platform and then spend twice the time breaking it down towards the consoles, because streaming and memory capabilities across the platforms are widely different, something that affects the very foundation of open world games, but corridor shooters and medium-sized-closed-map FPS games (and so on), not so much.

#37 Posted by Riddell (355 posts) -

It's really scary the amount of miss-information people spout when it comes to building PC's. 
 
You will need SLI 580's to run Battlefield 3! 
You need 16GB or RAM and a 1000W PSU for gaming! 
 
 OP, the build you have spec'd is solid, but I would suggest waiting until nearer the time to buy. Bulldozer should be coming out shortly and hardware prices only go one way; down.

#38 Posted by Murdouken (766 posts) -
@warxsnake: Console port doesn't even mean console port anymore. It's just come to mean "has features that originate on consoles." Obviously this isn't the literal meaning, but this seems to be how many people interpret it these. I saw a ton of people bitching that Planetside 2 was a console port and I was just kind of like "wh-what?"

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