Will Windows 8 Marketplace Will Not Sell...

#1 Edited by Wong_Fei_Hung (642 posts) -

*Apologies for the typo on the title

...18 rated games in Europe, and Mature rated games in the U.S...

This is completely nuts!, I'm not going anywhere near this as a consumer, how can this possibly appeal to any gamer, or am I missing something?. Also, should anyone know, will this crap have any role in Microsoft's next console, and if so how exactly?

What exactly has given rise to this BS?... How could Microsoft OK this knowing what it would mean to both gamers and developers. Will these rules be amended, they will have to be, won't they?

Thoughts?

UPDATE:

Dr Richard Wilson, CEO of TIGA, expressed sympathy with Microsoft's desire to regulate the content it distributes, but questions the wisdom of the move.
"Windows 8 is proving to be a very exciting platform for games developers and digital publishers," Dr Wilson told GamesIndustry International.
"Yet Microsoft's apparent decision not to sell PEGI 18 rated games or ESRB MATURE games will inevitably drive some developers and digital publishers away.
"This would be a great shame. However, games developers and digital publishers now have considerable choice over where to publish their games. If Microsoft will not welcome adult rated games then some developers will simply take their games to other publishers and platform owners. Hopefully Microsoft will change its position."
UKIE's Dr Jo Twist was keen to point out the distinction between the ratings systems for boxed and downloadable titles.
"The recent PEGI legislation in the UK only covers the sale of boxed products (which is still two thirds of the market in terms of value) either in-store or buying a physical game online. This makes it illegal for a retailer, whether a shop or a digital service, to sell boxed product games to children below the stated PEGI age rating.
"There is no single legal system for purely digital games (or any other online content) at the moment in the UK or overseas.
"There are however age ratings systems in place such as PEGI Express (as operated on Windows 8 mobile devices for game apps). Other online marketplaces have codes of conduct in place and monitoring to prevent inappropriate behaviour. On top of that, all the main consoles and pc operating systems have parental controls (linked to age ratings)."

Original Story

Thanks to GamesIndustry.biz:

"Microsoft's regulations for the forthcoming Windows 8 Marketplace will prevent the sale of any games rated above PEGI 16 in Europe, or Mature in the US. Because of this, no 18-rated games will be available to buy from the service in Europe at all.

Reading through an extensive piece by Casey Muratori which argues that Windows 8 will be a crushing blow to the games industry, a seemingly ridiculous section of Windows 8 legislation mentioned by Muratori early on leaps out:

"Your app must not contain adult content, and metadata must be appropriate for everyone. Apps with a rating over PEGI 16, ESRB MATURE, or that contain content that would warrant such a rating, are not allowed."

Whilst Mature is generally the highest bracket used for games in the US, a great deal of European titles are rated 18 by PEGI, meaning that, although they would run happily enough under Microsoft's new operating system, they wouldn't be available for purchase via the store - the only place to buy games which are designed for 8's interfaces and features.

Put simply, a customer who buys games for a new Windows 8 system purely through the Marketplace would have no access to many of the most critically and commercially successful games of the last 15 years, nor any future titles which transgress its guidelines.

Muratori goes on to highlight some of the deciding factors in those guidelines.

"Your app must not contain content or functionality that encourages, facilitates, or glamorizes illegal activity."
"Your app must not contain content that encourages, facilitates or glamorizes excessive or irresponsible use of alcohol or tobacco products, drugs or weapons."
"Your app must not contain excessive or gratuitous profanity."

Microsoft has since confirmed these rules to Kotaku, telling the blog that they will apply to all games submitted to the Marketplace. Microsoft's PR agency Edstrom also clarified the situation for Muratori when he enquired about alternative submission methods for software using the Metro interface.

"No, you cannot distribute Windows Store apps without going through the Windows Store. The exception to this is for enterprise apps. Developers can, however, create and offer desktop apps the same way they always have - through their own site or distribution point.

Thanks to:

* Can a moderator please move this to the PC forum ~ thanks :)

#2 Edited by AndrewB (7589 posts) -

Can we have clarification of what "over Mature" means? Sounds to me like they won't allow ratings *over* an M (meaning they're blocking AO ratings), which in itself is dumb because there might not be a whole lot of wholesome adult rated games, but maybe there should be (I'm an adult). But at least that wouldn't be the Windows apocalypse that banning M rated games would be.

Then again, these days the only reason I use Windows as an OS is because of games support, so I'm totally okay with Microsoft pushing away the rest of their audience in favor of OS X or Linux on the desktop.

"Your app must not contain content or functionality that encourages, facilitates, or glamorizes illegal activity."
"Your app must not contain content that encourages, facilitates or glamorizes excessive or irresponsible use of alcohol or tobacco products, drugs or weapons."
"Your app must not contain excessive or gratuitous profanity."

Though those criteria directly go against even a T rating... so maybe that's wrong.

#3 Edited by believer258 (11808 posts) -

So... why can't someone use Steam or Amazon to buy their M rated games?

As for the next consoles, Call of Duty and Halo games are M rated and those are all best-sellers; I don't think MS is going to block those at all, or even knock them down to a lower rating. I think this is something aimed squarely at the casual market.

Online
#4 Posted by AndrewB (7589 posts) -

@believer258 said:

So... why can't someone use Steam or Amazon to buy their M rated games?

And that's the other thing. If Microsoft is so restrictive with their policies, their marketplace in terms of gaming will leave it to become another Games For Windows Live. I wouldn't be worried about this in the slightest.

#5 Posted by Ravenlight (8040 posts) -

Guess who's not going to ever use Windows 8 Marketplace.

Everyone.

#6 Posted by Brodehouse (9882 posts) -

Famous Players doesn't show NC-17 movies.

#7 Posted by banishedsoul1 (294 posts) -

install linux for free don't buy this awful os.

#8 Posted by Amafi (705 posts) -

This is for fucking Metro apps. ie iphone games. I'm fairly sure their g4wlive store will sell their own M+ rated games, either through some new games for windows marketplace app or through marketplace.xbox.com/PC, and Origin and Steam will still be able to run and install desktop games (the kind you want) just like in 7. So maybe the windows marketplace won't carry a potential windows 8 RT port of the iphone GTA3 port, but I can't say I care much. In fact, they could remove that entire part of the OS and I wouldn't bat an eyelid.

I really don't see the big deal at all, I was under the impression IOS also did not allow R rated stuff on their market?

#9 Edited by Sooty (8082 posts) -

It's only Windows Phone / Tablet. So this really doesn't matter, that platform isn't going anywhere for a while because app support is still going to be miles behind iOS and Android.

I don't see this as a problem for the Windows 8 marketplace because I don't think I'll ever buy games from there.

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