PSN - What's the big deal?

With the recent news that millions of PSN users personal information has been compromised, I've seen a lot of people up in arms over this. And understandably so, having your credit card details out there is one thing; not knowing about it until nearly a week after it happened - that's another.

But what's the worst that could happen?

Some guy buys a yacht with your credit card. Big deal. They trace it back to him and it's case solved, right? Perhaps he shares the info with some of his friends, or even the internett, any purchase fraud is covered by Visa, Mastercard etc, no?

Am I taking this too lightly, or are people blowing this way out of proportion?

39 Comments
40 Comments
Posted by EVO

With the recent news that millions of PSN users personal information has been compromised, I've seen a lot of people up in arms over this. And understandably so, having your credit card details out there is one thing; not knowing about it until nearly a week after it happened - that's another.

But what's the worst that could happen?

Some guy buys a yacht with your credit card. Big deal. They trace it back to him and it's case solved, right? Perhaps he shares the info with some of his friends, or even the internett, any purchase fraud is covered by Visa, Mastercard etc, no?

Am I taking this too lightly, or are people blowing this way out of proportion?

Posted by Zidd

Cleaning up after dirtbags who steal you identity is not as easy as you seem to think it is.

Posted by Malphye

While I never use credit card information for consoles (I buy prepaid cards), the thought of not just 1 but an unknown amount of people knowing my information is stressful. Some people just don't want to deal with crap like that.

Posted by Vinny_Says
@Zidd said:
" Cleaning up after dirtbags who steal you identity is not as easy as you seem to think it is. "
Posted by natetodamax

Why would anyone just be okay with strangers knowing their name, address, and credit card information?

Posted by MightyDuck
@Delphye:
I too do not use credit cards when it comes to consoles.  Thankfully we should be okay in regards to that right?
Online
Posted by Sarkhan

I kinda agree. Im as calm as a kitty in the sun:) I will wait for my freakout when something happens with my accounts.
Dont get me wrong. This is still insane! And it can happen with every online store. It just happend to a store with 60mil+ active members.....

But again, no need to freak out at the moment(IMO) Let's just wait and see:)

Ps: Take your precursion ofc.
Posted by Malphye
@GetWhatYagive:  They would still get our addresses and email but I'd say they would skip us and goto town with the ones with all the information they need to start buying whole volumes of sailor moon online. At least thats what I would do, without the anime dvds of course...
Edited by BaconBits
@Zidd said:

" Cleaning up after dirtbags who steal you identity is not as easy as you seem to think it is. "

seriously, many times victims don't know until after the bank calls up some bill collection agency to come after them, and those guys aren't very nice...
Posted by WillyLo

It's definitely not so bad for credit card stuff, but if these people were able to steal your identity, that is a whole new ball game. Now as to how they are able to do it, with just a name and address, I don't know.

I don't have much else in there other than my name, add, phone and cred. Which still is scary thinkin about it, I've removed all my info from all my systems and steam cause of it. I should of a few months ago, had a buddy on XB and PS get hacked and they downloaded a bunch of games to their system and racked up 300-500 on their cards :S.

IGN put up a good article about what to do if you're credit card gets used :

 http://ps3.ign.com/articles/116/1164194p1.html

Posted by EVO
@natetodamax said:
" Why would anyone just be okay with strangers knowing their name, address, and credit card information? "
You shouldn't have a credit card in the first place if your concerned with strangers knowing your info. Many people can easily obtain credit card details if they want.
Posted by zombie2011

How old are you, 12?

Posted by EVO
@zombie2011 said:
" How old are you, 12? "
Turning 13 next month.
Posted by smitty86

I honesty don't feel as worried as everyone else I guess.  I keep an eye on my account and will easily spot some shady shit on there but outside of that most of the talk about stolen identities and the like is all speculation mostly seeded in people's want to know they are completely secure. I'm definitely not saying that this whole situation is pretty idiotic but I don't feel the now is the time to set my social security card ablaze and prepare my new life as Mr. Thompson from Terror Lake.

Posted by swfcfan
@EVO said:
Some guy buys a yacht with your credit card.
OMG some guy has just bought a bloody yacht using my credit card!

Thanks Sony :(
Posted by MightyDuck
@Delphye:
That's what I'm hoping.  The only real thing I have on there is my email.  Went ahead and changed all passwords just to be safe.
Online
Posted by PenguinDust

Identity theft can effect your credit rating and that can last for 7 to 10 years.  Maybe today you're not worried about such things, but a few years down the line if you want to buy a car or even a home, it might.  People need to see past today.   Now, I say this with the assumption that the hackers have stolen active credit cards and are using them.  If they haven't, then it's much less a problem.  According to Ars Technica, they got your name, address, email address and some PSN info like login etc...  With all the people running around with Facebook accounts and what-not, I don't think most of that information is that important provided you don't act the fool and answer the Nigerian prince's email request for aid.  A lot of it is public record.   However, if the hackers have your credit card information with expiration dates then that could be a very big problem and if wide spread credit card fraud occurs this could drag on for years.  

Posted by MagusMaleficus

Luckily I don't have a credit card, just a bank card, and my spending limit on said bank card is ridiculously low. Nobody can buy a yacht with my weak-ass card. :P In addition, I get email alerts if more than $50 is spent in one transaction. Can be annoying at times, but it could potentially be a lifesaver.


I also already had a fraud alert put up by all three credit bureaus, but I alerted them about this situation anyway, just to be safe.
Posted by Towers
@PenguinDust said:
" Identity theft can effect your credit rating and that can last for 7 to 10 years.  Maybe today you're not worried about such things, but a few years down the line if you want to buy a car or even a home, it might.  People need to see past today.   Now, I say this with the assumption that the hackers have stolen active credit cards and are using them.  If they haven't, then it's much less a problem.  According to Ars Technica, they got your name, address, email address and some PSN info like login etc...  With all the people running around with Facebook accounts and what-not, I don't think most of that information is that important provided you don't act the fool and answer the Nigerian prince's email request for aid.  A lot of it is public record.   However, if the hackers have your credit card information with expiration dates then that could be a very big problem and if wide spread credit card fraud occurs this could drag on for years.   "
Exactly the reason I had my CC re-issued. It was a 3 minute call and I get a new uncompromised card in a week. Somehow I think I can manage to go a week without my CC.

I guess we'll see.
Edited by FireBurger

Having your identity stolen is not something easily cleaned up. An identity thief can totally destroy your credit and generally fuck things up for you. It then takes a lot of time on a phone, and a lot of hoop jumping to hopefully get things corrected. It isn't some little deal that a quick phone call erases.

Posted by EVO
@FireBurger said:

" Having your identity stolen is not something easily cleaned up. An identity thief can totally destroy your credit and generally fuck things up for you. It then takes a lot of time on a phone, and a lot of hoop jumping to hopefully get things corrected. It isn't some little deal that a quick phone call erases. "

OK, worst case scenario: he uses your credit card details. Sure, it would be a major pain in the ass. But:
  1. the odds of that happening are akin to winning the lottery
  2. such purchase fraud would only leave a crumb trail for the authorities to track him down.

So unless this guy wants to risk blowing his cover, he can't do shit.
Edited by Mr_Skeleton

Identity thefts are nothing new, the criminals usually just steam a few dollars from each acount and the bank usually pays the customer back (although in most cases it's the customer's fault), but in this case the personal details of millions (might) have been stolen which means tha banks won't pay back and people would sue Sony for a lot of $. Also the damage all of this has caused people to not trust Sony which in the long run will cost them whole lot more.

Edited by Mr_Skeleton
@EVO said:

"

                    @FireBurger said:

"
                Having your identity stolen is not something easily cleaned up. An identity thief can totally destroy your credit and generally fuck things up for you. It then takes a lot of time on a phone, and a lot of hoop jumping to hopefully get things corrected. It isn't some little deal that a quick phone call erases.
            "

OK, worst case scenario: he uses your credit card details. Sure, it would be a major pain in the ass. But:
  1. the odds of that happening are akin to winning the lottery
  2. such purchase fraud would only leave a crumb trail for the authorities to track him down.

So unless this guy wants to risk blowing his cover, he can't do shit.

                   

                "

If you only knew how often identity thefts happened you wouldn't say that, and for the most part the police don't catch the hackers (who usually are employed by russian mafias).
Posted by KaosAngel
@Mr_Skeleton said:
"If you only knew how often identity thefts happened you wouldn't say that, and for the most part the police don't catch the hackers (who usually are employed by russian mafias). "
This is wrong.  The PartyVan IRC said the FBI was involved and some users on the PartyVan IRC vanished.  The guess is that the people who hacked PSN did it Stateside.  
Posted by Mr_Skeleton
@KaosAngel: I didn't say all of them.
Posted by EVO
@KaosAngel said:
" @Mr_Skeleton said:
"If you only knew how often identity thefts happened you wouldn't say that, and for the most part the police don't catch the hackers (who usually are employed by russian mafias). "
This is wrong.  The PartyVan IRC said the FBI was involved and some users on the PartyVan IRC vanished.  The guess is that the people who hacked PSN did it Stateside.   "
So... the Russian mafia took out some PartyVan users?
Posted by audiosnag
@EVO said:
" @FireBurger said:

" Having your identity stolen is not something easily cleaned up. An identity thief can totally destroy your credit and generally fuck things up for you. It then takes a lot of time on a phone, and a lot of hoop jumping to hopefully get things corrected. It isn't some little deal that a quick phone call erases. "

OK, worst case scenario: he uses your credit card details. Sure, it would be a major pain in the ass. But:
  1. the odds of that happening are akin to winning the lottery
  2. such purchase fraud would only leave a crumb trail for the authorities to track him down.

So unless this guy wants to risk blowing his cover, he can't do shit. "
You can't possibly be serious...
....are you being serious? I refuse to believe you're being serious.
Dude this is not a small issue. If you think it is you have your head buried waaaaay down deep in the sand. Lets just say you're right about it being easy to clear up a case of identity theft (it absolutely isn't) the fact that it took Sony this long to inform the public is inexcusable.
Posted by ryanwho

Credit theft: happens as often as the lottery. And other nuggets of wisdom brought to you by Karl Pilkington.

Posted by EVO
@audiosnag:  Serious as a heart attack. I just find it hard to believe that some guy, most likely dwelling in his parents basement, can single-handedly obtain all this info. But Sony, with all their resources can't track this fucker down? It can't be that hard.
Edited by audiosnag
@EVO: You're missing the point though. Yeah they can be tracked down but they can do a serious amount of damage before they're caught. And even if you clear things up and don't lose any money, or you have it returned its not as easy as going "this is the real me" it's a massive headache and costs you a butt ton of hours.
And again...Sony not telling the public for an entire week...I'ma say it again...an entire week that their private information was at risk is in-bloody-excusable. This is not a rinky dink mom and pop start up who you can understand might make some mistakes. This is a massive company with an army of lawyers who should know better.
Is it Sony's fault they got hacked? No (although I've heard they were aware of the weak security but lets ignore that)
Is it Sony's fault for handling as piss poor as they did? Absolutely.
Posted by VanillaPlant

Yo, don't feed the troll.

Edited by Xolare
@EVO said:

" @FireBurger said:

" Having your identity stolen is not something easily cleaned up. An identity thief can totally destroy your credit and generally fuck things up for you. It then takes a lot of time on a phone, and a lot of hoop jumping to hopefully get things corrected. It isn't some little deal that a quick phone call erases. "

OK, worst case scenario: he uses your credit card details. Sure, it would be a major pain in the ass. But:
  1. the odds of that happening are akin to winning the lottery
  2. such purchase fraud would only leave a crumb trail for the authorities to track him down.

So unless this guy wants to risk blowing his cover, he can't do shit. "
I'm thinking you watch too much Law and Order.
Posted by MaFoLu
@ryanwho said:
" Credit theft: happens as often as the lottery. And other nuggets of wisdom brought to you by Karl Pilkington. "
I was just listening to how a day in Karl Pilkingtons life looks... Creepy...
Posted by EVO
@audiosnag said:
" And again...Sony not telling the public for an entire week...I'ma say it again...an entire week that their private information was at risk is in-bloody-excusable."
Did you even read my OP? I addressed that in the first sentence!

@VanillaPlant said:
" Yo, don't feed the troll. "
Dude, I'm no fucking troll. Just trying to spread some sorely lacking optimism around these parts.
Posted by audiosnag
@EVO:
You acknowledge it's an issue and then immediately contradict that by going "But hey guys...relaaaaax its no big deal! What's the worst that could happen, amirite?"
Being optimistic doesn't change the fact that this is a big deal.
Posted by Zidd
@EVO: You aren't spreading optimism you are spreading misinformation at best
Posted by hexx462
@EVO said:
" @zombie2011 said:
" How old are you, 12? "
Turning 13 next month. "
This kind of sums up the entire thread doesn't it? Even if it's sarcasm, I'd say that's an accurate estimation of the OPs age mentally.

While it is highly likely that nothing will happen to vast majority of PSN users concerning their personal information, the risk is still there. Which would piss off any sane adult who trusted Sony with said information, myself included.
Posted by EVO
@audiosnag: Is it really that big of a deal, when chances are nothing will come from this? PSN will eventually come back online, millions of people will continue using their credit cards, and some poor guy might even be a victim of identity theft.
Posted by audiosnag
@EVO:
One day you'll understand...one day.
Posted by histeachn

This is something that will affect different people in different ways.  I'm personally aware that identity theft is a problem, but it hasn't happened to me or anyone I know so I am at a loss in that respect.  I think it's not unreasonable for people to take precautions because of that, but I think it's also possible to have a more measured response about this without getting too focused on the worst case scenario.  Prepare for it or even anticipate it, but still be open to the possibility you may not be affected.  I haven't had any real problems with Sony or the PS3 up until this point, and I haven't noticed anything off with my bank account.  Yet, of course, but we'll see. 

It's a double-edged sword with this:  this resulted from one hacker getting the root key and another exploiting it, but it's also on Sony's head because this security breach was hardware related and essentially something they cannot fix without all new hardware(as had been pointed out to me in a comment section yesterday).  So . . . I'd be making an understatement if I said this was a messy situation.  I won't deny Sony the opportunity to learn from this, though, but I think there have been enough PR nightmares in the past few years to help them on that front.  That being said, I'd rather they be thorough first and know the full scope of the situation than make a premature statement and backtrack. 

The only perspective I have a hard time sympathizing with are those taking an extreme response, the type of responses that sound more like comments made on yahoo.news.com than someone just realizing they need to do what they need to do to cover their bases.