Why Americans will never accept Soccer as a "real" sport.

Notice: This was updated and rewritten on July 7th, 2011. On paragraph 8, I used Very few information based from Another article. Yeah, it means what you think it means, but not even that close. I watched small portions of some of the previous World Cup matches recently. I would add: Soccer just looks strange. But internationally, It really is Football.  
 
If there's a standard concern among any retiring player, it's how the game will remember them. Even the elite sometimes wonder if they'll be remembered at all, triumphs in their time reduced to relatively mundane memories years removed and ultimately stored away. It happens in all sports, but the collective memory of American soccer has always been fragile and fragmented. We exist in a soccer culture that can forget entire leagues, much less the members of the teams that played in them.  No American soccer fan needs to have the lack of coherency explained. Multiple leagues and structures end up unfocused, the stories susceptible to the kind of gradual erosion that leaves them too linear and often times suspect. Attempts at reconstruction end up impressive only to the true believers, with the rest of the audience wondering exactly why we're supposed to care. It's a fair point.  Clubs fade along with their players. Remember the Wings, the Quicksilvers, the Foxes, the Roughnecks? Sure, there was that game ... but the structure for the story is lacking. Instead, we get an amalgam that turns a story into, at best, a myth and, at worst, a fabrication.   
 
Yep, I remember ... Only it wasn't that season, much less that day, and you got the city wrong. There is so much to remember. So many clubs, players, tournaments. The players themselves might have an almost encyclopedic recall that borders on scary, but the rest of us usually have more of a sense of scene if anything.  Even that gets easily confused. Repository thinking has its own fans and limitations, putting what we can fairly categorize as trivia before the story. That can reap a kind of dismissive acknowledgment from fans as well as those within the game.   
 
Sure, we all recognize American soccer has tradition. But it's a new day where the past isn't going to help us figure out global sponsorship markets, stadium construction, and the contemporary transfer system. At least that's what those actively forming the future of American pro soccer occasionally deign to tell us.  In many ways, it's a fair point.  Induction ceremonies have become feel good events that capsulate eras in the experiences of a handful of players, the elite of the elite. By default, that's an exercise in marginalizing. Even slightly removed, and the broader story becomes more about getting at the main, and hopefully short, point. The museum exhibit ideal of history.  Our game moves on.  Pay tacit acknowledgment to the past but work to press forward towards a promotional future. One that doesn't necessarily need a historical foundation for legitimacy. Tradition can be built. We've seen just that repeated multiple times. Carting it over wholesale with the International Soccer League in the early '60s, through the regenerative efforts the North American Soccer League used every third or fourth season, and up to Major League Soccer, which set all of that aside over a decade ago.  In the end, tradition only really matters as a profit motive.   
 
Nobody should reasonably argue that profit margin shouldn't be at the heart of the American professional game. Soccer clubs aren't civic trusts, existing for the good of the community and funded through that mentality. To some, neither are Hall of Fames nor museums outside of those with endowments paying operating costs. The North American Soccer League setup shop in 40 markets. Add in the Major Indoor Soccer League, and that number increases to just about any city of size you can name.  All stories, all connecting a group of fans to the tradition that creates contemporary American soccer. Few if any of them offer enough monetary justification for telling their stories. So we move to what story we're interested in hearing. If it's the highlight-reel version of American soccer history, we have that in a building off an interstate in New York. If it's the struggle of American professional soccer clubs and players trying to make it work, tied to place and fans, then there's an alternative history of attempted markets, overlooked teams, and the stories that don't necessarily include the usual names.  
 
In a world of adults there's no sense in pretending that right intention will or even should win the day. But before we let entire leagues pass on with a limited memorial and good intentions, it might be worth considering real preservation. We have the history of a game that has set up shop everywhere from the biggest stadiums in the country, to some of the most obscure arenas, always trying to find its place. We also have a National Soccer Hall of Fame pressured to show a profit rather than what should be a clear mandate on behalf of the clubs and players that have gone before: serve as the permanent and supported home of the full history of American soccer. It's time professional soccer allows the Hall to do that job.
  
Americans know that our Obama-voting suburban elite deliberately has replaced American-style football in its own schools with multicultural, politically correct, non-violent soccer. The replacement of football by soccer is a metonymy for the community of fashion’s rejection of “hard, isolate, stoic” traditional American culture in favor of a less decidedly masculine internationalist alternative. New Canaan and Brookline are saying to the rest of America: “We don’t want to be provincial ruffians like you. We want to be Italian or Brazilian.”   
  
Finally, Soccer games are accompanied by what Dan Nosowitz aptly describes as the “grating, stab-your-ears-with-a-pencil drone of the vuvuzela,” an obnoxious plastic horn which was apparently first adopted by the Zulus of South Africa to replace their dreaded iklwa Soccer as it is known to Americans, is the worlds most popular sport! It is played by millions in every country around the world. The World Cups in 2006 and 2010 had an estimated average of 700+ million viewers not including people inside and outside the stadium. The two biggest leagues (English Premier League and Italian Serie A) have more fans than the NFL, MLB, NHL, NBA or any other American professional sports league. The fans are amazing (I mean they riot for the most pointless games, yet in the US you have to win a World Series to riot). Games have near 100,000 people at them, every one sings songs, drinks, celebrates, and cheers on their favorite club. Every one I know that has traveled to Europe and gone to a match has become a soccer fan because of the atmosphere at a game. Yet why do Americans still consider it a "sissy" sport? 
  
Professional Soccer players or as Americans insist on calling them "Foot fairies" have a skill and athletic ability that most people can only dream of. Last year's World Cup took place in South Africa from June 11th through July 11th. The United States actually had a good team that year unlike the team they had back in the 2006 FIFA World Cup. Yet no body seems to care. Is this because the MLS has been a huge failure? Or are people in America too stubborn to realize that this sport is truly a great sport! Sorry Americans but your version of Football is only watched by 1 country, REAL FOOTBALL is watched in every country in the world! Think about the amazing accomplishments the U.S Soccer team has done historically and recently. They've reached Third in the inaugural 1930 World Cup, They've won 4 CONCACAF Gold Cups (Recently in 2007), They've even reached fourth in a Copa America once. Want more? They've won a Silver and a Bronze medal in the 1904 St. Louis Summer Olympic Games, they've reached the Quarterfinals of the 2002 FIFA World Cup, They've beaten the #1 team in the world Spain back in 2009, and finished Runner-ups in the 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup only losing to Brazil. Still want more? They've reached 4th in the FIFA World Rankings in April of 2006, They've beaten former World Cup Winners Argentina, Brazil, Germany, and Uruguay, and lets not forget that stunning win over England back in the 1950 FIFA World Cup in Brazil. 
 
Now, Nobody does not acknowledge this, but they should know that our National Soccer Team in not a complete failure at all. The only reason why Americans think Soccer is a "Girly" Sport is because they're used to watching 250'lb Men tackling each other just for a Ball that looks like a cone or watching a Hoops Superstar making a 360 degree Slam Dunk on a 7-Footer. I don't blame them. When I was a little boy I used to play Soccer with other kids but by the time we've turned to teenagers We think of Football, Partying, and Beautiful Cheerleaders. In that perspective Teenagers can't play Football and Soccer at the same time. Think of me for example; I like playing Soccer and watch Soccer games but by the time I was 10, I started to become more interested in Basketball than Soccer. In the end I chose Basketball over Soccer in my first year of High School. It was a tough decision for me, but I still love and watch the beautiful game of Soccer today. Perhaps most of you out there think that Soccer is just boring and unexciting, but mark my words, there will be a time in which Soccer will be one of the top sports in the U.S. Now I want to hear your answer and opinion on this question: Does any one know why soccer cannot be accepted in the United States?

234 Comments
236 Comments
Edited by Hardgamer

Notice: This was updated and rewritten on July 7th, 2011. On paragraph 8, I used Very few information based from Another article. Yeah, it means what you think it means, but not even that close. I watched small portions of some of the previous World Cup matches recently. I would add: Soccer just looks strange. But internationally, It really is Football.  
 
If there's a standard concern among any retiring player, it's how the game will remember them. Even the elite sometimes wonder if they'll be remembered at all, triumphs in their time reduced to relatively mundane memories years removed and ultimately stored away. It happens in all sports, but the collective memory of American soccer has always been fragile and fragmented. We exist in a soccer culture that can forget entire leagues, much less the members of the teams that played in them.  No American soccer fan needs to have the lack of coherency explained. Multiple leagues and structures end up unfocused, the stories susceptible to the kind of gradual erosion that leaves them too linear and often times suspect. Attempts at reconstruction end up impressive only to the true believers, with the rest of the audience wondering exactly why we're supposed to care. It's a fair point.  Clubs fade along with their players. Remember the Wings, the Quicksilvers, the Foxes, the Roughnecks? Sure, there was that game ... but the structure for the story is lacking. Instead, we get an amalgam that turns a story into, at best, a myth and, at worst, a fabrication.   
 
Yep, I remember ... Only it wasn't that season, much less that day, and you got the city wrong. There is so much to remember. So many clubs, players, tournaments. The players themselves might have an almost encyclopedic recall that borders on scary, but the rest of us usually have more of a sense of scene if anything.  Even that gets easily confused. Repository thinking has its own fans and limitations, putting what we can fairly categorize as trivia before the story. That can reap a kind of dismissive acknowledgment from fans as well as those within the game.   
 
Sure, we all recognize American soccer has tradition. But it's a new day where the past isn't going to help us figure out global sponsorship markets, stadium construction, and the contemporary transfer system. At least that's what those actively forming the future of American pro soccer occasionally deign to tell us.  In many ways, it's a fair point.  Induction ceremonies have become feel good events that capsulate eras in the experiences of a handful of players, the elite of the elite. By default, that's an exercise in marginalizing. Even slightly removed, and the broader story becomes more about getting at the main, and hopefully short, point. The museum exhibit ideal of history.  Our game moves on.  Pay tacit acknowledgment to the past but work to press forward towards a promotional future. One that doesn't necessarily need a historical foundation for legitimacy. Tradition can be built. We've seen just that repeated multiple times. Carting it over wholesale with the International Soccer League in the early '60s, through the regenerative efforts the North American Soccer League used every third or fourth season, and up to Major League Soccer, which set all of that aside over a decade ago.  In the end, tradition only really matters as a profit motive.   
 
Nobody should reasonably argue that profit margin shouldn't be at the heart of the American professional game. Soccer clubs aren't civic trusts, existing for the good of the community and funded through that mentality. To some, neither are Hall of Fames nor museums outside of those with endowments paying operating costs. The North American Soccer League setup shop in 40 markets. Add in the Major Indoor Soccer League, and that number increases to just about any city of size you can name.  All stories, all connecting a group of fans to the tradition that creates contemporary American soccer. Few if any of them offer enough monetary justification for telling their stories. So we move to what story we're interested in hearing. If it's the highlight-reel version of American soccer history, we have that in a building off an interstate in New York. If it's the struggle of American professional soccer clubs and players trying to make it work, tied to place and fans, then there's an alternative history of attempted markets, overlooked teams, and the stories that don't necessarily include the usual names.  
 
In a world of adults there's no sense in pretending that right intention will or even should win the day. But before we let entire leagues pass on with a limited memorial and good intentions, it might be worth considering real preservation. We have the history of a game that has set up shop everywhere from the biggest stadiums in the country, to some of the most obscure arenas, always trying to find its place. We also have a National Soccer Hall of Fame pressured to show a profit rather than what should be a clear mandate on behalf of the clubs and players that have gone before: serve as the permanent and supported home of the full history of American soccer. It's time professional soccer allows the Hall to do that job.
  
Americans know that our Obama-voting suburban elite deliberately has replaced American-style football in its own schools with multicultural, politically correct, non-violent soccer. The replacement of football by soccer is a metonymy for the community of fashion’s rejection of “hard, isolate, stoic” traditional American culture in favor of a less decidedly masculine internationalist alternative. New Canaan and Brookline are saying to the rest of America: “We don’t want to be provincial ruffians like you. We want to be Italian or Brazilian.”   
  
Finally, Soccer games are accompanied by what Dan Nosowitz aptly describes as the “grating, stab-your-ears-with-a-pencil drone of the vuvuzela,” an obnoxious plastic horn which was apparently first adopted by the Zulus of South Africa to replace their dreaded iklwa Soccer as it is known to Americans, is the worlds most popular sport! It is played by millions in every country around the world. The World Cups in 2006 and 2010 had an estimated average of 700+ million viewers not including people inside and outside the stadium. The two biggest leagues (English Premier League and Italian Serie A) have more fans than the NFL, MLB, NHL, NBA or any other American professional sports league. The fans are amazing (I mean they riot for the most pointless games, yet in the US you have to win a World Series to riot). Games have near 100,000 people at them, every one sings songs, drinks, celebrates, and cheers on their favorite club. Every one I know that has traveled to Europe and gone to a match has become a soccer fan because of the atmosphere at a game. Yet why do Americans still consider it a "sissy" sport? 
  
Professional Soccer players or as Americans insist on calling them "Foot fairies" have a skill and athletic ability that most people can only dream of. Last year's World Cup took place in South Africa from June 11th through July 11th. The United States actually had a good team that year unlike the team they had back in the 2006 FIFA World Cup. Yet no body seems to care. Is this because the MLS has been a huge failure? Or are people in America too stubborn to realize that this sport is truly a great sport! Sorry Americans but your version of Football is only watched by 1 country, REAL FOOTBALL is watched in every country in the world! Think about the amazing accomplishments the U.S Soccer team has done historically and recently. They've reached Third in the inaugural 1930 World Cup, They've won 4 CONCACAF Gold Cups (Recently in 2007), They've even reached fourth in a Copa America once. Want more? They've won a Silver and a Bronze medal in the 1904 St. Louis Summer Olympic Games, they've reached the Quarterfinals of the 2002 FIFA World Cup, They've beaten the #1 team in the world Spain back in 2009, and finished Runner-ups in the 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup only losing to Brazil. Still want more? They've reached 4th in the FIFA World Rankings in April of 2006, They've beaten former World Cup Winners Argentina, Brazil, Germany, and Uruguay, and lets not forget that stunning win over England back in the 1950 FIFA World Cup in Brazil. 
 
Now, Nobody does not acknowledge this, but they should know that our National Soccer Team in not a complete failure at all. The only reason why Americans think Soccer is a "Girly" Sport is because they're used to watching 250'lb Men tackling each other just for a Ball that looks like a cone or watching a Hoops Superstar making a 360 degree Slam Dunk on a 7-Footer. I don't blame them. When I was a little boy I used to play Soccer with other kids but by the time we've turned to teenagers We think of Football, Partying, and Beautiful Cheerleaders. In that perspective Teenagers can't play Football and Soccer at the same time. Think of me for example; I like playing Soccer and watch Soccer games but by the time I was 10, I started to become more interested in Basketball than Soccer. In the end I chose Basketball over Soccer in my first year of High School. It was a tough decision for me, but I still love and watch the beautiful game of Soccer today. Perhaps most of you out there think that Soccer is just boring and unexciting, but mark my words, there will be a time in which Soccer will be one of the top sports in the U.S. Now I want to hear your answer and opinion on this question: Does any one know why soccer cannot be accepted in the United States?

Posted by Guided_By_Tigers

You are awesome, Hardgamer.

Posted by PenguinDust

Americans are only interested in sports we invented.  Baseball, basketball, American football.  End story.

Posted by Niall_Sg1

If you think you're watching violence with American Football try watching Rugby. 

Posted by Extreme_Popcorn

Football cannot be accepted in the US because you're shit it at it

Posted by shinigami420
Posted by billnyethesciencepie

Its because there usually 2 goals a game through the entire 3 hours 
 
Its boring as FUCK

Posted by MikeGosot

Football is pretty cool. But here in Brazil, EVERYWHERE YOU LOOK there is football. Hell, my Math teacher just uses Soccer T-Shirts. 

Posted by EuanDewar

@billnyethesciencepie said:

Its because there usually 2 goals a game through the entire 3 hours Its boring as FUCK

3 hours? What?

Posted by MikeGosot
@EuanDewar said:

@billnyethesciencepie said:

Its because there usually 2 goals a game through the entire 3 hours Its boring as FUCK

3 hours? What?

Posted by CL60
@PenguinDust said:
Americans are only interested in sports we invented.  Baseball, basketball, American football.  End story.
Technically Canada made basketball, the Canadian that made it just moved to the US when he made it.
Posted by Hardgamer
@Buck_Sexington said:

Football cannot be accepted in the US because you're shit it at it

Mabie Yes. Mabie Not. It depends on how suck-able we are at it.
Posted by Master_Funk

You could also ask why the rest of the world doesn't give a fuck about american sports.

I think a major reason why its not popular is because there is only one break in the whole match, and US television networks have only one opportunity to show their shitty commercials, unlike american sports where you have a break every 5 minutes.

Posted by MooseyMcMan

Soccer's a real sport. It's just boring, and fun to make fun of.  
 
USA! USA! USA! USA! 

Edited by Adamsons
@shinigami420 said:

@MikeGosot said:

@EuanDewar said:

@billnyethesciencepie said:

Its because there usually 2 goals a game through the entire 3 hours Its boring as FUCK

3 hours? What?

Posted by shinigami420

@CL60:

Posted by S0ndor

I believe "Soccer" is not a hit in the US because you can't play a commercial every few minutes. Also, the atrocious vuvuzela was introduced in South Africa and I give thanks to the gods everyday for that fact that it stayed the fuck in Africa after the championship was done.

Posted by shinigami420

@Adamsons said:

@shinigami420 said:

@MikeGosot said:

@EuanDewar said:

@billnyethesciencepie said:

Its because there usually 2 goals a game through the entire 3 hours Its boring as FUCK

3 hours? What?

Edited by PenguinDust
@CL60 said:

@PenguinDust said:

Americans are only interested in sports we invented.  Baseball, basketball, American football.  End story.
Technically Canada made basketball, the Canadian that made it just moved to the US when he made it.
Americans aren't interesting in confusing facts or technical truths, either. ;-)   We like NASCAR.  All left turns.
Posted by billnyethesciencepie

To everyone quoting me: 
 
I know a soccer games 90 minutes 
 
but with the whiniest players ive ever seen in a sport, it extends the length to at least twice that

Edited by TobbRobb
@Adamsons said:

@shinigami420 said:

@MikeGosot said:

@EuanDewar said:

@billnyethesciencepie said:

Its because there usually 2 goals a game through the entire 3 hours Its boring as FUCK

3 hours? What?

It's American hours, 90 european minutes=3 american hours. DERP
 
Also we don't take any complaints about "longwinded and boring" from the country who watches nascar.
Posted by TotalEklypse

Because you can't hit anyone. Any game that you can not hit someone is not a sport. Soccer is just rugby for pussies. Then you get the crybabies whining how "he tripped me" yet he obviously didn't get tripped. Plus I mean come on, not using your hands in a game like that just reminds me of a row of girls doing Irish folk dancing.

Posted by sopranosfan

I like soccer except for the falling down and grabbing a limb every time somebody runs by.  I think Chris Bosh would make an excellent soccer player on that front.  

Posted by billnyethesciencepie
@TobbRobb said:
@Adamsons said:

@shinigami420 said:

@MikeGosot said:

@EuanDewar said:

@billnyethesciencepie said:

Its because there usually 2 goals a game through the entire 3 hours Its boring as FUCK

3 hours? What?

It's American hours, 90 european minutes=3 american hours. DERP  Also we don't take any complaints about "longwinded and boring" from the country who watches nascar.
at least there are legitimate moments of excitement in Nascar.
Posted by Extreme_Popcorn

@Hardgamer said:

@Buck_Sexington said:

Football cannot be accepted in the US because you're shit it at it

Mabie Yes. Mabie Not. It depends on how suck-able we are at it.

You as suck-able at football as you are at spelling.

Posted by Toms115

football is for pussies i play baseball like a real man

Posted by BraveToaster

The typing in the OP isn't terrible. It's as if Hardgamer took that drug from that Bradley Cooper movie and his grammar improved.

Posted by billnyethesciencepie
@Axxol: your gamertag is great
Posted by NickL

The reason we dislike soccer is because we can't watch commercials every few minutes? Congratulations, that's the dumbest thing I have read this week!

As an American, I love soccer. I hate basketball and baseball, everyone has different tastes.

Also, lol at the guy saying soccer is three hours long.

Posted by TobbRobb
@billnyethesciencepie: Yeah I always get goosebumps at the fifth of threehundred left turns.
Posted by Menseguez
@PenguinDust: basketball was invented by a Canadian. Just saying.
 
I think in american sports the most exciting part of a game is when someone scores. As a result the sports are designed to contain as many of these moments as possible leading to highers scoresw. So when an average american sporting fan looks at a soccer score they automatically assume that it is boring because there were only a couple of goals scored.
For me personally soccer isn't about the goals, it's about the play in general. I've seen some extremely exiting 0-0 draws and some high socring games that weren't so exciting.
Posted by BraveToaster
@billnyethesciencepie said:
@Axxol: your gamertag is great
Thanks.
Posted by Mikemcn

If the US ever wins the World Cup, soccer will catch on pretty quick, i gurantee it.

Posted by NickL

@billnyethesciencepie said:

To everyone quoting me: I know a soccer games 90 minutes but with the whiniest players ive ever seen in a sport, it extends the length to at least twice that

You are thinking of soccer players from latin america, and yes, I agree, fuck those whiny bitches.

European players don't whine nearly as much, if someone hits you, you don't lay on the ground and whine, you go hit them back.

That's what real soccer is, fuck latin american soccer.

Posted by Sin4profit

Americans like to be "World Champions" ...we'll be damned if we're going to let other members of the world take that away from us by playing international sports.

Posted by McShank

@shinigami420 said:

omg... i cant stop laughing because of the truth of it all >.< Sparta is what started it all! But on to soccer, my boss is in love with soccer, if he could he would fuck a soccer ball. I run a pizza shop for him but whenever he comes in the TV goes to soccer. doesn't matter whether it was a new game, a old game or just some random show on the soccer channel like *Footballs next big star* which is full of reject highschool kids who cant find a real job so they go on tv to show the skills they learned while skipping school just to be sent home crying in their parents arms. I never disliked soccer till this job.. A year of that channel has made me hate the sport so much that i wish our soccer stadium would burn down so i can laugh at the crying faces. To many times have i seen some guy run and look back to see the ref stareing at him to just trip over his own feet and grab his knee like someone tripped him then when no one gives a fuck he just gets up like nothing ever happened.. do soccer players have no shame? Do teams suck so fucking much they have to pretend to be hurt to try and win? This is why i hate soccer... To many fucking rejects who cant kick the ball in the net having to resort to cheating. At least in American football if someone is on the ground in pain they ARE in pain, not "Oh no he tripped me, my knee hurts so badly" while the slowmo replay shows them never touching their knee when they fall. what a bunch of pussies.

Posted by MikeGosot
@billnyethesciencepie said:
@TobbRobb said:
@Adamsons said:

@shinigami420 said:

@MikeGosot said:

@EuanDewar said:

@billnyethesciencepie said:

Its because there usually 2 goals a game through the entire 3 hours Its boring as FUCK

3 hours? What?

It's American hours, 90 european minutes=3 american hours. DERP  Also we don't take any complaints about "longwinded and boring" from the country who watches nascar.
at least there are legitimate moments of excitement in Nascar.
That reminds me... Do you Americans watch F1? That's kinda ignorant of my part, i know, but i got curious about this.
Posted by McShank

@MikeGosot: I watch everything but nascar >.<

Posted by BiffMcBlumpkin
@Hardgamer said:
 Americans would rather watch a bunch of 300+ lb. linemen crushing people than watch a bunch of slender fellows in short pants and high stockings running lithely over the grass. 


You just described the backyard of Snider's dreams.
Posted by shinigami420

@MikeGosot said:

@billnyethesciencepie said:
@TobbRobb said:
@Adamsons said:

@shinigami420 said:

@MikeGosot said:

@EuanDewar said:

@billnyethesciencepie said:

Its because there usually 2 goals a game through the entire 3 hours Its boring as FUCK

3 hours? What?

It's American hours, 90 european minutes=3 american hours. DERP Also we don't take any complaints about "longwinded and boring" from the country who watches nascar.
at least there are legitimate moments of excitement in Nascar.
That reminds me... Do you Americans watch F1? That's kinda ignorant of my part, i know, but i got curious about this.
Posted by Video_Game_King

I thought this was the reason why soccer can't take off in America:
 

Posted by Hunkulese

@Hardgamer: Americans watch what they're told to watch. Soccer will never be heavily promoted by national tv networks because they can't take commercial breaks.

Posted by MikeGosot
@NickL said:

@billnyethesciencepie said:

To everyone quoting me: I know a soccer games 90 minutes but with the whiniest players ive ever seen in a sport, it extends the length to at least twice that

You are thinking of soccer players from latin america, and yes, I agree, fuck those whiny bitches.

European players don't whine nearly as much, if someone hits you, you don't lay on the ground and whine, you go hit them back.

That's what real soccer is, fuck latin american soccer.

Oh man, you're wrong in so many levels.
Posted by TheVeteran13

I personally don't like soccer because of the players, they strike me as the biggest divas out of any sport

Edited by McBEEF

Football or 'soccer' i find is reeeally boring to watch but fun to play with your mates. 
 
Rugby is the best sport ever. American Football is just so damn slow.

Posted by Evilv6
@NickL: I don't see how Latin American football players whine more than European players, have you seen a Barça match? Anyways, lol indeed at the 3 hours games guy

Posted by shinigami420
Posted by FreakAche

Soccer doesn't make sense. It's like hockey, except terrible.

Posted by Zabant
@PenguinDust said:
Americans are only interested in sports we invented.  Baseball, basketball, American football.  End story.
I got some news for you....