HH's forum posts

#1 Edited by HH (609 posts) -

i'm back to GTA V. singleplayer only. picking up halfway through my 2nd run, hundred percenting this one, and I'm in no hurry.

i can't get enough of the ambience, the time between missions, just roaming around, taking in the sights and sounds, the tangible feel of Michael Mann's 'Heat'.

i'll be picking up the next-gen version no doubt, and running a 3rd, even longer, and more precise playthrough.

#2 Edited by HH (609 posts) -

@azrailx: hey man, if you've got examples please provide, i've already conceded planescape's claim, although i don't think it's as rightful as TLOU's. and don't make the mistake of thinking literature means good, i'm not talking about good stories, the lord of the rings is a great story, but it's not relevant to the world we live in, and therefore you won't find it on university curriculums. if game history is brimming with stories that are relevant that I don't know about, and there are no reasons why it should be really, please enlighten me.

calling me a console pleb was a really ignorant opener by the way, i bought planescape when it came out.

#3 Edited by HH (609 posts) -
@jeust said:

I say the relevancy depends on both the person and the moment they live in. But I see your point, still to me that pales in comparison with other problems. Especially because we created this world. It was born from our thoughts, born from our flaws, and without addressing those flaws do we have a chance to make the world a better place? To some extent possibly... but that extent is limited.

the best chance we have to make the world a better place could very well be in the aftermath of a crisis like the infrastructure meltdown we see in the Last of Us. Considering there seems to be plenty of people out there willing it to happen, even for the right reasons, it's a scary thought.

#4 Edited by HH (609 posts) -
@jeust said:

I disagree, Well did you play Planescape Torment? That game has arguably the best story out of any video game.

It's so good that there is the novelized version of the dialogue.

I'll leave you with a snipet of the great writting:

At what point does the I get separated from the we? At what point am I freed of the shackles of the actions of these other incarnations? At what point am I allowed to be me, without the weight of these past lives?

you may be right, i didn't get far enough in that game to tell, and by the above quote that game could well have existential themes that have an impact on the player, but are they as relevant as the central theme of TLOU?

Last of Us draws a direct line to all the disenfranchised members of our own society, disenfranchised by the way our society is run from the top down, all the school shooters that pervade the news these days, these are a symptom of our way of life, this is a real problem, people who develop nothing but resentment for the world, in response to how they are treated by others, and people who actually see harm in new life - a population spiralling out of control, in the face of an energy crisis that no-one has an answer for, what's going to happen when the oil runs out? an end to globalization? a complete dependance on locally grown food? a huge population decline? does it even make sense to save every life? are we making the underlying problem worse? are we too sympathetic now to even stop ourselves? are we compelled to save every life no-matter the consequences? no movie or book i've come across has addressed this pressing issue, but TLOU did it superbly.

#5 Edited by HH (609 posts) -

@video_game_king said:

@hh said:

@video_game_king: "it completely goes against previously established moods for no good reason."

this makes no sense. it's dumb.

How does it not make any sense? The game had, until that point, established a morally ambiguous world wherein people were more or less trying to live their lives. In addition, Joel was a thoroughly ordinary person in this world; there was nothing to set him apart. The ending abandons both of these premises in favor of a morally clear cut world. We're now supposed to side with Joel's reckless heroics and his "screw your rules, I'm doing what's right" mindset. In that sense, it completely goes against previously established moods. (I'd also mention a major plot problem, but theme is more my issue.)

Also, I might point out the irony of implicitly calling me an idiot ("wasted on gamers") while your own arguments are literally nothing more than calling my position "dumb."

you may have missed what i said earlier in the thread -

"it's the perfect book-end for his daughter getting shot at the start. it's an iron rod that the story - joel's struggle with his newfound responsibility - is built around, and he makes the choice that the state dictated at the beginning by shooting his daughter and ripping his heart out."

this betrayal sets joel apart, and makes him the wrong person for the fireflies' job.

and there is nothing morally clear cut about the ending, we are not supposed to side with joel's decision, we are supposed to observe it, and see it for what it is - entirely possible, likely even. that's all.

and you haven't convinced me at all that there's even a basis for your argument that it goes against anything that comes before.

#6 Posted by HH (609 posts) -

@video_game_king: "it completely goes against previously established moods for no good reason."

this makes no sense. it's dumb.

#7 Edited by HH (609 posts) -
#8 Edited by HH (609 posts) -

@video_game_king: no it doesn't, at all. it's the perfect book-end for his daughter getting shot at the start. it's an iron rod that the story - joel's struggle with his newfound responsibility - is built around, and he makes the choice that the state dictated at the beginning by shooting his daughter and ripping his heart out.

*sigh*

Joel's dilemma is the only literature-worthy piece of writing games have ever seen, and are likely to see for a very long time. Too bad it's wasted on gamers.

#9 Edited by HH (609 posts) -

@korolev said:

From what I could gather, the infection was winning - the quarantine zones were failing, resources were scarce and the remnants of the US military were running out of personnel. The game heavily implies that humanity is in severe danger of going extinct - the economy was so run down that they were going to run out of resources that enabled the quarantine zones to be maintained.

Even if there was no guarantee the cure could work, a shot is a shot. All of humanity's future was riding on this. Joel made the wrong choice - an understandable choice, yes, but the wrong one.

hold on.

if he waited until ellie was older, when the existing power structure had crumbled and the military was gone once and for all, they could then have made the decision to proceed with the cure, giving humanity a better chance to start from scratch and avoid all those corrupt systems.

what's wrong about that? it is, in fact, the right choice. right?

also, @notdavid - "humanity as portrayed in the game" - like it's any different from actual humanity. don't you see the corporate state in effect? don't you see how ruthless and corrupt and heartless it is? this is why joel's dilemma works so well, cos it's entirely relevant to the world we live in.

countless people are as alienated as joel is, moreso even, in our world, and would probably condemn the current system to ruin rather than save it. just because you don't feel that yourself doesn't mean you shouldn't try to understand that very prevalent point of view.

#10 Posted by HH (609 posts) -

Joel was so alienated by the corporate state / human power structures, because of what they did to his daughter, that he saw no sense in reinvigorating the human population, especially at the expense of Ellie.

makes sense to me, I can sympathize, he's not a piece of shit at all, he's a practical dude.