HistoryInRust's forum posts

#1 Edited by HistoryInRust (6397 posts) -

@geraltitude said:
You need to think clearly about:

- when to attack

- when to dodge

- when to stun

- when to counter

- when to run the hell away!

Of these, as in the Arkham games, dodging is far and away the most important. A fair amount of the enemies in this game don't let you dodge, but you can control your dodge with the left thumbstick. There's no shame in running to spare your own life, and no further shame in running just far enough to clamber up a spire and begin raining ghost-arrows on the enemies you can weed out.

Get comfortable using your environment. Breaking line of sight is so helpful.

More importantly--this part of the game, where you're tasked with wiping out the first four Warchiefs, is a serious roadblock. It's a substantial step up in difficulty from what you've seen thus far, and, ironically, just past this is the point where you'll receive some powers that make the rest of the game kind of a joke. I wouldn't go after the Warchiefs nearest the southern part of the map until you're good and ready, or at least until you've thinned out their ranks of bodyguards.

#2 Posted by HistoryInRust (6397 posts) -

Bow before ownage.

#3 Edited by HistoryInRust (6397 posts) -

@skyrider said:

@historyinrust said:

If they're going to push Roman the way it seems like they are, they really need to closely consider his gimmick. I like Roman a lot. But he's very green and he comes off appearing very scripted. And apart from his look--which is more or less the most refined thing he has going for him--there isn't much to his act. I wish Creative would sit down with him and seriously chisel out some anchor to his character. Is he cocky? Should he be this stolid Goldberg-style squasher? Can he/should he be more outwardly emotive and intense?

What I want from Roman is something personal and intangible to look forward to. He was at his best when he was wordlessly leveling fools as part of the Shield. The question is how do you best evolve that, especially as he sits on the cusp of what is, presumably, a world title push.

Hilariously, Reigns should essentially be Baron Corbin. He should cut one last promo effectively saying "I'm done talking, I'm here to beat people up." and then proceed to smash fools. That's it. Roman has a great look and aura about him right up until he opens his mouth and starts making that weird face. He can't talk like Austin, or even Taker in his American Badass gimmick, so if he's going to be a mega-badass like they want him to he needs to skip the "telling us what he's going to do part" and just do it. It shouldn't be Roman Reigns making threats, it should be Roman Reigns suddenly coming out through the crowd to murder you because you dun goofed, kid.

'Ey. You talkin' to me?

But, yes. You nailed it. Saw someone suggest that Heyman jump ship from Brock to Reigns if the time comes for a heel-turn, providing Roman a canny mouthpiece to cover his prominent weakness. Thought that was an interesting suggestion. But I agree 100%. He has this potential to be a Rock/Goldberg hybrid. I'm hoping at some point WWE makes good on that promise.

#4 Posted by HistoryInRust (6397 posts) -

@victork said:

I just recently went back and played through this game after finishing it once more than three years ago. It is still very good. I love the setting, the varied cases and cool characters.

It is sad to think that this game will probably never get a sequel.

Los Angeles was great, but i also think that Miami in the 1980s (Yes, very much a setting similar to Miami Vice which we all love.) would suit this style of game. Or perhaps San Fransisco in the 70s, or maybe Chicago in the 50s or 60s. Even the 90s are by know an era that would be fun to go back to, so I say New York in that time period as well. But there are so many cities, countries and possibilities!

What kind of city and era would you like a possible sequel to take place?

Have you tried the recent Sherlock Holmes: Crimes and Punishment? While it doesn't really offer the face-detail of L.A. Noire, or the beloved adherence to setting and place, it really scratches that mystery-solving itch in a pretty cool, sometimes singular way.

#5 Posted by HistoryInRust (6397 posts) -

If they're going to push Roman the way it seems like they are, they really need to closely consider his gimmick. I like Roman a lot. But he's very green and he comes off appearing very scripted. And apart from his look--which is more or less the most refined thing he has going for him--there isn't much to his act. I wish Creative would sit down with him and seriously chisel out some anchor to his character. Is he cocky? Should he be this stolid Goldberg-style squasher? Can he/should he be more outwardly emotive and intense?

What I want from Roman is something personal and intangible to look forward to. He was at his best when he was wordlessly leveling fools as part of the Shield. The question is how do you best evolve that, especially as he sits on the cusp of what is, presumably, a world title push.

#6 Posted by HistoryInRust (6397 posts) -

Favorite game of the year. It can be frustrating and tiring, but it's an incredible experience.

#7 Posted by HistoryInRust (6397 posts) -

You're totally right. The Nemesis system is the best supplementary wrinkle we came away with in 2014. By, like, a mile.

In fact, Shadow of Mordor kind of sucked the wind out of my sails concerning Arkham Knight. I don't think I want just another Batman game now. Or just another Assassin's Creed game. Suddenly the templates have been run dry and there's nothing interesting about the same kind of open world inside those respective frameworks. The Nemesis system adds that much more activity to the game world.

It isn't perfect. And Shadow of Mordor certainly isn't. But the potential for the system in future games is immense.

#8 Posted by HistoryInRust (6397 posts) -

No.

#9 Posted by HistoryInRust (6397 posts) -

I hate encouraging remasters like this, but I'd totally return to the Mass Effect trilogy or Skyrim on a current-gen platform.