HistoryInRust's forum posts

#1 Posted by HistoryInRust (6321 posts) -

@historyinrust said:

@ll_exile_ll said:

@t_wester said:

TEN YEAR PLAN FOKS

There might be some story down the line, but will there be enough that care at that point?

I know it will take a hell of a lot to make me care about any of the Destiny fiction going forward. I love story in games, but at this point my main concern for the future of this series is having enough to actually do in the games to sustain more than a couple of weeks of play time.

I wonder how many are like me. In that we're completely the opposite.

The thing I want most from Destiny, from that world, is a really interesting narrative. Like, they have this kind of complex world, and they've established some ground rules about the allegiances of the different factions, even if those ground rules are really--really--vague at the moment.

Some manner of space intrigue is exactly what would get me to care way more about the proceedings of the game. Destiny has significant problems beyond its narrative, of course. The mission design is just completely flaccid. But, even still, I've put in some sixty hours and will likely devote one or two-dozen more to the game. Even if it's Halo Extended Fiction-level nonsense, it'd still be something.

Well, I was certainly disappointed by the lackluster story and I'd be absolutely delighted if the fiction became something I cared about as the series progressed, but I guess at this point I've enjoyed the core gameplay so much that really what I want most out of the series, for now at least, is more stuff to do. The fact that the parts of the game with the least amount story (raid, crucible, and strikes) are what I've enjoyed most about the game is largely the source of these feelings.

Completely agree.

#2 Edited by HistoryInRust (6321 posts) -

@sarahsdad: No need to finish the story.

This is why it's useful to store any Purple Gear not fitted for your primary class in the Vault. The second another character hits 20 they can begin using Light-boosting gear.

#3 Posted by HistoryInRust (6321 posts) -

@t_wester said:

TEN YEAR PLAN FOKS

There might be some story down the line, but will there be enough that care at that point?

I know it will take a hell of a lot to make me care about any of the Destiny fiction going forward. I love story in games, but at this point my main concern for the future of this series is having enough to actually do in the games to sustain more than a couple of weeks of play time.

I wonder how many are like me. In that we're completely the opposite.

The thing I want most from Destiny, from that world, is a really interesting narrative. Like, they have this kind of complex world, and they've established some ground rules about the allegiances of the different factions, even if those ground rules are really--really--vague at the moment.

Some manner of space intrigue is exactly what would get me to care way more about the proceedings of the game. Destiny has significant problems beyond its narrative, of course. The mission design is just completely flaccid. But, even still, I've put in some sixty hours and will likely devote one or two-dozen more to the game. Even if it's Halo Extended Fiction-level nonsense, it'd still be something.

#4 Edited by HistoryInRust (6321 posts) -

Can't get behind a lot of the criticisms in the Polygon review, especially when, in respect to those criticisms, a majority of the reviews have cited exactly the opposite. But it's nice to see Horizon getting a warm reception everywhere in spite of that.

This is my most anticipated game of the year. Can't wait to finally sit down with it in full.

#5 Edited by HistoryInRust (6321 posts) -

These are pretty clearly not ways Bungie intended the game to be played, but these are all indicative of larger, more complicated issues. The kind you can't patch out. The players are responding in their play to the way the world and the game treats them.

@tennmuerti said:

after you've run the same strike 20+ times, there is no difference to doing that or just shooting the same cave entrance

Exactly this, to some extent. Either you and some pals are dumping ammo into Phogoth from a location where he can't hit you, or you and some pals are dumping ammo into a cave from a location where the spawns can't hit you. The difference--and it is the difference--is that you aren't getting anything of value from Phogoth.

I don't think anyone has a problem with farming boss runs. Or running Strikes. Or pushing into the Vault of Glass or the Nightfall missions. Problem is, the game doesn't accommodate or reward this in any way. It's too hard to get a group together, and the time investment isn't worth it.

#6 Posted by HistoryInRust (6321 posts) -

That final celebration scene is the most bizarre thing. I didn't really understand what was being celebrated. I destroyed some black heart thing that didn't seem like a big deal (just another inconsequential boss in the long succession of boss things to kill), then people were super happy. Way more happy then they were about all my previous efforts. It feels like Bungie playtested the final sequence, was given the response of 'that doesn't feel like an ending,' then haphazardly threw together the most inoffensive and generic closing to a piece of action-oriented narrative.

Now excuse me while I log into bungie.net to see if I can fumble around with these dumb cards to contextualize why I shot some robot things a bunch of times.

It certainly could've used more Ewok music.

#7 Posted by HistoryInRust (6321 posts) -

@historyinrust said:

@boojr said:

why are we still talking about this game....it was a let down (almost brought a ps4) and in a few years will be forgotten unless they just keep throwing money at it to keep it alive.... T__T

Because the ways in which it is a let down, and the fact that--despite its myriad flaws--it can still command so much attention from its players, are completely fucking fascinating.

How about because a bunch of people actually like it a lot? I, for one, love the shit out of it. Sure, the variety in content is lacking and the story is bad but the content that's actually there is incredibly fun to play. The multiplayer is great and rewarding in a way I haven't felt since modern warfare 2. I'm really looking forward to trying out that raid and so is a lot of people. That's why we're still talking about destiny.

Totally. And I completely agree.

But it's more than that at some point. It's still this surprisingly confounding thing that no one seems to truly understand on any level. Destiny carries a certain magic with it. And I think the part everyone is still circling around is how a game so flawed in so many aspects can be so riveting.

#8 Edited by HistoryInRust (6321 posts) -

@boojr said:

why are we still talking about this game....it was a let down (almost brought a ps4) and in a few years will be forgotten unless they just keep throwing money at it to keep it alive.... T__T

Because the ways in which it is a let down, and the fact that--despite its myriad flaws--it can still command so much attention from its players, are completely fucking fascinating.

#9 Edited by HistoryInRust (6321 posts) -

@neocalypso said:

It's pretty god damned annoying that nobody seems to be able to convey what actually makes these stupid raids so hard. They are always so pointlessly vague about it when it's just a shooter so It can't really be all that complicated.

I don't know that I'm the person to be answering this, since I've neither participated in the Vault of Glass nor watched a single playthrough from front to back.

But I did catch some of it on stream last night.

Saddle up. This could be a long--and completely inaccurate--post.

---

It looked like, matter of factly, that the raid's difficulty is dictated by two factors:

1) The number of moving parts in the combat scenarios.

2) DPS -- that is, the DPS typhoon the bosses and infinite mobs can dole out + the relative lack of damage players do to both of those entities.

Concerning Point 1: Players (in the scenario I witnessed) aren't fighting a boss and squads of regular enemies in a simple shoot-em-up. The boss has a shield that can only be deactivated (for a few seconds at a time) with a raid-specific weapon. Some kind of sword. The player wielding the sword can only deactivate the boss's defenses if they have built up their super ability, something that regenerates once every few minutes, or more quickly if Orbs of Light are dropped when other supers nearby are used.

When the shield is deactivated, it only remains so for a couple beats. This is more or less Point 2 in totality--players don't hurt the boss very much, and when they do, they can't hurt it for more than a few breathless moments every few minutes. The high-level enemies and boss, however, can leave an entire team in cinders with one or a few well-placed attacks, or as a result of lapses of judgment/coordination on the part of the team.

Meanwhile, as the team struggles in this war of attrition, entities called Oracles spawn around the boss room, which is large and intricate. The Oracles generate a team-wide debuff that are removed by being within close proximity to a point very close to the boss location. Basically directly underneath the boss itself.

As the players fight against these Oracles and the boss and the mobs coming in endless droves, the boss will trap individual players inside red globes. These globes can only be destroyed by another player, and will kill those trapped inside if not destroyed promptly. I'm talking, like, within a matter of seconds. While inside the globe, the player can still fire their weapons, but cannot move and will still suffer damage from enemy fire. Nearer to the end of the battle, multiple players will be caged inside globes at once.

So, the raid requires a lot of communication simply because there are numerous situations that offer incredibly brief actionable windows. If you don't have a complete and total awareness of the situation, you will miss an opportunity. And that missed opportunity will either prolong an already protracted encounter, leading to odds being further and further stacked against the player team, or will lead to one or more players being killed instantaneously.

And I think what I saw was just the first of three major encounters.

Ultimately, the raid presents as a ferociously-involved combat puzzle. Bungie's penchant for having players incorporate and change engagement strategies in real time (e.g., needing the right gun for the right enemy, flanking and double teaming when necessary) gets turned up to its highest possible zenith.

It struck me as uncontrolled bedlam in a game that, otherwise, doesn't really condition its players to prepare for it.

#10 Posted by HistoryInRust (6321 posts) -

I will really be interested to see how full on Motorsport-level tuning in this influences the balance of the multiplayer experience. Horizon 1 was really slick because Playground Games so neatly strode the line between purchasing upgrades for cars and player skill.

Those Forza Motorsport games are basically unplayable online for someone like me who knows not the first thing about tuning cars. People with extremely granular knowledge can push cars beyond realistic or competitive limits to the point where it isn't fun to even play with them. Hoping Horizon doesn't fall prey to that.