Hunter5024's forum posts

#1 Posted by Hunter5024 (6448 posts) -

@karkarov said:
@hunter5024 said:

But isn't that sort of a self fulfilling prophecy? How can they expect international audiences to spend more on anime if anime isn't produced with international audiences in mind at all? Also Hollywood blockbusters are absolutely made to have appeal outside of the United States, domestic box office is rapidly becoming less and less important.

To put it a little more bluntly than the other poster.... it isn't a self fulfilling prophecy because you are making a mistake. You are assuming they want to sell to an international audience, they don't. Most Anime productions companies literally do not care, even a little, if their show is ever aired outside Japan. If they get some licensing deal from someone that's just considered icing on the cake, it is not something they see or consider to be a legitimate venue for profit. You need to realize anime is just like American tv. Beavis and Butthead for example, do you think that show was ever meant to be broadcast outside of America? Do you think the shows creators stopped to think if it would gain traction with viewers in Korea? Of course not.

These are Japanese tv shows you are talking about. If you don't think Americans should be making American tv with Japanese audiences in mind (and they shouldn't) then don't ask Japanese production companies to make Japanese tv with Americans in mind.

That's exactly what I'm criticizing though. I get that they don't care, but that's a bad attitude to have. Obviously any artistic company is out to create something they feel proud of, but they're definitely out to make money too and the way every popular anime gets merchandised to hell is a testament to that. If they gave some consideration to the way their anime is localized and distributed across the world then they could potentially be making a hell of a lot more money. It wouldn't just be good for the companies, it would be good for the country.

Also in every English speaking country you're going to find plenty of American TV. Trying to claim the U.S. has the same attitude as Japan about this stuff simply isn't true at all. The primary obstacle to working internationally is language, and Japan's in a favorable position for this, because a great deal of their television is animated, and dubbing that is way less noticeable than live action stuff. I'm sure there were plenty of american kids who had no idea Pokemon or Dragon Ball Z were even from Japan. Obviously America has some animated stuff too, but unlike Japan almost all of America's animated shows are comedies, and those are much harder to translate because comedy relies so much on culture and often language.

#2 Edited by Hunter5024 (6448 posts) -

I finished Kill La Kill a couple weeks ago. I'm pretty sure that show was cool. It's one of the few anime I actually found funny, the music is incredible, the story was sort of a roller coaster of crazy nonsense that didn't take itself seriously enough to screw anything up (except when it occasionally did). The second half of the series didn't grab me the same way the first did, I think the action had grown a little stale by then, and they started cutting more and more corners with the animation. If they'd cut out a few episodes, and/or gone 10 percent further with some of the character development then I think this could've been something really awesome.

The last thing I expected was that the nudity would get in the way of my enjoyment, because normally I do not give a shit, but man, even though it made sense for the story I constantly felt like Satsuki and Ryuuko would be a lot cooler with more clothes on. Maybe there was some commentary that went right over my head, or it just felt like they were trying to have their cake and eat it too. I'm probably thinking about it too much, but I just didn't think they needed it. Still pretty dope show I think??

#3 Posted by Hunter5024 (6448 posts) -

Before I found out that he passed, I saw a tribute post for him on Facebook, and it probably says a lot about Lee that it didn't occur to me there might be a particular reason for my friend to post it. I was just like "Yeah, that dude is fucking awesome."

#4 Posted by Hunter5024 (6448 posts) -

@karkarov said:
@jiggajoe14 said:

Yeah I don't think anime is exempt from criticism at all. I do wonder, however, if there will be more of a push to make it more accessible or to engage wider audiences with both the medium and academic criticism. Will companies be willing to bring more shows over to the west and try to engage a mass audience with them (like say the Aria series or Mushishi or Usagi Drop....basically anything outside the standard shounen stuff you would see on a Toonami)? I'm not surprised that there is academic discourse going on right now, but how many people are interested in it? Not a lot it seems. And then there are childish viewpoints that anime is for childish, tentacle loving miscreants to deal with to make that discourse meaningful...at least to me.

No, because like many other posters already state the VAST majority of profit for an anime production company comes from Japan. We aren't talking like a 60/40 split either, it is more like 85/15 or 90/10. There is little to no reason to consider a western audience when they make anime. Just like the guys who made Jurrassic World didn't consider an eastern audience while they were making that.

But isn't that sort of a self fulfilling prophecy? How can they expect international audiences to spend more on anime if anime isn't produced with international audiences in mind at all? Also Hollywood blockbusters are absolutely made to have appeal outside of the United States, domestic box office is rapidly becoming less and less important.

#5 Posted by Hunter5024 (6448 posts) -

I really appreciate when I can listen to a podcast while playing a game.

#6 Posted by Hunter5024 (6448 posts) -

For sure! I've really loved a lot of the games I've played and there's a fat list of games I haven't even had time for yet. 2016 is looking pretty good too. It's very appreciated because last year was probably the worst year for games since I started keeping track.

#7 Posted by Hunter5024 (6448 posts) -

@hunter5024 said:
@guanophobic said:

Did you watch the end of it? Why would you want to go through that?

I've seen the 19 episodes that are released on Youtube. There were a lot of low points like the layoffs, the reactions after they split the game, and the delays, but there were high points too, like when they debuted the trailer, and when they released act 1. There's clearly a lot of struggling and suffering that goes into developing a game, but at the end of the day they have something they can point to and say "I helped make that." I think for me that would be worth working myself sick and spending nights in an office. But everybody's going to have different ideas about what they want their job to be, and I could see that stuff being deal breakers for some.

Hm, I'm wondering if we're talking about the same type of sick here? I'm not just talking about a common cold (which in this case is a symptom of something way bigger).

Have you ever been subjected to that type of stress for such a long time? I'm wondering if this type of glamorization of the industry still is hurting it, as employers can just hire new people to burn out instead of saying no to that type of crunch. Is having "pride of your work" worth it, when you can work half as much in other industries, with usually way higher pay? And last way longer?

Probably the busiest I've ever been was a couple years ago when I decided to participate in National Novel Writing Month during my work's busy season while also attending college. During that time I literally had no free time, it was all devoted to working, school, writing, or sleep (and probably not enough of the last). But I wasn't stressed because I was happy to be making something and at the end of the month I had something I could show for it. When I think back on the times in my life I was most stressed out, it wasn't because of how much I was working, it was because of what I was working on, like school subjects I had no interest in. So for me personally I think what's most important is working on something that matters to me, because when I have that, it doesn't feel as much like work. I would take that over easier hours and better pay, because to me 8 hours a day in a job that means nothing to me feels like a soul crushing waste.

Like I said though, I think everybody's different. I know a lot of people are happy to have jobs that allow them to live a better life outside of work, but I know myself and I know that I wouldn't be happy that way. I'm not trying to glamorize it, obviously it would be horrible for most people, and maybe its bad for the industry as a whole that people like me exist, but I don't think that's going to change any time soon.

#8 Posted by Hunter5024 (6448 posts) -

I'm reading The Last Wish right now so I voted for that.

#9 Edited by Hunter5024 (6448 posts) -

When I was younger big ass RPG's were all I played, and I still love games like that, but no matter how much I enjoy them, I'd much rather play six ten hour games than one sixty hour game. So now I rarely play more than a couple a year, and I'm always exhausted when I'm done with them. Also I almost never replay games.

It's not all bad though. I would say my taste is more varied than it's ever been before.

#10 Posted by Hunter5024 (6448 posts) -

@hunter5024 said:
@guanophobic said:

This. Seeing the end of the Double Fine Adventure series confirmed what I'd heard about working in the gaming industry. No way in hell would I want to work myself sick like that.

Really? When I watched it I had exactly the opposite reaction. I just wanted to be there.

Did you watch the end of it? Why would you want to go through that?

I've seen the 19 episodes that are released on Youtube. There were a lot of low points like the layoffs, the reactions after they split the game, and the delays, but there were high points too, like when they debuted the trailer, and when they released act 1. There's clearly a lot of struggling and suffering that goes into developing a game, but at the end of the day they have something they can point to and say "I helped make that." I think for me that would be worth working myself sick and spending nights in an office. But everybody's going to have different ideas about what they want their job to be, and I could see that stuff being deal breakers for some.