Icemael's forum posts

#1 Posted by Icemael (6315 posts) -

http://platinumgames.com/2014/06/27/character-design-pt-1-bayonetta-and-jeanne/

The keyword for Jeanne’s concept design in Bayonetta 2 is “casual.” Design started when Kamiya came up to me and said “I want to put her on a bike. Draw me a biker suit.”

Jeanne is one of Kamiya’s favorite characters, so most anything Hashimoto and I said would get shot down instantly. I just drew biker suit after biker suit until one was approved. There were actually a few more he liked, but they all maintained a relative simplicity similar to her final approved outfit.

I didn’t intend to accentuate this part of her in my concept art, but Kamiya said Jeanne looks flatter than ever. He was happy about it too, so that’s fine I guess.

#2 Posted by Icemael (6315 posts) -

http://platinumgames.com/2014/06/27/character-design-pt-1-bayonetta-and-jeanne/

The keyword for Jeanne’s concept design in Bayonetta 2 is “casual.” Design started when Kamiya came up to me and said “I want to put her on a bike. Draw me a biker suit.”

Jeanne is one of Kamiya’s favorite characters, so most anything Hashimoto and I said would get shot down instantly. I just drew biker suit after biker suit until one was approved. There were actually a few more he liked, but they all maintained a relative simplicity similar to her final approved outfit.

I didn’t intend to accentuate this part of her in my concept art, but Kamiya said Jeanne looks flatter than ever. He was happy about it too, so that’s fine I guess.

#3 Posted by Icemael (6315 posts) -

http://platinumgames.com/2014/06/27/character-design-pt-1-bayonetta-and-jeanne/

The keyword for Jeanne’s concept design in Bayonetta 2 is “casual.” Design started when Kamiya came up to me and said “I want to put her on a bike. Draw me a biker suit.”

Jeanne is one of Kamiya’s favorite characters, so most anything Hashimoto and I said would get shot down instantly. I just drew biker suit after biker suit until one was approved. There were actually a few more he liked, but they all maintained a relative simplicity similar to her final approved outfit.

I didn’t intend to accentuate this part of her in my concept art, but Kamiya said Jeanne looks flatter than ever. He was happy about it too, so that’s fine I guess.

#4 Posted by Icemael (6315 posts) -

With Bayonetta 2 and Scalebound in development and this being a licensed download-only game, I hardly think it's being handled by Platinum's finest. And that screenshot looks terrible. So I'm not really expecting this to be very good.

#5 Posted by Icemael (6315 posts) -

Yes, there is nothing more enthralling than a world randomly generated with algorithms rather than hand-made by human beings using taste and imagination (everyone knows computer programs are the best game designers). Especially when it appears there is nothing more to do than aimlessly fly around collecting materials and occasionally fight enemies in battles that I can only assume are utterly dull and uninteresting considering they have avoided showing or talking about the combat system beyond "you can shoot stuff". Discovering randomly generated planet #45736 and collecting the 50 units of iron on its surface will no doubt be a truly amazing and emotional experience fit only for the most sensitive and artistic of players.

#6 Posted by Icemael (6315 posts) -

Contra: Hard Corps.

#7 Edited by Icemael (6315 posts) -

Your life is fueled by your constant death: every moment of life is a moment of death. As for death in the sense of a final end to consciousness, that is something we can neither imagine nor say anything about, and which we know of only as a scientific myth. Before science, life went on after the body failed (in Elysium or Hades, in Paradise or in Hell). Only with science did these myths come to an end, but the scientific answer that has replaced them is no less mythological. The only death science knows of is that of the body, that is to say of the biological machine, which has no necessary connection to consciousness.

#8 Edited by Icemael (6315 posts) -

I don't think the developers are lying, but I do think people's expectations are ridiculous and I don't see why anyone's impressed by this. The visuals are pretty nice and that seems to be just about the only cool thing about the game. A procedurally generated galaxy is not something anyone should be excited about (especially not when coming from such a small team). Randomly generated world are boring worlds, and that's what the game's more or less guaranteed to be after you've flown around in space for an hour or two and seen a handful of planets: fucking boring as shit.

#9 Posted by Icemael (6315 posts) -

@milkman: Me, Kael, Nietzsche, Shinji Mikami etc.

#10 Posted by Icemael (6315 posts) -

It's absolutely true that racial, cultural and gender diversity has no value in itself and should never be added just for the sake of it. It must be repeated again and again: games are for pleasure and not for moralizing. Every design choice that's made for "justice" or "equality" and not to make the game more interesting and enjoyable is a corrupt, pathetic, degenerate design choice. And the same goes for criticism.

Excerpts from Pauline Kael's excellent "Trash, Art and the Movies" written in 1969:

We generally become interested in movies because we enjoy them and what we enjoy them for has little to do with what we think of as art. The movies we respond to, even in childhood, don’t have the same values as the official culture supported at school and in the middle-class home. At the movies we get low life and high life, while David Susskind and the moralistic reviewers chastise us for not patronizing what they think we should, “realistic” movies that would be good for us—like “A Raisin in the Sun,” where we could learn the lesson that a Negro family can be as dreary as a white family. Movie audiences will take a lot of garbage, but it’s pretty hard to make us queue up for pedagogy.

I’m not sure most movie reviewers consider what they honestly enjoy as being central to criticism. Some at least appear to think that that would be relying too much on their own tastes, being too personal instead of being “objective” -— relying on the ready-made terms of cultural respectability and on consensus judgment (which, to a rather shocking degree, can be arranged by publicists creating a climate of importance around a movie). Just as movie directors, as they age, hunger for what was meant by respectability in their youth, and aspire to prestigious cultural properties, so, too, the movie press longs to be elevated in terms of the cultural values of their old high schools. And so they, along with the industry, applaud ghastly “tour-de-force” performances, movies based on “distinguished” stage successes or prize-winning novels, or movies that are “worthwhile,” that make a “contribution” -— “serious” messagy movies. This often involves praise of bad movies, of dull movies, or even the praise in good movies of what was worst in them.

It applies to game criticism today just as much as it applied to movie criticism 45 years ago.