Jeust's forum posts

#1 Posted by Jeust (10644 posts) -

In her words, we couldn't be together before we learn how to be apart.

I've been there, and what you are experiencing is perfectly normal. It's the pain of growing apart from her.

From my point of view you made a terrible mistake, which was

She became the most vital part of my life.

It's good to love someone, but no one should be your reason for living, or it happens exactly what happened to you this time. You lose that someone, and feel hopeless and apathetic.

Because she was so important you grew insecure and jelous, and the relationship reached a point, where she or both of you felt it would be best to be apart.

What I say is this: you have to learn to live your life for yourself. Set goals for yourself in work, sports, hobbies. And make an effort to work on them, and put your mind in your actions. It will feel like hell for a time, barren and sterile, it will pain you tremendously, but you have to built a life for yourself, where you are the center of your life, and not someone else. Because otherwise when the center of your life is stolen, you reach this same crossroad you are in.

In my view relationships, they should be attempt by balanced human beings that despite loving the other, put the common good of both first. A relationship should be an added blessing to one's life, not the one's center of gravitation. This enables one to make the best decisions for both, even with hesitation, and find the best outcome for everyone.

Otherwise if you make of maintaining the relationship your central objective, or of a woman the center of your life, you will grow clingy, jealous, and miserable, because you don't value yourself enough, and value your partner too much. You will have very low self esteem and will do things beneath you, putting yourself always in second place. And that is a very unhealthy and unbalanced relationship, and very unstable, and will either end or will continue in an unhealthy and sick manner.

So my advice, is for you to change your goals, make a life for yourself, with goals, and the drive to accomplish them, and when you can balance your life with a girlfriend, engage in a relationship with her, or with someone else.

#2 Posted by Jeust (10644 posts) -

I get a little irked, but nothing more.

#3 Edited by Jeust (10644 posts) -

@alexw00d said:

@jeust: Exactly my problem. It wasn't hard, it was just tedious. In a game where the main pull is the atmosphere and the experience, the feeling of "oh god not this again" every time just ruined any sort of atmosphere for me.

To me it wasn't that grating, as there were plenty of relaxing moments. But I understand.

#4 Posted by Jeust (10644 posts) -

@alexw00d said:

@jeust said:

@alexw00d said:

@jeust: see that's not an opinion or a taste or whatever. Something can't be subjectively almost perfect. You can give real reasons for why you like something, just like I gave real reasons for disliking it. But I'm not going to say the game is awful, because I can't.

It is. When people say it is boring or slow, to me it is just about right. I want a game with slow pacing. The shooting to me was fine. It is a matter of taste.

There you go, those are opinions. That's all this ever needed. I enjoy slow paced games anyway, I just think Alan Wake shot itself in the foot when there was combat every 2 minutes.

But the enemy encounters were too easy. ^^

#5 Edited by Jeust (10644 posts) -

@jeust said:

@starvinggamer said:

@jeust said:

@starvinggamer said:

Not the casual market, just growing pains of a young medium as it struggles to mature, accelerated a thousandfold by the proliferation of social media.

But isn't that acceleration caused also by the expansion of the consumer market?

Consumer market yes, hence growing pains. Not the casual market specifically, though.

But it also grew greatly, and expanded the consumer base.

Sure, but I'd be surprised if there was a significant level of crossover. The type of people who got started playing Candy Crush probably aren't transitioning into Gears of War. If I had to guess, I'd imagine that it has more to do with the fact that girls who grew up playing games are turning into women who are playing/making games and that men who were playing/making games have become husbands and fathers.

That's just what I have observed from the people talking and they way they're talking. I don't have any statistics or anything.

My reasoning has as much proof as yours. I think women got more involved in gaming last generation and that is showing this generation. They got more in tune to what is happening in the market. :)

#6 Posted by Jeust (10644 posts) -

@alexw00d said:

@jeust: see that's not an opinion or a taste or whatever. Something can't be subjectively almost perfect. You can give real reasons for why you like something, just like I gave real reasons for disliking it. But I'm not going to say the game is awful, because I can't.

It is. When people say it is boring or slow, to me it is just about right. I want a game with slow pacing. The shooting to me was fine. It is a matter of taste.

#7 Edited by Jeust (10644 posts) -

@starvinggamer said:

@jeust said:

@starvinggamer said:

Not the casual market, just growing pains of a young medium as it struggles to mature, accelerated a thousandfold by the proliferation of social media.

But isn't that acceleration caused also by the expansion of the consumer market?

Consumer market yes, hence growing pains. Not the casual market specifically, though.

But it also grew greatly, and expanded the consumer base.

#8 Posted by Jeust (10644 posts) -

@extomar said:

@jeust:

It is possible that the "dynamics" have changed over the last generation. I wonder if it is more about "guys don't buy so much any more" more than "we want to sell to girls".

Yeah. I think most advocates of feminist changes are women, so it appears women are growing in the consumer base, and demanding change.

@corvak said:

Not so much the casual market, as its initial core audience growing older.

a lot of men who got into games (at least, mature games) in their teens have wives and daughters now, so they are less likely to shrug off sexist content.

Yeah, and those wifes and daughters have been introduced to video games.

#9 Posted by Jeust (10644 posts) -

Not the casual market, just growing pains of a young medium as it struggles to mature, accelerated a thousandfold by the proliferation of social media.

But isn't that acceleration caused also by the expansion of the consumer market?

#10 Posted by Jeust (10644 posts) -

Killer is Dead. It made me finally understand Suda's games aren't my cup of tea.