Lord_Punch's forum posts

#1 Posted by Lord_Punch (138 posts) -

@zfubarz said:

@lord_punch said:

@xceagle:

But at that point, the game just ends up feeling like wish fulfillment without any real conflict. Thus, all of the suspense, intrigue, and creepiness is merely contrived manipulation by the developers who aren't confident for this story to stand alone.

Why is it ok for pretty much every Book and Movie with a romantic theme to build in tension and false dread? Why is it suddenly a bad thing when a game makes you nervous of every new room you explore and then be pleasantly surprised by love and hope winning out? Using the very medium, and the typical tropes of that medium to keep you in suspense until the last possible moment? If it was all obvious and straightforward then the whole experience would be nowhere near as engaging. Anyway you're getting ragged on enough already, sorry.

Jesus that Oscar stuff is great/awful, when I got to the room behind the servants quarters, and saw the child's height markings and the toy horse in the dark room I had step away for a bit while all those little bits and pieces of that side story came together. I didn't get the Kennedy connection but it makes a lot of sense, Layering in so much depth and complexity in a side story is a hell of a thing. The marriage troubles, his drinking getting worse in the new home, his fall back job as a Tech Writer going downhill, his reaction to Sam's sexuality, it all fits together so damn well.

Hell even the fact that Sam and Terrence liked the same porn was a weird funny little touch.

The dread, tension, and suspense that I am referring to is of the thriller or horror variety. I don't think it's fair for the developers to utilize horror/thriller tropes to sell a story that has NOTHING to do with the horror or thriller genres. There can certainly be tension and suspense in romantic stories or family dramas. Even dread. Movies like Ordinary People and American Beauty utilized those wonderfully. But never in a million years would you ever place either of those films in the horror or thriller category.

I think it's disingenuous for Fullbright to lure gamers in with a dark experience which results in a story that warrants very little of that darkness. It comes across to me as them not having the confidence to tell a romantic, dramatic story, and feeling they need to dress it up as horror or suspense for it to work or to interest gamers.

And maybe they're right to be concerned in some way. I mean, despite the quality of the writing and the voice-acting being truly exceptional, the story of Sam and Lonnie is VERY slight. They get together, Lonnie might go into the Army, she doesn't, they run away together. And that's it. That's a very basic, uneventful story for us to be piecing together. Yes, we get interesting info about the activities of the other family members, but it's still not much. For me, personally, I did not feel like I received a full experience, if that makes sense to you. It's like I spent the whole game piecing together the first act, the storytellers forgot to create the rest of the story, and rushed to the end in the best way they thought they should.

That's my take, at least. Looking through the reviews and at the various forums, I seem to be in the minority on this one.

#2 Edited by Lord_Punch (138 posts) -

@xceagle:

But at that point, the game just ends up feeling like wish fulfillment without any real conflict. Thus, all of the suspense, intrigue, and creepiness is merely contrived manipulation by the developers who aren't confident for this story to stand alone.

#3 Posted by Lord_Punch (138 posts) -

@ztiworoh said:

@kevin_cogneto: See, I read that as subverting expectations. The game has all of the trappings of a horror game - the creepy mansion, the stormy night, the flickering lights. It's playing with what we think a video game will be about, in order to draw you into an incredibly un-gamey story.

I thinks that Sam's bathroom, for instance, is a perfect example of this. The tub first appears to be caked in blood, but on further examination, it's hair dye and part of one of the happiest parts of her narrative.

And it's a perfect example of how manipulative the game is, which is exactly what I was saying. It's the designers just playing gotcha. I just don't know why they felt the need to add artificial drama when there's more than enough drama in Sam & Lonnie's story as it is.

I'm with you. I really liked most of what this game offered, but I do feel like a "bait & switch" happened. At the end of the story, I'm happy for Lonnie and Sam, but I feel empty when it comes to the experience as a whole. I had a feeling of: "Oh. That's it?"

#4 Posted by Lord_Punch (138 posts) -

Drinking shitty beer, have one eye on Fast and the Furious on my TV, and the other eye on Hotline Miami on my Vita.

I think I'm a single shot of a stranger's breastmilk away from doing Ryan proud.

RIP, Mr. Davis.

#5 Posted by Lord_Punch (138 posts) -

@DeF said:

@MrBeanTroll said:

Every time I read or hear anything about this game I really want to play it yet I know I don't have the patience for average shooter gameplay.

I actually don't get what's so "average" about that part. In my opinion, it's a far better shooter than the Uncharted games and Mass Effect games are and we're all playing those regardless, right? During my time with the game I felt compelled to use different weapons depending on the situation, the combat arenas were varied, well paced and forced me to make use of all the resources available to me (including running out of ammo which forced me to leave my safe cover occasionally). Aiming felt responsive and the weapons were different enough for me to have certain favorites and debating which weapon I should keep in my two slots for the next battle. I resent the notion that "average" should suggest "bad" in this case which is what seems to be what's happening here. It's all functional, effective and useful. Average does not mean sub-par. It's average because it does nothing unique with the shooting since the game is not about the fun of the shooting mechanics like a Gears of War, it's about supporting the narrative and context of the world which it does successfully.

I agree completely with you. I really enjoyed the game aspects as well as the story aspects.

#6 Posted by Lord_Punch (138 posts) -

Currently purchasing parts for a new PC. As soon as it is built, Slender will be one of the first games I play.

Nice article, Patrick! Good to have you back.

#7 Posted by Lord_Punch (138 posts) -

Thanks for the middle finger, Konami.

#8 Posted by Lord_Punch (138 posts) -

I like that they are focusing on story more, but Borderlands was a good, mindless game that I could play while listening to podcasts. I hope that can still apply to the sequel. Buying it day-one either way.

#9 Posted by Lord_Punch (138 posts) -

Mitsuru. But I am biased. She was my favorite character from Persona 3. And I love redheads.

#10 Posted by Lord_Punch (138 posts) -

@TheCowman said:

@Lord_Punch:

"Synthesis is basically stating that it would be perfectly okay to force all deaf people to get cochlear implants, because it "improves" them and makes them "better." Sorry. but Synthesis is essentially biological rape."

Oh good. I'm glad we got to the real classy comparisons right away. Bring up Hitler next and we can bury the topic completely. Hyperbole sure is fun, ain't it?

I always love how despite the point of the game being that all choices are valid, people still go out of their way to convince you that your choice was the "wrong" one. But then, this IS the internet; where everyone's opinion is wrong except for your own, so I'm not sure why I'm surprised.

"What it did was murder, and murder is always wrong. The Catalyst needed to be held accountable."

Yeah, I think I actually DID say that it was wrong. Heck, the Catalyst itself said that it was wrong when it admitted that it's solution no longer worked. Nobody's saying it wasn't wrong. If you're so keen to exact physical punishment on it, then choose the Destroy ending.

That's the point of the different endings. For everyone to choose one that matches their own beliefs, opinions, and prejudices. None of them are right or wrong. I always preferred the Synthesis ending (though the extended cut DLC made Control a tie), but I'd never tell anyone that Synthesis is the "right" ending. All the endings have their pros and cons.

Strange that people always get on games with multiple endings about not having clear "right" and "wrong" choices. But then when they get that, all they do is argue about why THEIR choice was the correct one.

"Oh good. I'm glad we got to the real classy comparisons right away. Bring up Hitler next and we can bury the topic completely. Hyperbole sure is fun, ain't it?"

Tell me how my comparison is wrong.

"Heck, the Catalyst itself said that it was wrong when it admitted that it's solution no longer worked."

When the Catalyst says it's solution will no longer work, it's not admitting that it's reasoning for the Reaper solution was wrong. It's not saying that the murders it committed was wrong. It is simply stating that the solution will no longer work because Shepard has beaten the odds, and more options have opened up. It's a terrible piece of writing from a bad writer for a silly character. It is not an admission of guilt.

"If you're so keen to exact physical punishment on it, then choose the Destroy ending."

We don't see anything happen to the Catalyst in the Destroy ending. All we see is it disappear like the end of a transmission. Hardly a satisfactory or fulfiling conclusion for a mass-murdering supervillain.

"Strange that people always get on games with multiple endings about not having clear "right" and "wrong" choices. But then when they get that, all they do is argue about why THEIR choice was the correct one."

What does this have to do with anything I was saying?