War of the mods.

So in a random PM reporting a thread that needed to be locked, a war has erupted between the British mods and the American mods over the word "revision" and the differences between British English and the dumb American English in general. I thought that I'd create a blog on it for two reasons. Firstly, I'm sure some of the community may be interested in the argument, and secondly, so we can stop annoying the chap who created the PM by constantly replying to it and reply here instead.

It's also worth noting that the debate has spilled over onto twitter:

And Formspring:

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Posted by MattyFTM

So in a random PM reporting a thread that needed to be locked, a war has erupted between the British mods and the American mods over the word "revision" and the differences between British English and the dumb American English in general. I thought that I'd create a blog on it for two reasons. Firstly, I'm sure some of the community may be interested in the argument, and secondly, so we can stop annoying the chap who created the PM by constantly replying to it and reply here instead.

It's also worth noting that the debate has spilled over onto twitter:

And Formspring:

Moderator
Posted by Video_Game_King

Oddly enough, I find myself siding with the Americans, since study means "to review information you have already learned", whereas revise means "to change", with connotations of changing things completely, even if that is not always the case.

Posted by Tylea002

I'd comment on this blog, but I'm revising for my A Levels.

Posted by SMTDante89

Hold on, let me get some popcorn.

This is going to be GOOD.

Online
Posted by RecSpec

I learned a new use for the word revision. Hot damn!

Posted by KarlPilkington

Being from England I didn't realise that revising was not a term used in the US.

Posted by Soap

Americans are dumb, don't let it get to you. 


They seem to think a sport that involves running and holding a ball 90% of the time should be called 'football' as well, shows what they know. 
Posted by Red12b

I need to revise this topic, because I find revision to be most helpful, of course revising something that not needs to be revised might be considered a total lack of revising time.

Posted by bassman2112

I kind of think it is contextual as to which meaning is used for 'revise'

I.e. "I need to revise my notes before this test" versus "I think you need to revise this application."

The former means to 'study' whereas the latter implies to 'change.'

I guess what I'm saying is I'm taking the passive Canadian stance and supporting both my colonial buddies and Queen's land.

Posted by HT101

If Captain America was real, he'd be shown punching a Brit in the face and saying "Revision is what freedom lovers say.  Studying is for communists."  I hope that stirs the pot enough.

Posted by AlexW00d

If I try and Google define:studying it breaks Google. This is why you Americans are wrong.

Posted by mfpantst
@Chabbs0: wait- now this argument makes no sense.  Revising is a term we use in the US.  I would say, for example:
"I was revising that document"

Which is to say i was going through and re-writing certain portions for accuracy, tone, or anything really.  I would say that to mean I was going over a written document and making edits.
If I were to say studying, I would say:
"I was studying for my exams"

Or something like that- which is to say that I am going over material that will be covered in something upcoming.  Be that an exam, interview, or anything where I need to know something relatively to moderately (or more) detailed on a subject and that which I currently don't know enough about.

So I'm afraid to say the whole above confuses me because I have two very specific and separate linguistic notions for how I would use either word.
Posted by mfpantst
@AlexW00d: does fucking not break google.
Posted by BraveToaster

"No.. because you don't understand your own language."


You've got to admit, that was pretty funny.
Posted by Azteck

Colour.

It looks stupid. You British people are stupid.

Posted by dudeglove
Posted by Example1013
Posted by arab_prince

Wtf?


How can "revising" mean "studying"? You british have stooped to a whole new low. The only other word that is acceptable, besides studying is "reviewing". Revision means you are changing something/making edits. 
Edited by MattyFTM
@arab_prince said:

Wtf?
How can "revising" mean "studying"? You british have stooped to a whole new low. The only other word that is acceptable, besides studying is "reviewing". Revision means you are changing something/making edits. 

"Revise" comes from the Latin revīsere, which means to look at something again. It's obvious to see how it evolved to mean to study something you've already learned.  I can't find where the alternate definition (i.e. making edits to something) comes from, but if I were to guess, it's probably something you silly Americans cooked up for a nonsensical reason.
Moderator
Posted by mfpantst
@example1013: Your link isn't working so well.  No clue why.  Here's the page link that works for me on the Oxford Dictionary
Alternatively here's the link for Revise as we Americans understand it from the cambridge dictionary, here's the british understanding from the cambridge dictionary, and for the genuine idiots among you arguing that the US use of study is also wrong, here's the cambridge entry.  There are 3 other entries in the cambridge dictionary for Study, all roughly meaning what is in the link I just put for Study.  So here's a suggestion for all the smart-asses:
How about since Revise can mean both what edit means and what study means, you use Edit and Study to mean what you are saying. 

Oh shit.
Posted by Yanngc33

Revising is the correct word, plus it makes you sound fancy

Posted by arab_prince
@MattyFTM said:
@arab_prince said:
Wtf?

How can "revising" mean "studying"? You british have stooped to a whole new low. The only other word that is acceptable, besides studying is "reviewing". Revision means you are changing something/making edits. 
"Revise" comes from the Latin revīsere, which means to look at something again. It's obvious to see how it evolved to mean to study something you've already learned.  I can't find where the alternate definition (i.e. making edits to something) comes from, but if I were to guess, it's probably something you silly Americans cooked up.
Everyone knows, America cooks best.
Posted by mracoon

Colour. Any other way you say spell it is wrong. Also, mum.

Moderator
Posted by Example1013
Posted by Claude

This is about as dumb as this song.

Posted by damswedon

Just some fuel for this fire.

Study
Early 12th Century, from the Old French estudier "to study", that comes from the Medieval Latin studiare, which comes from the Latin studium.


Revise
1560s, "to look at again," from the Medieval French reviser, from the Latin revisere "look at again, visit again," frequentative of revidere, from re- "again" + videre "to see".
Posted by DrJota

Hmm....considering I come from the land of y'all and ain't,American is at a decided disadvantage.However,you guys have Catherine Tate.....so,draw?

Posted by Sanj

Yes, "revising" is a perfectly adequate term to use in lieu of the word "studying". 


Also;

colour not color
plough not plow
cheque not check

Apparently your puny American minds can't handle one or two extra letters.
Posted by Afroman269

I don't revise lecture notes, I study/review them. Conform to my limited/correct American views. And while I'm here, it's theater, not theatre (EVEN THE GIANT BOMB SPELL CHECKER SAYS THEATRE IS WRONG). I only tolerate the U in color because of Pink Floyd. Also, I'm glad that my childhood in Ireland didn't result in me calling my mom, mum. 

Posted by Oni
@Soap said:
Americans are dumb, don't let it get to you. 

They seem to think a sport that involves running and holding a ball 90% of the time should be called 'football' as well, shows what they know. 
I want to hold on to this post forever
Posted by MB
@LiquidSwords said:
As an American, I'd just like to say that eagles are bad ass. Also, the UK loses because English food is fucking terrible.
Moderator
Posted by MattyFTM
Moderator
Posted by mfpantst

 I find it with no small amount of satisfaction that in the Oxford dictionary listing for world english (exiting the US english page I am defaulted to), the definition of Revise you Brits are using is the colloquial version even there.  Making you all great dumbasses for not knowing your own language.  Now that being said, I must also (in fairness) point out that the very specific definition of Study we Americans are supposing you use is also a colloquialism, that is the use of the word to mean preparation for an immediate exam.  However, it is merely an extension of the base definition of Study as a verb whereas the definion of revise you brits are using is listed as a separate definition to the main definition, which is the word we Americans are using (reconsider and alter).  further,  @MattyFTM: it comes from both a latin and french word, becoming an English word 'officially' somewhere in the 1500's.  The definition was clarified in the 1500's as well to "to look over again with intent to improve or amend," from the original base definition of  "to look at again."  So not only is the way in which you are using Revise the colloquial method, it has meant the definition we Americans use Revise as for some time before there was an America.  So I guess it helps to always know thyself then.

Posted by MattyFTM
@mfpantst: Neither of those definitions are colloquial over here. They're both standard in both formal and everyday use. And I never said that the "edit" definition was wrong, I have only ever stated that the "study" definition was right. And it is right, and it's not a colloquialism.
Moderator
Posted by Sweep

@Azteck said:

Colour.

I SEE NO PROBLEM HERE

@dudeglove said:

It was going fine until you got here -___-

Moderator
Posted by mfpantst
@MattyFTM: What I'm trying to say is that while 'revise' may be a word over in the UK you use every day to mean something like "I should be revising for my exams," that specific use is listed in your very own dictionary (Oxford, arbiter of all things english, no?) as the colloquial version specific to the following countries:
UK, New Zealand, Australia.  That should actually mean that it is being used in a very standard fashion in the UK when you say "I should be revising for my exams,"  I'm trying to say just because the usage is standard in formal and everyday use in your country does not invalidate it's status as a colloquialism.  However, I also do believe that the use of Study to mean "I should be studying for my exams" was actually a US localized use at one point- but no longer is.  Well, that last point could be debatable, because a sub-definition of the verb "Study" is "Study Up" and listed as a US colloquialism for the following definition "learn intensively about something, especially in preparation for a test of knowledge."  Unfortunately the term "study up" is not actually commonly used over here in the US, and we tend to say "Study" to mean the Oxford definition of "Study Up." 
However, my main point is that the actual verb use of Revise for "I should be revising for my exams" is listed as a colloquialism in the Oxford dictionary specific to British English.
Posted by ZombiePie

Man...this is some BULLSHIT!

Moderator
Posted by MattyFTM
@mfpantst: Show me where the OED says that definition of revise is a colloquialism.
Moderator
Posted by ReyGitano

This has gone too far. As a Spaniard, I feel it is my duty to inform all of you, you are all using the English language incorrectly.

Posted by hicks91

zombiepie is a fucking retard

Posted by emem
@Oni said:
@Soap said:
Americans are dumb, don't let it get to you. 

They seem to think a sport that involves running and holding a ball 90% of the time should be called 'football' as well, shows what they know. 
I want to hold on to this post forever
Wow, almost fell off my chair reading this.
Edited by A_Dog

Ha, say aluminium. Brilliant.
Also, haemoglobin needs that a. And to up the ante gaol, not jail. 

Posted by mfpantst
@MattyFTM: Ok, first link
The second definition having the british in italics is meant to connote a region specific usage.  HOWEVER, let me say this:

Mea Culpa

I am actually trying to make a point about the use and etymology of the word 'revise' and have been making a grave error in my choice of words.  The british specific definition is really what you may want to call an idiom.  I say this specifically because I'm realizing that you are interpreting my use of colloquial (and rightly so) as slang.  Which your use of 'revise' is most certainly not.  I should have used the term idiom.  And idiom is not a slang term- and may also be a perfectly acceptable formal term.  However, it may be culture specific and/or localized.  Which is what I would suggest your use of revise is.
Posted by ZombiePie

Also I want to just say that it is "zero" not 'naught." I you can't pronounce the most basic numbers in your numerical system you are not civilized.

Also the letter "Z" is superior to the letter "S."

Moderator
Posted by MajesticOverlord

ZombiePie is my Hero.

Posted by Fallen189

Lol 'merica

Posted by Kyreo

As much as I hate to do this, I have to agree with the Brits.

Posted by Mento

This better not lead to a forum-wide schism. I don't want to have to choose between Giant Bomb USA and Tremendous Incendiary UK for video game features in the future.

I do like that there are enough Brits on here for this to become a debate, and not just a dozen "shut up limey" replies for every comment about colours or revision.

Moderator
Posted by Slaker117

I'm American and think the "-our" spelling of words looks more correct than the "-or" version, except for "color". I also like the British pronunciation of the letter "z", but only because it's dumb.

But yeah, it's "studying". Because I'm not crazy.

Posted by Godot
@ZombiePie said:

Also I want to just say that it is "zero" not 'naught." I you can't pronounce the most basic numbers in your numerical system you are not civilized.

Also the letter "Z" is superior to the letter "S."

You could not be more wrong SombiePie.
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