Building my first gaming PC

Never build a PC before, watched a how to video and picked these parts. I wont lie most of them I pick because they were popular and high rated. Please tell me am I bad at picking out parts, this parts wont work or not good for a gaming PC. Mostly want to play free to play mmos, TF2 (I bought it before it went free -.-), half life and Cryostasis. Before I knew prices of parts or what I needed I set the price range to $1000-1100.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130625

EVGA 01G-P3-1556-KR GeForce GTX 550 Ti (Fermi) FPB 1GB 192-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card

$129.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.863016

1x ASUS Sabertooth 990FX AM3+ AMD 990FX SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard with UEFI BIOS

$184.99

1x AMD FX-8120 Zambezi 3.1GHz Socket AM3+ 125W Eight-Core Desktop Processor FD8120FRGUBOX

$189.99

1x CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model CMZ8GX3M2A1600C9B

$49.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811129042

Antec Three Hundred Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case

$59.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827135204

ASUS 24X DVD Burner - Bulk 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 12X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM Black SATA Model DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS - OEM

$19.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822152181

Samsung by Seagate Spinpoint F3 HD502HJ/ST500DM005 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive

$84.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835103065

COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 Plus RR-B10-212P-G1 "Heatpipe Direct Contact" Long Life Sleeve 120mm CPU Cooler Compatible Intel Core i5 & Intel Core i7

$29.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817341018

OCZ ModXStream Pro 700W Modular High Performance Power Supply compatible with Intel Sandybridge Core i3 i5 i7 and AMD Phenom

$89.99

http://www.amazon.com/Windows-Premium-64bit-System-Builder/dp/B004Q0PT3I/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1332891208&sr=8-1

Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64bit (Full) System Builder DVD 1 Pack

$99.99

question about HD, could I put in the HD from this PC? if so then I may just pass I going to windows 7 again dont be afraid to tell me if there is anything wrong with these part chooses.

10 Comments
11 Comments
Posted by MikeydCT

Never build a PC before, watched a how to video and picked these parts. I wont lie most of them I pick because they were popular and high rated. Please tell me am I bad at picking out parts, this parts wont work or not good for a gaming PC. Mostly want to play free to play mmos, TF2 (I bought it before it went free -.-), half life and Cryostasis. Before I knew prices of parts or what I needed I set the price range to $1000-1100.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130625

EVGA 01G-P3-1556-KR GeForce GTX 550 Ti (Fermi) FPB 1GB 192-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card

$129.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.863016

1x ASUS Sabertooth 990FX AM3+ AMD 990FX SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard with UEFI BIOS

$184.99

1x AMD FX-8120 Zambezi 3.1GHz Socket AM3+ 125W Eight-Core Desktop Processor FD8120FRGUBOX

$189.99

1x CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model CMZ8GX3M2A1600C9B

$49.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811129042

Antec Three Hundred Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case

$59.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827135204

ASUS 24X DVD Burner - Bulk 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 12X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM Black SATA Model DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS - OEM

$19.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822152181

Samsung by Seagate Spinpoint F3 HD502HJ/ST500DM005 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive

$84.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835103065

COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 Plus RR-B10-212P-G1 "Heatpipe Direct Contact" Long Life Sleeve 120mm CPU Cooler Compatible Intel Core i5 & Intel Core i7

$29.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817341018

OCZ ModXStream Pro 700W Modular High Performance Power Supply compatible with Intel Sandybridge Core i3 i5 i7 and AMD Phenom

$89.99

http://www.amazon.com/Windows-Premium-64bit-System-Builder/dp/B004Q0PT3I/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1332891208&sr=8-1

Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64bit (Full) System Builder DVD 1 Pack

$99.99

question about HD, could I put in the HD from this PC? if so then I may just pass I going to windows 7 again dont be afraid to tell me if there is anything wrong with these part chooses.

Edited by Sooty

Forget the 8 core, go for an Intel quad core (i5 Sandy) and with some of the money spared buy an SSD. An 8 core setup is totally overkill and I would bet money it'll perform worse than an Intel as AMD are doing quite bad right now. No games are going to be utilising all those cores so the superior architecture of the Intel processors will shine through. Games don't even require quad core yet. 
 
Buy a slightly cheaper motherboard and find the room for a 128GB SSD. It'll be worth it, trust me.    
 
Here it implies that even when all the cores are being used it still can't quite top the Intel quad core line. That's quite embarrassing...
 

"In the very best-case scenario, when you can throw a ton of work at the FX and fully utilize its eight integer cores, it generally falls in between Core i5-2500K and Core i7-2600K—which is where it should appear all of the time given a price tag between those two most relevant competitors. Sometimes FX manages to outperform the higher-end -2600K, but other times it’s embarrassingly bested by its predecessor in threaded workloads.

Toss a single-threaded app at the processor, though, and it underperforms Intel's three-year-old Core i7-920 running at its stock 2.66 GHz. AMD’s architects say they shot to maintain IPC and ramp up clock rate, but something clearly went wrong along the way.

Ironically, consistent, scalable performance is one of the attributes that AMD claims it gets from its Bulldozer module. The issue we see over and over, though, is that it relies on software able to exploit scalability in order to compete. When it doesn’t get what it wants, performance steps back relative to the previous generation. As a result, even though AMD implements a more advanced version of Turbo Core to help improve single-threaded performance, the difference between what you get in lightly- and heavily-threaded applications is anything but consistent.

AMD validly points out that Bulldozer is an architecture in its infancy accompanied by an aggressive roadmap. It incorporates future-looking ISA enhancements and a layout clearly conceptualized with threaded software in mind. Performance in the applications able to take advantage of those considerations is fair in light of AMD's asking price. But the compromises made elsewhere don't justify $245, in my opinion." 

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/fx-8150-zambezi-bulldozer-990fx,3043-24.html
Posted by BiG_Weasel

I could be one of the advisers here, as I've built several PCs with my bare hands, but I won't. I just want to say that there's something great about ordering the components, putting the rig together and powering it on for the first time. I liken it to a gearhead building a muscle car. Congrats, man. Be sure and post pics and benchmarks.

Posted by abomunist
Posted by AhmadMetallic

My first advice is not to listen to anyone right off the bat. Listen to multiple opinions and test everyone's logic before making a decision. 
 
@Sooty: I don't like your SSD nonsense, bro!

Edited by Sooty
@AhmadMetallic said:


@Sooty: I don't like your SSD nonsense, bro!

SSDs are great if you play a lot of single player games, kinda pointless for certain multiplayer games if you have to wait for others to load in. With the price of mechanical drives being so high right now it's a good time to jump on the bandwagon, yo.
Posted by MikeydCT

Ok I don't want to have SSD now but have the option to in the future. Liquid cooling to me sounds wrong and a bad idea to do, liquid and electricity dont mix in my mind.

Edited by MikeydCT

@abomunist: @Sooty:alright, how are these new choose go?

Processor

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115076

Intel Core i5-2300 Sandy Bridge 2.8GHz (3.1GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 2000 BX80623I52300

Now: $179

Motherboard

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157271

ASRock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

$121

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102948

ASRock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

$159

G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10666) Desktop Memory Model F3-10666CL9D-8GBRL

$41

Posted by Doctorchimp

Go Intel.

And I'd say go for a 570. The prices should go down fairly soon since the 600 series is either out or on the way out, I'm not sure. When the 680 is widely available I have 1500 dollars to build a PC. The performance boost is worth it from a 550.

Posted by Tamaster92

I built my new gaming rig last month on a very tight budget and just wanna throw my opinion in, for a larger budget like yours intel should be the choice every time, also an SSD would benefit you as mechanical hard drives are expensive at the moment and it'll help with single player game immensely. Good luck, the sense of satisfaction when you boot up will be all worth it.

Posted by Shivoa

Just to reiterate the above point, the GPU you picked is the wrong one for gaming. I know the list of games you want to play aren't taxing system killers, but if you're going to make a go of a good gaming rig then buy something with the power to last a while. The 550Ti is the GPU where nVidia took their $160 model, threw half of it away, and sold you the rest for a lot more than half of $160. It's the point where the price / performance curve drops of a f'ing cliff so the hardware becomes more of a 'scam those who don't know better and serve those who don't really game but also don't want to live with integrated graphics' rather than a genuine deal with a variable return in investment (the more you spend and you get more and more expensive cards normally then the smaller the benefits per dollar, but this is the cliff where that inverts and every dollar you don't spend massively reduces your potential performance).

The nVidia 560 (or 560 Ti, 560 non-Tis have a range of performances depending on the specific card you buy and can go as fast as the Ti versions but at that point they also cost about the same price) are the bottom run of nVidia's current options that are worth thinking about for gaming, but they are in the process of replacing all those cards with new ones (so in 3 months, at the latest, you'll be looking at advice for buying a 660Ti or something likely) but that's a $200 option and maybe your budget is more limited (although it seems like $1000 total spend should be enough to get you something quite nice). AMD recently released the $160 7770, don't buy it! Get the older AMD 6870 for under $150 (with rebate on NewEgg - I'm not i the US but I'm using them as my guide to how much stuff will cost for you) because it's faster and may use a bit more power but that's not really too important when building a gaming system on a budget.

If you do find you want to spend as much as you can and game with settings turned up (even for stuff like BF3 and other modern marvels - I have no idea if you'll be interested but Steam sales mean there are often very high fidelity titles that push a PC well beyond what any console can currently do for $5 so cost of purchase isn't really a big limiting factor on really shiny games to play if you enjoy them) then the typical enthusiast gaming tier graphics cards are: $250 for the entry level 'nice' model; $350 for the 'really nice' option (usually a slightly restricted / lower performance version of the next one:); and $500 for the 'I have lots of money and I will throw it as getting more shinies or being able to play on my expensive 30" LCD at native res'. That $150 option I offered above (AMD 6870) was released around the $250 area (it was released to just undercut that tier and pick up entry level enthusiasts with a 'close enough' to $250 performance level at the time) but has sunk in price all the way down in the year and change it has been out for.

It makes sense to buy the $250 tier (incredible bang for your buck), I usually aim to buy the $350 model (because it's not totally rational but I spend so much time gaming and messing about with my PC that it's not that expensive and I like to be able to turn up the sliders a bit further at the 1080p of my monitor), and if I had lots of money I'd probably be tempted to get the $500 cards while realising I way paying far too much for the small performance bump over the $350 model.

Right now nVidia have only just released their $500 model (so anything else on sale is the old stuff, the GTX570 is really nice and used to be the $350 card - it now comes in at $260 after rebate, which means it isn't a terrible plan to buy one but you will see a new 660Ti come out for around $250 soon that might be faster and maybe the 670 for around $350 will be a really good deal and very close to the performance of the current king, the GTX680). AMD want to sell you their new cards, the 7870 is $360 and that seems like rather a lot when it isn't much faster than the GTX570 so you're basically paying for it to be more power efficient but not nearly fast enough for the $100 price premium. The 7850 is $260 and is significantly slower than the old GTX570 so that's an insane purchase.

The problem is AMD released these new card to replace their 6xxx series but didn't make them significantly faster per dollar that the cards they replaced. Which means nVidia's old cards (now they're putting sales on them to clear stock before they release the new gen cards in the next few months) are killing them on everything but power consumption (new cards are significantly ahead there, but AMD are running their stuff cooler so it's not even as if they're significantly quieter as AMD decided to keep the fans running fast). You'd be better off looking for a sale on the old 6970, but my quick check of NewEgg says those cards are not being reduced to clear like the GTX570 that they're roughly on par with. The old AMD 6950 is not as fast as the GTX570 so that isn't a great deal around the $250 prices they go for.

Right now, if AMD had done their job right, I should be telling you to get the 7850 or maybe spring for the 7870 if you can afford to drop $350 on a GPU (it's more important than for games and you'll probably drop $200-250 on a CPU so it makes sense to spend big on a GPU). But they're just not that attractive an offer. They're new (and in limited supply) so no one is offering rebates or sale prices. TL;DR: If you want to buy an enthusiast GPU today (and aren't going big with a $500 behemoth, where the GTX680 is a great card if you can find one in stock) then I'd say you probably want to spend $260 on a GTX570. If you want to buy a gaming capable but not enthusiast fast (don't get me wrong, for the games you list, this option will still be great but you're not buying high end and it seems a waste to not spend the extra $100 on a nice GPU for your gaming rig when you're aiming to spend a grand on the total package - this is a fast $150 card, really fast for basically everything you can play today but you can't just crank every slider to max and expect 30+fps, you may in some games have to go through and find the option to move to high rather than ultra to get the game to be smooth) GPU then AMD have you sorted with the old 6870 for $150.

So the 6870 is what you should be buying rather than the 550Ti (which you really should not buy, really) and if you've got a hankering for some extra shiny (or, to look at it another way, less problems with getting all your shiny in future games that will ask more of the card in the next few years of owning this PC) then a GTX570 with rebate is a really good deal on a properly blazing fast card. And if you're not buying right now then maybe want and see what nVidia release for $250 in the upcoming months, I'm not convinced it'll blow away the 570 but I can't see the future and guarantee you that they won't make something better that was arguable worth waiting for. You'll not go wrong buying either of those options today.