playing a game with pretty much no idea what it is

today i rented Shadows of the Damned:

now that i've gotten to spend a couple of hours with it, this game is pretty fuckin fly. it even taught me to swear a goddamn lot, so egg on the faces of those pundits who claim that video games can't teach people things

my review for Trenched is also up, so you can have another writeup to pale in importance to whatever the industry heavyweights have to say. verdict on that game is to buy and love it-- oh son of a bitch i just spoiled the fucking review

thanks to Shinji Mikami and Suda51 teaming up for a game, Shadows of the Damned hit my radar this week. there's a freaking trifecta - in fact - of talent here thanks to the involvement of Silent Hill sound director Akira Yamaoka taking helm of the game's audio atmosphere. well, those dudes along with a whirlwind of chatter on twitter, that is. you know you're into games something fierce when there are developer names who you recognize and follow, as if they're a decades-old movie director. be that as it may, they sold me on checking this one out, and i'm very impressed at the time. i draw a lot of comparisons to Resident Evil 4 when taking this game for a spin, as it plays like a more refined and action-oriented RE title

it also makes me hate myself even more for playing RE5 now, because this handles a lot like what RE5 should have. Resident Evil may have hit franchise fatigue, though, because it's also worn out its welcome of over-the-top craziness that SotD pulls off really well. it's hard not to draw parallels between SotD and RE4/5, ;f not for Mikami's direction on RE4 and how that changed in RE5, but also because i found out that i really really like having a button to 180 in a game-- something i didn't even realize i missed in shooters

another comparison relevant to SotD seems to be the extremely offensive, gory, and at times juvenile character of the game is against Duke Nukem forever-- if only for the close window of release between the two. i don't think this is a compelling topic, because the games are being evaluated based on far more than their attitude, and that doesn't seem to be part of what is taken into account when comparing their polarized receptions. it was worth mentioning, though

worth talking about moreso, is going into games nice and fresh-- intentional media blackout or not

for Trenched, i knew i would play it eventually due to it being a Double Fine title. while i may love that company, I never messed with Brutal legend, and Stacking wore down on me pretty quick, despite its appealing take on adventure games and unique art direction. if you couldn't tell, a game's style is a pretty big deal to me. don't get me wrong-- without some solid gameplay then you have a shiny-looking turd. that doesn't mean i'll always settle for bare-bones aesthetics or audio, either (unless it's a purposeful stylistic decision). for whatever reason, Stacked just didn't click with me. to round out their downloadable curriculum vitae, i had a good time with Costume Quest, but wasn't crazy about it

Trenched changes a lot of that, as it's the most gamey, and action-oriented game of their to date. that humor is more snuck away in favor of a lot of character, and the world they created hit a lot of the right notes for me

i also went into it knowing pretty much nothing, which meant there was nothing to lose and nothing to gain

as much as i love getting hyped up for games, i tend to have a better experience by taking trusted developer pedigree and word-of-mouth from people i can count on, without exhausting preview material and building fantasies of what could be. an unbiased, fresh experience with no preconceptions of what i 'should' expect have been yielding some fantastic results lately. i walked out of Bayonetta feeling so good because of this, again more recently with Trenched, and am finding another great discovery in Shadows of the Damned

note that these aren't completely blind investments, but are based on knowing what i like and what to expect from a developer or studio, or who to rely on for a quick elevator opinion. try it out sometime

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Posted by Mr_Spinnington

today i rented Shadows of the Damned:

now that i've gotten to spend a couple of hours with it, this game is pretty fuckin fly. it even taught me to swear a goddamn lot, so egg on the faces of those pundits who claim that video games can't teach people things

my review for Trenched is also up, so you can have another writeup to pale in importance to whatever the industry heavyweights have to say. verdict on that game is to buy and love it-- oh son of a bitch i just spoiled the fucking review

thanks to Shinji Mikami and Suda51 teaming up for a game, Shadows of the Damned hit my radar this week. there's a freaking trifecta - in fact - of talent here thanks to the involvement of Silent Hill sound director Akira Yamaoka taking helm of the game's audio atmosphere. well, those dudes along with a whirlwind of chatter on twitter, that is. you know you're into games something fierce when there are developer names who you recognize and follow, as if they're a decades-old movie director. be that as it may, they sold me on checking this one out, and i'm very impressed at the time. i draw a lot of comparisons to Resident Evil 4 when taking this game for a spin, as it plays like a more refined and action-oriented RE title

it also makes me hate myself even more for playing RE5 now, because this handles a lot like what RE5 should have. Resident Evil may have hit franchise fatigue, though, because it's also worn out its welcome of over-the-top craziness that SotD pulls off really well. it's hard not to draw parallels between SotD and RE4/5, ;f not for Mikami's direction on RE4 and how that changed in RE5, but also because i found out that i really really like having a button to 180 in a game-- something i didn't even realize i missed in shooters

another comparison relevant to SotD seems to be the extremely offensive, gory, and at times juvenile character of the game is against Duke Nukem forever-- if only for the close window of release between the two. i don't think this is a compelling topic, because the games are being evaluated based on far more than their attitude, and that doesn't seem to be part of what is taken into account when comparing their polarized receptions. it was worth mentioning, though

worth talking about moreso, is going into games nice and fresh-- intentional media blackout or not

for Trenched, i knew i would play it eventually due to it being a Double Fine title. while i may love that company, I never messed with Brutal legend, and Stacking wore down on me pretty quick, despite its appealing take on adventure games and unique art direction. if you couldn't tell, a game's style is a pretty big deal to me. don't get me wrong-- without some solid gameplay then you have a shiny-looking turd. that doesn't mean i'll always settle for bare-bones aesthetics or audio, either (unless it's a purposeful stylistic decision). for whatever reason, Stacked just didn't click with me. to round out their downloadable curriculum vitae, i had a good time with Costume Quest, but wasn't crazy about it

Trenched changes a lot of that, as it's the most gamey, and action-oriented game of their to date. that humor is more snuck away in favor of a lot of character, and the world they created hit a lot of the right notes for me

i also went into it knowing pretty much nothing, which meant there was nothing to lose and nothing to gain

as much as i love getting hyped up for games, i tend to have a better experience by taking trusted developer pedigree and word-of-mouth from people i can count on, without exhausting preview material and building fantasies of what could be. an unbiased, fresh experience with no preconceptions of what i 'should' expect have been yielding some fantastic results lately. i walked out of Bayonetta feeling so good because of this, again more recently with Trenched, and am finding another great discovery in Shadows of the Damned

note that these aren't completely blind investments, but are based on knowing what i like and what to expect from a developer or studio, or who to rely on for a quick elevator opinion. try it out sometime