MuttersomeTaxicab's forum posts

#1 Posted by MuttersomeTaxicab (668 posts) -

The only thing that really bugs me is how long it takes to load on PS3. That 30ish second loading time after you die is a real buzzkill.

The most important part to me is that Dark Souls 2 makes me feel like I'm playing a different game. I don't want something that will just carry all my strategies over from Dark Souls 1. I've mastered Dark Souls 1 in a lot of ways, or as much as I really want to. I don't really play the Souls games to feel like a badass. I play them to feel like I'm going to get mashed if I make a mistake, if I don't pay enough attention, etc.

I like the stuff that makes this game not a Demon's Souls game or Dark Souls: Rehashed Edition. Like, if I really want to play a game that behaves like Dark Souls 1, I can still go back to that and probably find something I haven't experienced or done. I also haven't beaten Demon's Souls (yet) and it's a similar flavour, but fundamentally different in some pretty important ways.

I feel like Dark Souls will always be the quintessential experience for me, but it was also my first taste of the franchise. There's a part of me that's frustrated I'm not falling in as hard with Dark Souls 2 as I did with the first, but I've literally played Dark Souls 1 for over a hundred and fifty hours. That's fifteen times the amount of time I've spent with Dark Souls 2. Of course I won't feel the same about it. Also, I don't feel like I *should* feel the same way about it. There's way too many safe bets in video games these days.

#2 Posted by MuttersomeTaxicab (668 posts) -

I love me some Dragon's Dogma, but there's also a *lot* in that game I haven't experienced yet. I'm fine with them holding off and maybe circling back around to making one exclusively for PS4 and Xbox One. Curious about the handheld game, but I like weird little handheld games.

#3 Edited by MuttersomeTaxicab (668 posts) -

I am probably more excited for this than I am for P5. Not saying I'm proud of or okay with that, but I loved the shit out of the EO games that came out in 2013. Really glad the EO team is getting work and (seem) to be selling games.

#4 Posted by MuttersomeTaxicab (668 posts) -

I've been keeping an eye on this game since it appeared on Steam. That said, I've got the last bits of EOIV to finish up and all of EO: The Untold Story plus some Legend of Grimrock stuff to work my way through before I'll really have time for this. I really hope it does okay for them and that Ubi will keep going. Looks pretty spiffy.

#5 Posted by MuttersomeTaxicab (668 posts) -

I played Ultra Business Tycoon III a while back when Patrick tweeted it or something, and I didn't really get it. The idea of this DOS-era shareware game juxtaposed with deeply personal moments doesn't really resonate with me, I guess. Porpentine seems like she's lived an... interesting life, and I can't really relate to that. I guess I should make a Twine game about being a straight white male growing up in a stable, relatively happy home environment.

You certainly could if you wanted to.

#6 Posted by MuttersomeTaxicab (668 posts) -

So far its really really damn fun. Its more like the downhill stages in Tony Hawk, only 2d of course, and the trick system is a lot like SSX in that you load it up and release to jump etc. It is fast, intuitive, and I feel safe saying worth every penny.

As for the Super Meat Boy thing, sure in that it controls astoundingly well and the later stages get really damn hard. But really I find it more similar to Dustforce because its about perfect runs through a level for top scores and has a similar in the zone flowing through a stage feel to it.

Nailed it.

The only bummer is that it suddenly crashes from time to time. It seemed to happen the most during the tutorial stage and the first level or so. I then played for like 3 hours last night and it stopped crashing for some reason.

#7 Posted by MuttersomeTaxicab (668 posts) -

@humanity said:

The problem with creating articles like these that specifically highlight the game maker almost more so than the game(s) itself, is putting an elephant in the room and asking everyone to be civil and not comment on it.

These games are ok, fairly basic indie stuff that doesn't really draw me in one way or another. The developer seems likewise fairly standard in their commentary and motivations. It's everything outside of this very basic game-designer package which gets a bit unorthodox. Since this article presents the artist alongside the art, you immediately connect one with the other. I unwittingly followed the Tumblr link and to be perfectly honest, some of the stuff that I saw there made me a little more than uncomfortable - which in turn makes me associate that feeling with the games now and that pushes me away.

Is that rude for me to say? It really shouldn't be. As much as the developer has every right in the world to put that stuff up for everyone to see, to be shocked, inspired or offended, it is my right to actually feel offended when I do and be able to say as much. Now I wasn't offended per-se, but as I said it did make me feel uncomfortable.

The only reason I point this out more so than the content of the article itself is that I'm all for open discussion on the site, but that means being completely open about everything. This of course doesn't mean vitriolic and outright offensive comments should be tolerated, but I see so many people dancing around a point they're trying to make because they "don't want to sound like a jerk" when in fact they're just stating an opinion.

That said, Porpentine is generally inextricable from her work. She's made numerous comments about how her games and writing are literal extensions of herself. Another aspect of her work is that her games are necessarily built on creating that discomfort within her audience. By and large, I don't think Patrick could have written this article any other way. Plenty of the comments have absolutely been, "this makes me uncomfortable" - and that's a totally valid and reasonable response. However, it's not ok for people to resort to insults or to otherwise denigrate (well, anyone, but in particular the subject of the article) with dismissive namecalling. It's this last part that some folks continue to have problems with.

#8 Edited by MuttersomeTaxicab (668 posts) -

<3 DAT PORP.

#9 Posted by MuttersomeTaxicab (668 posts) -

@knopper7 said:

Text adventure websites are not ART.

Of course they are.

#10 Edited by MuttersomeTaxicab (668 posts) -

Just gonna pop my head in and say:

  1. Most critics will tend to put a caveat about price/length of game in the review if there isn't multiplayer, or there isn't online multiplayer. Or if the game is only doing one or two things - even if it does those things exceedingly well.
  2. At no point should price be a central metric of a game's value. Pricing fluctuates too rapidly, and the way that individuals value money or time is already so subjective that even attaching these objective-looking numbers to the critique, it falls apart on a case-by-case basis.

Can't get friends together on the regular to play a local multiplayer game? Then as cool as that game is, it's probably not for you. This is OK. Not all games are for everybody. However, just because the game isn't worth that money to *you* doesn't make it overpriced or above some arbitrarily "ideal" price. It just means that the game isn't worth the money to *you* - it's an opinion, and those are never universal (yes, even when a game is frequently praised by critics).