Tim Schafer's Got a Problem

This is a blog/article/something with a lot of words written down by a guy who has no clue about what he's talking about. For the most part it's a rambling mess, because the writer in question approaches each blog/article/lotsadamnwordsthing with a general idea and that's about it. Fair warning, this could get pretty damn long. 
 
 Tim Schafer. Funniest Man in Gaming.
Tim Schafer is an interesting chap, isn't he? 
 
He's got that sort of Mad Scientist hair-cut that many self-flagellating faux-intellectual aspire to craft, and he's got that kind of wispy half-beard that speaks of "I'm an artist, and I don't give two shits about what I look like". These are bad qualities when discussing someone who hasn't seen hide nor hair of success. However, this man, this Tim Schafer, has had quite a bit of success, hasn't he? 
 
From my understanding, his first real writing success (and that is the key understanding here; Tim Schafer is a writer first and foremost) from the Monkey Island series of games. From there he also wrote and produced titles like Grim Fandango and Day of the Tentacle. From my understanding, these are adventure titles and reputed to be very funny, if not touching on some emotional level. 
 
I write this all down because Tim Schafer, to me, is someone who has a lot of good ideas... and absolutely no damn clue on how to execute them. 
 
I will profess here and now, that I am the quintessential Nobody. I haven't accomplished nearly any of the feats Tim Schafer has, and I doubt I ever will. Life has treated us both very differently, and personally, I do like his style. This blog, however, is about the misconceptions we as the gaming community seem to have about this chubby, innocuous artisan. 
 
Let me preface this odd little thing by stating that I have only played two of the Monkey Island titles, skipped his later adventure games, and have only played his most recent foray into the console market in the last six years. It is armed with this lack of knowledge or, perhaps, this removal from Schafer-dom that I feel I can articulate why it is his games, for lack of a better term, don't sell.  
 
It's funny, though, isn't it? Tim Schafer is held up by many gamers with fond memories for his work as someone to be inspired by. He's done a lot of interesting things, experimenting with genre-melding and has, consistently, crafted well-done tales about many different objects. He's made funny games, he's made a serious game (From what I've been told, Grim Fandango fits this description), and he's made bat-shit-crazy-why-the-hell-not games (Brutal Legend). Yet in the entirety of Tim Schafer's catalogue, I can't help but wonder why it is that this modern day comedic genius has not really seen the monetary success he seemingly deserves.  
 
I must also admit I have never played Psychonauts. I've heard from all who have played it that it was a fun platforming game with a cool story and really hilarious scenarios. I can safely say I had no interest in the title, and skipped it in lieu of something else (as I imagine many other gamers did, as well). So what does that leave me with then, to try and articulate Tim Schafer's lack of monetary success? 
 

Fucking cool protagonist. 

Brutal Legend. 

 
This game was destined to be fantastic, I thought. I can remember sitting in front of a Mac's convenience store--on the curb with my butt staining the short-cut summer grass--and flipping through that month's Game Informer magazine. It promised the reveal of the "next comedic adventure by Tim Schafer's studio Double Fine". It was intriguing, and I had never really heard of this Schafer character before, but the art design was inspired, and it looked genuinely different from anything else I had seen that year. I read the article, I enjoyed it, and I began to look forward to Brutal Legend. I mean, surely a game that was a simple ode to classic heavy metal was going to be a success, both critically and commercially. It had seemed that, with the rise of Guitar Hero and the return of Rock N' Roll, that a game of this magnitude, a game that had you playing as a demon-slaying Metal Roadie in a fantasy land ripped straight from heavy metal album covers... it just seemed like a can't lose scenario.  
 
And oh my God, how I was wrong. 
 
Now, Brutal Legend isn't a BAD game. Far from it. Each of the game's mechanics work competently well. The problem, however, is that none of it--all mashed together--is exactly fun. It's just... not. The hack and slash elements are slow and stilted, lacking the fluidity of a Devil May Cry or a God of War title. The open-world adventuring was slow and tedious thanks to the poor navigational system and lack of mini-map, and the RTS elements... well... let's just say that if Blizzard couldn't figure out RTS controls for the N64, then there's simply no hope for the genre on a console. 
 
So why is it, then, that I and many other gamers endured the lacklustre gameplay? Was it for the story? The characters? The plot? No, I don't think so. When you boil it down, distill Brutal Legend into its most basic components, what you have is a rather bland I-can-do-everything sandbox game. The design is certainly inspired, yes, and the musical score (when not being assaulted by Amazing Metal™) is decent. The voice acting, too, is well done and each character is brought to life quite swimmingly. So why then, does this game not live up to the hype? 
 
It seems to be that the Tim Schafer name has become a brand of sorts. For evidence of this, look no farther than the boxart for the game Brutal Legend. It has his name in a decent sized font right on top of the logo. "A Tim Schafer Game". What does this say, then? I think, honestly, the pretension one must have to think his name will sell a title is a little preposterous in this industry. Games are not the same as television or film, because there is no single creative vision. It is the collaboration of a hundred artists working together under a shared vision. It can be steered by a producer or a "Creative Director", but in the end, it's not their project alone. You can't point to one game and say "This game exists because of a single person". You just can't.  
 

 FOR THE METAL!

That, in my opinion, is the first sign of Tim Schafer's problem. 
 
So again, why did this game not live up to the hype? If I were to put a finger on it, I'd say it's because while Tim Schafer has tremendous talent as a writer, he has absolutely no idea on the basics of a well-designed game. A game cannot stand alone on its story and voice acting. You need interesting if not outright fun gameplay to reward the player. This coupled with the lack of an oversight on "his" project, and I believe that is why we have the RTS elements that we do. I'm pretty sure that if he were simply The Writer, what Brutal Legend would have become was a competent hack-n-slash with some open world elements that was well written and beautifully designed. Alas, we did not get this, and I feel that the major culprit of this nefarious deed is Tim Schafer himself. 
 
Honestly, why is it that this game has such loving detail spent on its writing and cutscene composition, and yet almost no attention is paid to the gameplay? The gameplay is key, isn't it? It's the reason we play games, or at least, that's what most people would think. 
 
And yet we have broken combat and barely functional RTS gameplay. I mean, it baffles me. After all these years and all of these great RTS studios have tried and consistently failed to bring an RTS to consoles in a competent way, what the hell could have possessed one Tim Schafer to think that Brutal Legend would have worked out differently? 
 
I almost hate to say it, but I think it's arrogance, on his part and EA's. 
 

 I like Jack, and I like Tim. They should work together again. Hopefully I'll be able to play it without frustration.

And that's really what it boils down to: arrogance. To Tim Schafer's credit, the man is genuinely a funny and a seemingly nice individual. While it may be emasculating to say so (and that is not my intent), I honestly don't think that man could harm a fly. He just doesn't seem to have a mean bone in his body... and yet, why is it his games just fucking suck at gameplay? It's arrogance. Plain and simple. 
 
I think the problem with Tim Schafer Games™ is that the man has no one challenging him. Everyone from the gaming press to the gaming community reveres Tim Schafer's work for being brilliant fiction for the medium. There is only so long a person can ignore that kind of praise without starting to believe it. There is nothing wrong with confidence, but once you start believing everything you touch will turn to gold, that's when you let little things like bad animation and jarring navigational systems muck up your game.  
 
What Tim Schafer Games™ needs is someone to challenge him. Not the aloof arrogance of believing that good writing will see you through to critical (and more importantly, financial) acclaim. The man has been in the games industry for almost--if not--twenty or more years. He cut his teeth on adventure titles where gameplay consisted of clicking on objects and seeing what got you through a puzzle and what didn't. To make the leap from that to third-person platforming, to third-person hack n' slash-and-everything-else-too is not a good idea without some entity overseeing it and making damn sure you get the gameplay right.  
 
As it stands, Tim Schafer does very good writing, but really, when you boil it down, the man needs people around him that won't gawk at his creativity and lavish him with high praise. What the man needs is someone willing to say to him "That's a bad idea", and like all technical and not creative types, they can be the unsung heroes that often save a title.  
 
So what's the point? 
 
The point, I suppose, is that Tim Schafer is a very talented writer. What he is not, however, is a talented game designer. I think, personally, that the more critical the gaming press and community becomes of this aspect of his work, the sooner we will see a rise in quality. And perhaps, maybe, just maybe, the first financial break-out title for a man (and studio!) who so richly deserve it... if only for the sheer creativity he and Double Fine bring to the table.
16 Comments
17 Comments
Posted by Oldirtybearon
This is a blog/article/something with a lot of words written down by a guy who has no clue about what he's talking about. For the most part it's a rambling mess, because the writer in question approaches each blog/article/lotsadamnwordsthing with a general idea and that's about it. Fair warning, this could get pretty damn long. 
 
 Tim Schafer. Funniest Man in Gaming.
Tim Schafer is an interesting chap, isn't he? 
 
He's got that sort of Mad Scientist hair-cut that many self-flagellating faux-intellectual aspire to craft, and he's got that kind of wispy half-beard that speaks of "I'm an artist, and I don't give two shits about what I look like". These are bad qualities when discussing someone who hasn't seen hide nor hair of success. However, this man, this Tim Schafer, has had quite a bit of success, hasn't he? 
 
From my understanding, his first real writing success (and that is the key understanding here; Tim Schafer is a writer first and foremost) from the Monkey Island series of games. From there he also wrote and produced titles like Grim Fandango and Day of the Tentacle. From my understanding, these are adventure titles and reputed to be very funny, if not touching on some emotional level. 
 
I write this all down because Tim Schafer, to me, is someone who has a lot of good ideas... and absolutely no damn clue on how to execute them. 
 
I will profess here and now, that I am the quintessential Nobody. I haven't accomplished nearly any of the feats Tim Schafer has, and I doubt I ever will. Life has treated us both very differently, and personally, I do like his style. This blog, however, is about the misconceptions we as the gaming community seem to have about this chubby, innocuous artisan. 
 
Let me preface this odd little thing by stating that I have only played two of the Monkey Island titles, skipped his later adventure games, and have only played his most recent foray into the console market in the last six years. It is armed with this lack of knowledge or, perhaps, this removal from Schafer-dom that I feel I can articulate why it is his games, for lack of a better term, don't sell.  
 
It's funny, though, isn't it? Tim Schafer is held up by many gamers with fond memories for his work as someone to be inspired by. He's done a lot of interesting things, experimenting with genre-melding and has, consistently, crafted well-done tales about many different objects. He's made funny games, he's made a serious game (From what I've been told, Grim Fandango fits this description), and he's made bat-shit-crazy-why-the-hell-not games (Brutal Legend). Yet in the entirety of Tim Schafer's catalogue, I can't help but wonder why it is that this modern day comedic genius has not really seen the monetary success he seemingly deserves.  
 
I must also admit I have never played Psychonauts. I've heard from all who have played it that it was a fun platforming game with a cool story and really hilarious scenarios. I can safely say I had no interest in the title, and skipped it in lieu of something else (as I imagine many other gamers did, as well). So what does that leave me with then, to try and articulate Tim Schafer's lack of monetary success? 
 

Fucking cool protagonist. 

Brutal Legend. 

 
This game was destined to be fantastic, I thought. I can remember sitting in front of a Mac's convenience store--on the curb with my butt staining the short-cut summer grass--and flipping through that month's Game Informer magazine. It promised the reveal of the "next comedic adventure by Tim Schafer's studio Double Fine". It was intriguing, and I had never really heard of this Schafer character before, but the art design was inspired, and it looked genuinely different from anything else I had seen that year. I read the article, I enjoyed it, and I began to look forward to Brutal Legend. I mean, surely a game that was a simple ode to classic heavy metal was going to be a success, both critically and commercially. It had seemed that, with the rise of Guitar Hero and the return of Rock N' Roll, that a game of this magnitude, a game that had you playing as a demon-slaying Metal Roadie in a fantasy land ripped straight from heavy metal album covers... it just seemed like a can't lose scenario.  
 
And oh my God, how I was wrong. 
 
Now, Brutal Legend isn't a BAD game. Far from it. Each of the game's mechanics work competently well. The problem, however, is that none of it--all mashed together--is exactly fun. It's just... not. The hack and slash elements are slow and stilted, lacking the fluidity of a Devil May Cry or a God of War title. The open-world adventuring was slow and tedious thanks to the poor navigational system and lack of mini-map, and the RTS elements... well... let's just say that if Blizzard couldn't figure out RTS controls for the N64, then there's simply no hope for the genre on a console. 
 
So why is it, then, that I and many other gamers endured the lacklustre gameplay? Was it for the story? The characters? The plot? No, I don't think so. When you boil it down, distill Brutal Legend into its most basic components, what you have is a rather bland I-can-do-everything sandbox game. The design is certainly inspired, yes, and the musical score (when not being assaulted by Amazing Metal™) is decent. The voice acting, too, is well done and each character is brought to life quite swimmingly. So why then, does this game not live up to the hype? 
 
It seems to be that the Tim Schafer name has become a brand of sorts. For evidence of this, look no farther than the boxart for the game Brutal Legend. It has his name in a decent sized font right on top of the logo. "A Tim Schafer Game". What does this say, then? I think, honestly, the pretension one must have to think his name will sell a title is a little preposterous in this industry. Games are not the same as television or film, because there is no single creative vision. It is the collaboration of a hundred artists working together under a shared vision. It can be steered by a producer or a "Creative Director", but in the end, it's not their project alone. You can't point to one game and say "This game exists because of a single person". You just can't.  
 

 FOR THE METAL!

That, in my opinion, is the first sign of Tim Schafer's problem. 
 
So again, why did this game not live up to the hype? If I were to put a finger on it, I'd say it's because while Tim Schafer has tremendous talent as a writer, he has absolutely no idea on the basics of a well-designed game. A game cannot stand alone on its story and voice acting. You need interesting if not outright fun gameplay to reward the player. This coupled with the lack of an oversight on "his" project, and I believe that is why we have the RTS elements that we do. I'm pretty sure that if he were simply The Writer, what Brutal Legend would have become was a competent hack-n-slash with some open world elements that was well written and beautifully designed. Alas, we did not get this, and I feel that the major culprit of this nefarious deed is Tim Schafer himself. 
 
Honestly, why is it that this game has such loving detail spent on its writing and cutscene composition, and yet almost no attention is paid to the gameplay? The gameplay is key, isn't it? It's the reason we play games, or at least, that's what most people would think. 
 
And yet we have broken combat and barely functional RTS gameplay. I mean, it baffles me. After all these years and all of these great RTS studios have tried and consistently failed to bring an RTS to consoles in a competent way, what the hell could have possessed one Tim Schafer to think that Brutal Legend would have worked out differently? 
 
I almost hate to say it, but I think it's arrogance, on his part and EA's. 
 

 I like Jack, and I like Tim. They should work together again. Hopefully I'll be able to play it without frustration.

And that's really what it boils down to: arrogance. To Tim Schafer's credit, the man is genuinely a funny and a seemingly nice individual. While it may be emasculating to say so (and that is not my intent), I honestly don't think that man could harm a fly. He just doesn't seem to have a mean bone in his body... and yet, why is it his games just fucking suck at gameplay? It's arrogance. Plain and simple. 
 
I think the problem with Tim Schafer Games™ is that the man has no one challenging him. Everyone from the gaming press to the gaming community reveres Tim Schafer's work for being brilliant fiction for the medium. There is only so long a person can ignore that kind of praise without starting to believe it. There is nothing wrong with confidence, but once you start believing everything you touch will turn to gold, that's when you let little things like bad animation and jarring navigational systems muck up your game.  
 
What Tim Schafer Games™ needs is someone to challenge him. Not the aloof arrogance of believing that good writing will see you through to critical (and more importantly, financial) acclaim. The man has been in the games industry for almost--if not--twenty or more years. He cut his teeth on adventure titles where gameplay consisted of clicking on objects and seeing what got you through a puzzle and what didn't. To make the leap from that to third-person platforming, to third-person hack n' slash-and-everything-else-too is not a good idea without some entity overseeing it and making damn sure you get the gameplay right.  
 
As it stands, Tim Schafer does very good writing, but really, when you boil it down, the man needs people around him that won't gawk at his creativity and lavish him with high praise. What the man needs is someone willing to say to him "That's a bad idea", and like all technical and not creative types, they can be the unsung heroes that often save a title.  
 
So what's the point? 
 
The point, I suppose, is that Tim Schafer is a very talented writer. What he is not, however, is a talented game designer. I think, personally, that the more critical the gaming press and community becomes of this aspect of his work, the sooner we will see a rise in quality. And perhaps, maybe, just maybe, the first financial break-out title for a man (and studio!) who so richly deserve it... if only for the sheer creativity he and Double Fine bring to the table.
Posted by TooWalrus

That's a lot of test, and I don't really want to read it. I just want to say "I still love Brutal Legend"

Posted by Equal_Opportunity_Destroyer497

Had you played Psychonauts this diatribe you've written here would be very different. I won't argue that Brutal Legend didn't disappoint but Tim made the game he wanted to make. That's called confidence, not arrogance. I do feel that going forward, more of Double Fine's focus should be on gameplay (focus testing wouldn't be a bad idea either). If the gameplay was brought up to the same level as the writing then we could all stop bitching a bit and just enjoy the games.

Posted by Brendan

Woah woah woah wait a minute...you're Avatar is from Reboot.  That's awesome :D
Posted by ProfessorEss

This seems to be more about Brutal Legend than Tim Schafer.
 
@KingWilly said:

The point, I suppose, is that Tim Schafer is a very talented writer. What he is not, however, is a talented game designer.
 
I would say he is also a very talented game designer. All of his games have been excellent on every level, except for Brutal Legend. I loved Brutal Legend personally, but I would agree with most in saying he made a mistake going RTS and Multiplayer with it.
 
I can't think of another title of his that didn't absolutely and completely fire on all cylinders, and to say one flawed game suddenly means he's a poor developer just doesn't seem fair when you look at his entire resume.
Posted by Oldirtybearon
@ProfessorEss: I respect your stance on the issue, but when you get down to brass-tacks, adventure titles are not on the same level as more interactive genres. The more interactive the genre, the more the programming, the more work involved. 
 
This is, I think, the fundamental flaw with Schafer-dom's argument; almost his entire catalogue consists of adventure titles. I know of two titles he's had a hand in creating that were not, and apparently one of them was a great platformer, and the other was not a well-executed title. The funny thing? Neither of them made a dime.  
 
@Equal_Opportunity_Destroyer497:
  Not a diatribe, good sir, just thoughts and potential theories on why Brutal Legend as a game failed. It wasn't the writing, the aesthetic, or the sound design--just the gameplay. And I'd consider that a very big flaw for a video game. I would like nothing more than to see more of Schafer and more people in the industry like him--but that won't happen if his games continue to sell poorly. The side-effect of another title not delivering on sales would probably mean the end for Double Fine, and quite possibly the end of Tim Schafer as a viable brand.  
 
In other words, you can view this blog as an attack on Tim Schafer and all that is holy in him, or you can see it for what it is; concern for the future of Double Fine. 
Posted by yinstarrunner

You need to play Psychonauts. You're only hurting yourself by not having played it.

Posted by TheHBK

Totally agree, best fucking article about Big Time Timmy Jim.  And Psychonauts, yeah not my cup of tea, sorry guys but the setting and story for that was not for me so its not gonna fly. I also doubt lots of you guys bought that game leading to poor sales.  Or you bought it when it was in the bargain bin and it was too late.
Posted by Jimbo

Tim Schafer's 'problem' is that he isn't prepared to just take the pledge and put out unimaginative shit in order to make bank.  Brutal Legend maybe isn't the best example, because by all accounts it isn't his best work, but it still would have been easy for him just to make a God of War clone with Jack Black, and it undoubtedly would have been far more successful.
 
Contrast that with poeople like Peter Molyneux or Sid Meier - both of whom I have all the respect in the world for, and already have rock solid legacies behind them, as Schafer does- who are happy enough nowadays to keep putting out the same game over and over again.  They're financially successful, but they're both wasting their talent - Molyneux won't be remembered for Fable 3 and Meier won't be remembered for Civ 5.  At least Schafer is still trying, at least he hasn't let the setbacks force him into making 'safe' games.  How many of our early gaming luminaries can still say that at this point? 

Posted by Superfriend

Psychonauts as a plattformer was just weak. I liked the setting, even though the artstyle was a bit too funky- but those jumping parts... oh god! A lot of people complained about Beyond Good and Evil being too easy, but at least you could get through some wonky parts (stealth) to enjoy the story and the setting some more. Psychonauts just drove me insane. I really wanted to like it, but I couldn´t. Not a hard game, mind you, but a game with horrendous design flaws.

Posted by Oldirtybearon
@Jimbo: It isn't about making safe games, though. It's about making sure that there is good gameplay involved. 
 
I like Tim, and I like his studio's work. I want nothing more for Double Fine to succeed and ideally for Publishers to let the dogs off their leashes and get inventive. The problem, however, is that Tim needs to prove that some of these hair-brained ideas are actually viable. He hasn't managed to do that yet, and I worry for his studio's future because of it. 
 
If Schafer and Co. can bring to the table an imaginative and well-written, witty game that doesn't feature bad gameplay then that, I feel, will be where it starts. Until then, his talent is equally wasted due to nobody actually playing his games. 
 
Also to elaborate on another point: 
 
There was nothing fundamentally wrong with the hack n' slash or the exploration. The problem lied in the fact that it wasn't fun to play. The RTS elements were just a disaster waiting to happen. However, if the emphasis was on tight combat controls with fluid animation and movement, no latency in button combo commands, and the open world had more things to do in it, I think Brutal Legend would've wound up more of a success. You can call this safe if you want to, but in all honesty, I think it's just good gameplay.
Posted by Jimbo
@KingWilly:   I don't think  the poor gameplay is necessarily down to arrogance, it's probably just beyond them.  Not that I think tighter gameplay would have saved Brutal Legend - because as you say, the RTS elements on a console game were a disaster waiting to happen, and not only that but they made an open-world game about 5 hours long, which just isn't good enough.  The solution would have been to just concentrate on making a GoW clone with Jack Black, but like I said, I don't think Tim Schafer is prepared to be that guy.
 
You have a point though, none of his classics are gameplay focused.  His strength is his imagination, and his stories and settings always have a spark to them that you don't often get.   Where I reckon he could be successful is if he positioned his studio closer to Quantic Dream, and made 'interactive fiction', where quality writing and story is really the whole game.
Posted by Oldirtybearon

  @Jimbo: That would be interesting, no doubt. I had a blast on Indigo Prophecy and am currently waiting for my new PS3 to play Heavy Rain. However, I don't think Tim Schafer has any interest in doing something like that.  
 
Also, I don't think Schafer is arrogant in the sense that he thinks his shit doesn't stink. I think it's more innocuous than that. Like I mentioned in the original post, the dude doesn't strike me as a jerk. The best way I can describe it, I think, is as a more absent-minded kind of arrogance. I doubt he sits at his desk all day stroking his ego, but you can't deny that there is some kind of arrogance to believing you--a designer who had never made an RTS before--can crack the console RTS question when specialized studios like Ensemble and EFFING BLIZZARD couldn't do it.

Posted by Ignor

Good gameplay is entirely subjective, believe it or not.
It's a pity that Brütal Legend didn't live up to your expectations.

Posted by JJWeatherman
@Brendan said:
" Woah woah woah wait a minute...you're Avatar is from Reboot.  That's awesome :D "
Oh my god I had almost totally forgotten about that show!
Posted by toast_burner

Grim Fandango is the best adventure game ever, and the second best game ever (deus ex is the best)  
Psychonauts  is great  as well (probably my favorite platformer ever)
You should definetely try those games

Posted by LiquidPrince

I don't want to exactly continue reading through all of that at the moment, but all I will say is Brutal Legend was pretty terrible in my opinion.