I wouldn't worry about the 3DS.

 See? Look! It's a game and stuff!
Nintendo has been attaching random gimmicks to their products for years, and then abandoning them if they don't stick. Remember GameCube/GBA connectivity? Remember the e-Reader? Neither of those things hung around and people were perfectly in their rights to be skeptical about them. But what made products like the Game Boy Advance and the Nintendo DS sell were that at heart they were just solid upgrades to devices that already did what people wanted them to, with weird additional features that never caught on. The 3DS is like that basically, it's a portable gaming system with the processing power of a Dreamcast (I think) and backwards compatibility. Does it really matter if the 3-D thing doesn't last? What's really important to this thing is that it's basically a stronger version of a device that Nintendo has been selling since the eighties, and quite successfully. 
 
Nintendo has a long history of cautiously upgrading what already works for them. Portables like the Game Boy were always more underpowered than competition like the Game Gear or the PSP, but they had an advantage in that they were able to run on less battery power and were supported by a large library of titles even when Nintendo's consoles weren't. Since those original systems came out, Nintendo has always been a generation or so behind the competition in terms of the raw processing power of their handhelds, but they've stuck to the same strategy of making their devices relatively affordable and not messing with a successful model too much by only adding things that seemed absolutely necessary (color graphics, a backlight). Their slow crawl into the online market has been rather annoying, I'll admit. It would be nice if they decided to actually support the 3DS market... thing with old Game Boy titles the way they supported the Virtual Console. The option of playing old Game Boy games on one system instead of digging them out with my old GBA SP had me excited back when it was suggested that this sort of thing could be found on the DSiWare.
 
 You know it's a Nintendo device when...
The dual screen thing was a big leap last generation, I'll admit. But it sort of stuck. Not every game makes full use of both screens, but at least it's there if somebody has the proper idea for it. This generation they're testing out the 3D thing and if that doesn't work, well, then Nintendo is just going to use the "portable Nintendo console" tag as their selling point like they always have and things are going to move on like nothing ever changed. Nintendo has the strength of their brand name and the fact that they can keep putting out new systems that take advantage of the market as long as they can make them efficient and take advantage of the edge this gives them in the handheld market.
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Posted by OldManLollipop
 See? Look! It's a game and stuff!
Nintendo has been attaching random gimmicks to their products for years, and then abandoning them if they don't stick. Remember GameCube/GBA connectivity? Remember the e-Reader? Neither of those things hung around and people were perfectly in their rights to be skeptical about them. But what made products like the Game Boy Advance and the Nintendo DS sell were that at heart they were just solid upgrades to devices that already did what people wanted them to, with weird additional features that never caught on. The 3DS is like that basically, it's a portable gaming system with the processing power of a Dreamcast (I think) and backwards compatibility. Does it really matter if the 3-D thing doesn't last? What's really important to this thing is that it's basically a stronger version of a device that Nintendo has been selling since the eighties, and quite successfully. 
 
Nintendo has a long history of cautiously upgrading what already works for them. Portables like the Game Boy were always more underpowered than competition like the Game Gear or the PSP, but they had an advantage in that they were able to run on less battery power and were supported by a large library of titles even when Nintendo's consoles weren't. Since those original systems came out, Nintendo has always been a generation or so behind the competition in terms of the raw processing power of their handhelds, but they've stuck to the same strategy of making their devices relatively affordable and not messing with a successful model too much by only adding things that seemed absolutely necessary (color graphics, a backlight). Their slow crawl into the online market has been rather annoying, I'll admit. It would be nice if they decided to actually support the 3DS market... thing with old Game Boy titles the way they supported the Virtual Console. The option of playing old Game Boy games on one system instead of digging them out with my old GBA SP had me excited back when it was suggested that this sort of thing could be found on the DSiWare.
 
 You know it's a Nintendo device when...
The dual screen thing was a big leap last generation, I'll admit. But it sort of stuck. Not every game makes full use of both screens, but at least it's there if somebody has the proper idea for it. This generation they're testing out the 3D thing and if that doesn't work, well, then Nintendo is just going to use the "portable Nintendo console" tag as their selling point like they always have and things are going to move on like nothing ever changed. Nintendo has the strength of their brand name and the fact that they can keep putting out new systems that take advantage of the market as long as they can make them efficient and take advantage of the edge this gives them in the handheld market.