phantomsnake's forum posts

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#1 Posted by phantomsnake (37 posts) -

@soup_menu:

Just tested the new build and it works great! Thanks for the super fast fix!

I did upgrade to Kit Kat when it came out but I downgraded after I realized they removed Flash support and App ops. I know there are ways to get both back now but I honestly don't see any 'must have' features in either Kit Kat or Android L so I'm staying put for now.

#2 Edited by phantomsnake (37 posts) -

I'm seeing the same issue with the missing scrubber. Here's some info:

  • What device are you using? Nexus 7 (2012)
  • What version of Android are you running? Jelly Bean (Build number JWR66Y - this is the official Jelly Bean for this device)
  • How is it failing to scrub?
    • Is the scrubber not showing up? Yes, the scrubber is missing
    • Are you not able to drag the control? N/A
    • If you drag it, does it snap back? N/A
  • Does the issue affect all videos, or only some? All videos
    • Do different qualities behave differently? All qualities (except YouTube)
    • Does it matter if the video has been downloaded? No, scrubber is still missing

Here's a screenshot:

My guess is that the scrubber is hidden underneath the native navigation bar at the bottom of the screen.

I also noticed that the back button at the bottom now requires two taps to actually go back. The one at the top-left takes one tap.

Edit: Tried it on my Nexus 4 as well running the same version of Jelly Bean. Interestingly, on this device the navigation bar is displayed on the right, so the scrubber is visible at the bottom.

Screenshot:

The back button still takes two taps though.

#3 Posted by phantomsnake (37 posts) -

About a year ago I made a small Flash game called Pulse for a contest on Kongregate and you guys helped me make it to the judging round. Pulse went on to win 2nd place in the competition and even received praise from Tetsuya Mizuguchi (the contest was part of a promotion for Child of Eden):

"Classic visual like the Famicon but experiencing the process of sound effects evolving into the music felt really good. The harder the game, the more exciting the music gets--this was blended perfectly." --The Miz

First of all, thanks to everyone who played and rated Pulse last year! You guys really made a difference. Even if Pulse hadn't made top 3, just making it to the judging round and having the Miz play my little flash game was a dream come true!

Recently, I remade Pulse completely for iOS and Android and renamed it Micron (as Pulse was already taken on those platforms).

Micron is a unique reflection based puzzle / rhythm hybrid where you place pieces on a board to guide balls to an exit. Whenever the balls hit objects on the board they make sounds that add to the background music. The game has 51 levels, plus 12 bonus levels, with various sounds themes.

On top of the iOS and Android versions, I just released the game on Desura (with a free demo!) so there's lot's of ways to play it. So please check it out at microngame.com and let me know what you think! And if you like Micron, help me spread the word!

#4 Posted by phantomsnake (37 posts) -

The market fragmentation argument against Ouya doesn't hold up. Developers don't target a specific chipset, they target Android, which is a very well established OS with well supported APIs. The whole point of having an OS is to provide an abstraction layer on top of the hardware and Android does exactly that, just like Windows does for millions of PC part combinations. And no, the Kindle Fire doesn't count as market fragmentation. From a developer's perspective it's just another Android tablet. I actually released a game for the Kindle Fire last week. I released exactly the same version that I have on Google Play. There was zero development work required.

#5 Posted by phantomsnake (37 posts) -

If Ouya is a scam then the people attached to the project have effectively just ended their careers. I seriously doubt they would do that.

Still, I admit I'm skeptical about their ability to deliver, but I think they have a shot.

#6 Posted by phantomsnake (37 posts) -

@EmuLeader said:

I think the premise is kind of hilarious, considering I've never seen anyone have the basis of their story revolve around a computer register input incompatibility. 0x10c is still an odd name though. Depending on the input style, it is either

0x0001 0000 1100 or 0x1100 0000 0001. Neither one of those is the number mentioned in the story, so I wonder what it is supposed to mean.

If you look at the actual logo the C is written as an exponent. So you have 0x10^C, which is hex for 16^12, which is 281,474,976,710,656. This is very close to 281,474,976,712,644 AD, the year the game is set in.

I wonder how you're supposed to say the name though. Sixteen to the twelfth?

#7 Edited by phantomsnake (37 posts) -

@McShank said:

@switchit said:

Please don't assume all of your readers is from the USA.

then where are you from? This was something about it not coming to the US ,, not about it not showing up in other countries..

You're missing the point. The article uses "here" to mean the USA and assumes you will understand that, though "here" means something else for some of us. To be fair, pretty much half the content on the internet is like this.

#8 Posted by phantomsnake (37 posts) -

I answered "probably yeah." I think the most important thing about a game like this is fairness. If the game has randomly generated content, which means you can't memorize the environment and enemy locations like in Dark Souls, you need to make sure that the player always has a fair chance to assess the situation. I.e. I wouldn't play this if you could randomly drop into a pit of spikes or get ambushed without warning. But if you get this right it could be very cool.

Other than that it depends on art style, combat system, controls, etc., the length of the game (no way I'm playing a 20 hour game with perma-death!), and general polish.

#9 Posted by phantomsnake (37 posts) -

Posted a new question.

#10 Edited by phantomsnake (37 posts) -

@Astras: I imagine an FFVII remake would have to be done from scratch at this point. Also, I agree about FFXIII's battle system. It practically played itself.

: Same here. I would prefer to keep my fond memories of FFVII intact. But if I'm being honest, I would still totally play the remake.

: That would explain a lot.

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