SagaciousJones's forum posts

#1 Posted by SagaciousJones (142 posts) -

You're better off getting the PS2 version over the 360 HD version.

Kojima's games use pressure sensitive button inputs--holding the face buttons down soft or hard have different effects. This mechanic is not supported by the 360 controller. They built work-arounds, but it's not as intuitive as the original controls.

PS2 Sustenance has the most content (Snake vs. Monkey, secret theater), but PS3 is probably the most definitive experience.

#2 Edited by SagaciousJones (142 posts) -

@WeaponBoy said:

Is Capcom still insanely protective of their MT Framework engine? I dare anyone to go back to DMC4, RE5, etc. and tell me those games don't look good. You can dislike the style and whatever else, but you're out of your mind if you don't think that what that engine was capable is amazing, especially for a game made five years ago. Maybe after Enslaved NT was just more comfortable in Unreal.

I don't think that's been a thing for years.

http://www.joystiq.com/2009/06/18/capcom-to-provide-mt-framework-2-0-to-its-external-studios/

NT confirmed that MT was an option, but decided they didn't want to spend time learning the tech.

http://press2reset.com/2012/03/22/devil-may-cry-developer-justifies-use-of-unreal-tech/

#3 Posted by SagaciousJones (142 posts) -

@Ubersmake said:

I guess another point to make is that you never have to manage battles. You can micromanage and probably get better results. But the AI is generally competent at prioritizing targets and attacking ships once they get into range. Your fleet composition and reinforcements will, more often than not, determine the outcome of a battle. I personally like to push fleets around and then zoom in and watch the madness when a battle takes place.

Absolutely. As someone who gets exhausted by the APM micro stuff in Starcraft, I love that I can kick back and play Sins like a strategist, focusing on the essential empire management and putting fleets where they need to be, yet still have the ability to dive in and get dirty with tactics in desperate times.

#4 Edited by SagaciousJones (142 posts) -

@CptBedlam said:

1. I loved Master of Orion 2. Is it anything like that game?

Sins is basically a MoO space 4X that's streamlined and sped up to play as a real-time strategy game. You have most of the trappings of the genre: warfare/economy/diplomancy tech trees, multiple planet types to colonize, multiple ship types of varying classes, phase lanes, trade routes and pacts, etc. If you're looking for a 4X experience distilled into a 3-hour match, it's super fun. It's better to check out a gameplay video to see how the battles play out. They tend to devolve into giant ship blobs pounding at each other rather than careful micomanagement.

Edit: found a different video because the voice acting has gotten way better than that.

#5 Edited by SagaciousJones (142 posts) -

@Raven10 said:

But the world is far more interesting than Oblivion or Skyrim, and again, as much content as there is in those games, Morrowind just dwarfed them. And of course Daggerfall dwarfed Morrowind. The games have gotten smaller and smaller as time has gone on and more and more structured.

Ah, but so much of Daggerfall is procedurally generated. I like to be all elitist over how I loved Morrowind before the streamlined sequels because you just can't see the genius, but I'm ashamed that I really could not get back into Daggerfall for probably the exact same reasons that some people can't get back into Morrowind.

I like to use the following analogy:

Skyrim is the Hope Diamond.

Oblivion is an expensive diamond you got at a jewelers.

Morrowind is a diamond you pried from the wall of a cave yourself.

Daggerfall is a gigantic mossy boulder.

Edit: But really, don't force yourself to play it. We all different tastes and want different things from our games. If you want a more balanced ES-like RPG, try Fable 1/2, Fallout 3/New Vegas, Dragon's Dogma, or Kingdoms of Amalur.

#6 Edited by SagaciousJones (142 posts) -

@Apothos said:

tl;dr I need guidance on the aspects of Morrowind that seem to set it apart from Oblivion and Skyrim.

First of all, the lore and the writing of Morrowind is leaps and bounds above anything else the series, much less other RPGs, has to offer. The world of Vvardenfell is designed with a level of political complexity that puts Skyrim to shame. The balance between the three houses, the tribunal, the empire, and so many other figures is absolutely fascinating to learn about, and most quests involve you learning some completely new cultural facet along the way. I honestly put Morrowind right next to Planescape Torment and KOTOR2 on the scale of quality writing. Essays have been written on the depths of Michael Kirkbride's work, but the Elder Scrolls series has been spinning its wheels ever since as none of their writers have lived up to his ability.

http://fallingawkwardly.wordpress.com/2010/08/29/the-metaphysics-of-morrowind-part-1/

http://www.imperial-library.info/content/michael-kirkbrides-texts

http://www.imperial-library.info/content/forum-archives-michael-kirkbride

Second, the art and world design feels very different from anything else in the ES games. Skyrim and Oblivion have undeniably generic Tolkien-esque fantasy settings. There are horses, castles, trolls, giants, skeletons, knights, and so many other staples. In contrast, Morrowind actually feels like a completely alien world. You don't see rabbits or deer or anything you'd reasonably see on earth. The wildlife is populated with giant insects and floating jellyfish, and the architecture is made of magic-sculpted mushrooms and the husks of gigantic monsters. There are elves and orcs, sure, but miles away from genre standard: the elves are all dicks (with complex reasons why they are dicks) and the orcs are noble and misunderstood. Morrowind is creative and wondrous, and also oppressively bleak. It breaks cliche and tries new things in a genre that is so often highly derivative, and it's a shame that its sequels have turned away from that in favor of familiar territory.

Additionally, to address the gameplay, the dungeons actually have a feeling of crafted originality. How many times did you do that wolf/snake/etc. symbol puzzle in Skyrim? How often did you feel that you were running through swapped-out dungeon building blocks? Morrowind dungeons aren't exactly Zelda, but there's very often a unique and deliberate design behind most of them that make them feel actually distinctive as you explore them. I can remember the maps to several, years later. I can't remember a single Oblivion or Skyrim dungeon that wasn't part of the main story.

In summation, Morrowind has so many unique aspects to offer if you have the patience to look for them. There is no excuse for the terrible combat, but you shouldn't let that be a hurdle to experiencing Morrowind's brilliance.

#7 Posted by SagaciousJones (142 posts) -

http://www.polygon.com/2013/1/30/3931784/capcom-devs-describe-the-long-distance-romance-with-ninja-theory-that

The video-game industry is littered with stories of game developers in the U.S. and Europe trying to work with publishers in Japan and finding it a painful experience. While the collaboration between Capcom and England-based Ninja Theory wound up producing the fairly well-reviewed DmC: Devil May Cry, it was far from smooth sailing from start to finish for the three-year-long project.

...

"It was the classic long-distance romance," Eshiro reflected. "We were always the most nervous just before the meeting, and it'd be such a relief afterwards. Development studios working in this kind of client/subcontractor position have a tendency to be really businesslike with their relations, but we had a really close relationship with Ninja Theory. They're really forward-thinking, so it was worth teaching them everything we could."

I'm really interested in seeing more about these East/West developer mash-ups. Have there been other articles telling about, say, Castlevania:LoS (which was a team-up between Konami and Spanish developer MercurySteam)?

#8 Edited by SagaciousJones (142 posts) -

@GERALTITUDE said:

I meant to say that FFVIII has the most varied main scenarios

Plus, there are lots of disguises that you wear in VIII and that's pretty awesome too.

Still, your party members have a lot to say during missions, and their dialogue is pretty specific one person-to the other, so it seems worthwhile to mix and match parties.

Those are all good points that I tend to forget in favor of "Oh, FFVIII!" Thanks for reminding me why I like that game.

Though VII has the best disguise section ever.

#9 Posted by SagaciousJones (142 posts) -

@Ben_Kuchera said:

What I won't do is bring up a game that is being released in an unorthodox fashion and say that you should download the ROM. I think that's a pretty crappy thing to do, and that's why everyone was talking about the post. It's not really an issue of linking to emulators, which is something I've done, and I've written about emulators extensively.

...

When I post bad information, I apologize and explain what went wrong with my fact-checking.

And if you had even bothered to read Kain's article, you would seen that he only endorsed the alternative because he incorrectly assumed that the free available copies of the vaporware game had been put out by creators due to the lack of a commercial release.

I want to make it very clear that I in no way support or advocate piracy. To be quite honest, I assumed that a game like this was on an emulator precisely because it was never released. Since it was never released, I assumed that there was some process that its creators must have gone through to license it out to the websites that hosted it, especially since the one I visited apparently charges a subscription fee after you’ve tried a game a few times.

Either way, my actual intention with this post was to show simply that the game wasn’t new, and that in fact people had been playing it via emulators for some time even though it never was released for the SNES. By all means, if you are someone who owns that old, out-of-production system, I recommend you pay for the game if you want to play it. But up until its release, the only way anyone has ever even tried this game was via emulation.

In other words, I am not advocating “stealing” if something is too expensive. That is not my point, and I think only a very uncharitable reading of this post can come to that conclusion.

You labeling him as a piracy advocate was twisting Kain's words for the purpose of damaging him. Your actions were based on bad information and you have not apologized.

#10 Posted by SagaciousJones (142 posts) -

This might have something to do with it.

Or this fucking thing.

What was with that game and nipples?