SolongWrex's forum posts

#1 Edited by SolongWrex (138 posts) -

"We are excited for Mark and the Facebook team to deliver us literal trucks full of money", said Brendan Iribe, co-founder and CEO of Oculus VR. "We believe our lives will be heavily defined by expensive experiences that require us to spend money in magical, new ways. It's a transformative and disruptive amount of money that enables us to experience the impossible, and it's only just the beginning."

#2 Posted by SolongWrex (138 posts) -

I don't remember a rape attempt. Was it the surprise dude in the cave? That was more like a serial strangler.

#3 Posted by SolongWrex (138 posts) -

Mayo is such an integral part of certain hamburgers and things like potato salad that you don't even think of it as eating mayo. I only got into eating unadulterated mayo in my 20s and there was a time there where I probably took a few years off my life by going through like an 18 oz bottle a week. Just slathered everything with it. Fries? Mayo. Pizza? Mayo. Pre-packaged sandwich from the store? Open it and add more mayo. Pretty dark stuff. I've been tapering off of it since May though. It's a powerful condiment and you need to respect it, lest it take control of you.

#4 Posted by SolongWrex (138 posts) -

I'm 27. I've been lucky to not have anyone close to me die yet, so this is about as shocked as I've ever been in my life. When I saw that article, I felt a physical jolt travel through my body. Lump in my throat, trouble breathing...I mean, however I may wish to rationalize this and tell myself it's just a dude on the Internet, not a huge deal, I can never forget that first reaction of shock, disbelief and emptiness. It's something I've never truly felt before and it's weird and scary.

#5 Posted by SolongWrex (138 posts) -

@solongwrex said:

@vibratingdonkey: Problem for Sony is, this is probably the last few years they can expect to be able to rake in the conservative, always-offline physical media dollar in any significant amount, even though this announcement does offer them quite a bit more breathing room since there's no more uncertainty about the success of Microsoft's alternative model.

Sony may look like they're in a good position, but things can change fast. We're seeing Google Fiber being rolled out, and other providers are already responding with a better product, resulting in faster, cheaper Internet in the USA. As connection speeds and data caps become non-issues, downloading affordable games will suddenly be hugely attractive to a lot of people, and not all of them are going to want to play on Steam. Sony's choice is to ignore this and play it as safe as they possibly can, which leaves them wide open for a competitor to swoop in and dominate that space before we're even halfway through next gen. This could have been Microsoft, but they lost nerve. Nintendo could be in a position to capitalize if they cut their cycle short and come out with a revamped strategy, which I highly doubt. Apple's been rumored to be interested in gaming for a while now, and this could be the opening they're looking for.

In any case, we have two giant companies that are happy to stay their course for the foreseeable. Small, incremental changes to their digital services and pricing are likely to be enough to keep them on top if nothing major happens, but a total paradigm shift a few years from now could be devastating for both of them. Sony, to me, seems more vulnerable, simply because they're now in full customer-pleasing mode after their experience with PS3, and that could leave them unable to commit to big plays.

Considering both consoles are offering day 1 digital downloads, I'm not sure what your problem is here? How is it not "futuristic" if they allow what you want but give others the option for physical discs?

I don't know why forcing digital is so amazing while making it a standard alongside current distribution avenues is so prehistoric?

I guess I came across as having picked a side here. I mean I'd probably go all digital if the price was right, just as I have with the PC, but I've been known to lovingly caress a Steelbook or two from time to time as well. I have no horse in the race, I was simply ruminating on how this could end up hurting the big players.

There's definitely huge value in the digital marketplace, both for consumers and publishers, which I think remains relatively untapped on the console side. Additionally, it's pretty much inevitable that physical media will become less and less desirable to consumers as it has in pretty much every other form of entertainment. Again, could be that Sony and Microsoft are able to handle or even steer the transition. Maybe no one wants to step on their turf and they have an easier time of it. But the potential is there for a third company to do some damage with a superior service.

#6 Edited by SolongWrex (138 posts) -

@vibratingdonkey: Problem for Sony is, this is probably the last few years they can expect to be able to rake in the conservative, always-offline physical media dollar in any significant amount, even though this announcement does offer them quite a bit more breathing room since there's no more uncertainty about the success of Microsoft's alternative model.

Sony may look like they're in a good position, but things can change fast. We're seeing Google Fiber being rolled out, and other providers are already responding with a better product, resulting in faster, cheaper Internet in the USA. As connection speeds and data caps become non-issues, downloading affordable games will suddenly be hugely attractive to a lot of people, and not all of them are going to want to play on Steam. Sony's choice is to ignore this and play it as safe as they possibly can, which leaves them wide open for a competitor to swoop in and dominate that space before we're even halfway through next gen. This could have been Microsoft, but they lost nerve. Nintendo could be in a position to capitalize if they cut their cycle short and come out with a revamped strategy, which I highly doubt. Apple's been rumored to be interested in gaming for a while now, and this could be the opening they're looking for.

In any case, we have two giant companies that are happy to stay their course for the foreseeable. Small, incremental changes to their digital services and pricing are likely to be enough to keep them on top if nothing major happens, but a total paradigm shift a few years from now could be devastating for both of them. Sony, to me, seems more vulnerable, simply because they're now in full customer-pleasing mode after their experience with PS3, and that could leave them unable to commit to big plays.

#7 Edited by SolongWrex (138 posts) -

@chibio said:

@gkhan said:

Did he really use the word "drivatars"?

That's what the Forza developers want to establish at least.

They first had a learning driver called Drivatar in FM1 back in 2005. You could name them (mine was an older German dude called Günther), teach them your driving style and then have them race for you in career mode. I believe they dropped it for subsequent releases, but it was a pretty cool feature and I'm glad they're bringing it back.

#8 Posted by SolongWrex (138 posts) -

@koolaid said:

The world was not ready.

#9 Edited by SolongWrex (138 posts) -

Now that my original Xbox library is more or less complete, I mostly buy new, but rarely on day 1. I might still make a couple of impulse purchases a year if I find myself in a Gamestop and there's something vaguely interesting under €10. At that price point you're not paying that much more for a new game though, so I try to check for those.

I should mention that my city's awesome library system carries fairly recent console releases too. XCOM and Tomb Raider are on my desk right now and I have reservations on Far Cry 3 and Bioshock: Infinite. These four games will cost me a whopping €2 in reservation fees. Pretty good deal. Not for the publisher I suppose, but they still get their royalty checks.

#10 Posted by SolongWrex (138 posts) -

I just wonder how they think they're getting away with all this if it's true that Microsoft implemented their crap partly due to pressure from publishers. MS backing out of their policies would only be sensible at this point, but if Sony has to compromise on any part of what they've just promised, this is all going to backfire terribly.