sprode's forum posts

#1 Edited by sprode (112 posts) -

Don't worry, you're still not American.

#2 Edited by sprode (112 posts) -

I stick to single-player. At least I don't have to pay extra or spend time trying to get into MOBAs or MMOs. No worries then. No disappointing people or dealing with... uhm, less mature audiences.

#3 Edited by sprode (112 posts) -

I always have fond memories of playing through Punch-Out. I can vaguely recall watching my father play and as I recall I watched him lose to Bald Bull. So it was so awesome to not only conquer that game but do it on my own.

There was also erasing my parents' data on StarTropics, but eventually I made it further than they did anyway.

Playing Starcraft all the time.

Oh yeah, taking Pokemon Blue to school with all my friends. We'd trade and and have Metronome battles. We knew an older kid with a Game Genie who got us Mew. I remember helping another kid beat Misty with underleveled pokemon and then we made fun of her for the moves her dumb starfish used.

Used to play Mario with my mom and that's pretty much the last time we'll ever play games since she can't handle newer ones and doesn't have time anyway.

I've got a ton of memories from the N64 era, just discovering Smash or getting afraid of the Stalfos kids in Ocarina or the transformation from 2D to more fully-fleshed worlds.

I wish I could say I had a lot more of those types of memories since then. There are games that shocked me and characters I've loved but it's not quite the same and not when you're only playing alone.

#4 Posted by sprode (112 posts) -

StarTropics

Earthbound/Mother

Banjo-Kazooie

An Assassin's Creed about assassins and doesn't look boring/sucky/filled with monotonous side tasks in order to make yet another "open world" game

Eternal Darkness

A good Metroid (someday...)

#5 Posted by sprode (112 posts) -

I swear Nintendo is dedicated to trolling me.

Or any loyal fanboy.

#6 Edited by sprode (112 posts) -

Bongo Bongo forever

#7 Posted by sprode (112 posts) -

It's like Nintendo keeps trying to piss off its most loyal supporters, such as myself.

#8 Edited by sprode (112 posts) -

Mercedes... yawn.

Link... FUCK YEAH

#9 Posted by sprode (112 posts) -

Please, no Johns.

#10 Edited by sprode (112 posts) -

The point of all of this is is: A study referenced in the article shows most males playing as female avatars do so to gaze and control them, a domineering relationship. Do you, in general, feel that you embody the character you are playing, becoming a different or similar person to yourself, be that in race, gender, sexuality, ethics, or personality? Or do you only identify with similar characters to you? Or do you choose a character to gawk at? Or is it a more complicated mix?

I don't think it's a controlling thing for me. Honestly I think I'm more likely to do a controlling thing when I'm playing as a guy - like in Bioware games when I'm supposed to be deciding between renegade and paragon and what relationship I'm pursuing. Because in that case I'm controlling the character to make the choices I'm inclined to make.

In that case I suppose I embody the character. When I play as female characters I don't feel I embody them, so I guess that would mean I'm domineering them, heh. Although I've never thought of it that way. It's a bit of an opportunity to be someone else, especially when there aren't major personal choices on the line. When I play the Prime series, Samus, it is about identifying with a character similar to me or a feeling (isolation) regardless of gender. Plus she's cool. When I'm playing some random female mage, I'm expressing my usual choice of being a mage but at the same time I'm doing something different by rejecting the need to adhere to strict masculinity. I think there's something to be said for most characters I've played as growing up having been male. Complex games like Elder Scrolls give me an opportunity to be different from myself. Even if there's an overriding personality homogeneity that I have yet to escape. I guess it's a more complicated thing than I'd give it credit for.