StarvingGamer's forum posts

#1 Posted by StarvingGamer (8016 posts) -

@hailinel: Lol yeah that got me excited too

#2 Posted by StarvingGamer (8016 posts) -

@starvinggamer said:

The wiki for this game has a really odd, conversational tone.

Maybe I'll buy it.

Ah, the joys of not even remotely having anything like a style guide on the wiki. One day Jeff will come down from the mountain with that style guide written on two stone tablets. One day.

Snark aside, I do kinda like that about the wiki. You can tell that some user put their own personality into the style of Steamworld Dig article. Somebody should go edit the Bastion article to entirely be in the tone of Rucks, the narrator.

Not gonna lie, I went into the UNIEL wiki and took out most of the conversational language.

#3 Edited by StarvingGamer (8016 posts) -

Ono's panel at SDCC didn't have much to impart about the future of the Street Fighter series other than a series of new "Summer" costumes coming to USFIV including:

  • Rufus in scuba gear
  • Elena in a summer dress
  • Poison in a Chinese dress
  • Dan in golfwear
  • Decapre in a bathing suit
  • Dudley in a school uniform
  • Blanka in Hawaiian garb
  • And more...

Outside of this DLC, Ono said not to expect any more fighting game announcements this year. As a small bonus USFIV players can unlock a special "Capcom Fighters" title for their online player card by entering the following code by going through Player Data > Prize Code on the main menu:

8TGIXJVLEKEHG8

I wonder if they're going to release costumes for all 44 characters, and how they're going to handle the pricing. Hopefully the lot won't cost more than $20, because whatever it is I'm going to pay it.

EDIT: Oh fuck wait they just announced that Street Fighter: Assassin's Fist is getting a sequel, Street Fighter: World Warrior. YO GET HYPE!

#4 Posted by StarvingGamer (8016 posts) -

The wiki for this game has a really odd, conversational tone.

Maybe I'll buy it.

#5 Edited by StarvingGamer (8016 posts) -
#6 Edited by StarvingGamer (8016 posts) -

Also fuck Iron Man 3, The Mandarin should've been played by Chow Yun Fat or Ken Watanabe or something. Yeah, whatever, the film cooked up reasons that it made sense for him to be played by Ben Kingsley, but that was still kinda bullshit.

Then again, the Mandarin is kind of a bullshit character.

As a Chinese guy who speaks very poor Mandarin I admit I was kinda bummed out but intrigued by the notion of Ben Kingsley playing the Mandarin, but then I saw the movie and it made complete sense within the context of the Marvel Cinematic Universe's version of the Mandarin.

Didn't realize until much later that Killian was supposed to be a nod to Fing Fang Foom. Really wanted dumb magic alien rings and a space dragon.

#7 Posted by StarvingGamer (8016 posts) -

@handlas said:

@starvinggamer said:

@handlas said:

And I agree with spray... the game itself is a good movie (tho perhaps he meant that as an insult). It was good as it is and doesn't really need to be a movie unless they change it and, then, what's the point.

Because it's a good story that is worth experiencing, even if you don't play video games. How many people read A Song of Ice and Fire before they watched Game of Thrones? How many decided to read the books after watching Game of Thrones? And the barrier of entry to reading a book is significantly lower than the barrier of entry to playing TLoU for a casual/non-gamer.

Also I'd argue that if you believe the story of TLoU was cliche, so is every other story we've experienced in our lifetimes.

That's the problem with only quoting part of someone's opinion. You completely miss the point of what I was saying.

You were saying that you think the story is only good in the context of "it's a video game story" and I'm saying I think it's worth experiencing outside of a video game. What am I missing? Did you type half of your post with an invisible keyboard?

#8 Posted by StarvingGamer (8016 posts) -

@yummylee said:

That's what I mean, in that The Last of Us is such a memorable game for me specifically because of its perfect blending of the gameplay and story. That moment-to-moment human interaction, that still exists in the game, only it's further accentuated by you yourself controlling the character. I could emphasise with the weariness of Joel all the more because of his somewhat sluggish movement, and the moment when he punctures his stomach after falling on the pipe, having to control Joel while he can barely stand again adds to the sense of not only witnessing but also feeling what's he going through. Not literally feeling what he's going through of course, but it helped add to the effect all the same for me.

It's why I often tend to find myself more attached to video game characters, by virtue of actually having control of them. I wouldn't claim that, say, Marcus Fenix is a better and more engaging character than John McClane in terms of action stars, yet I can't deny that I find myself more attached to Marcus. I feel there's less worth in film than there is video games; sure, movies are often much better written, directed, and are still a more reliable venue for dealing with serious themes. But in the long run what we know is video games is likely to make them almost seem sort of obsolete. Well, maybe obsolete is a little extreme, as you could look at film/TV as something that offers a more guided experience as opposed to the open interactivity of a video game.

Still, the point is I think The Last of Us' success as a story loses a piece of it when adapted to film, and because acting/storytelling in film is of such a higher and more consistent calibre there's a lot more tougher competition out there, that's then likely to have filmgoers wondering what the fuss was all about.

I don't disagree that the gameplay of TLoU is definitely additive to the strength of the entire experience. I don't disagree that some of that would definitely be lost in translating it to film. But that doesn't mean something couldn't be gained as well. To start, ludonarrative dissonance that seems to be a big issue for a number of people is completely eliminated in a filmic format. And no matter how good TLoU looks, that rebar through the gut is never going to be as cringe-worthy as watching the same thing with a real actor and some excellent practical effects.

TLoU is amazing, and a lot of that has to do with its specific strengths as a game, but that doesn't preclude someone from taking the good, non-game-specific parts, and infusing it with all the things you can only accomplish in cinema. A TLoU movie will never be great in the same way the game is great, but there's absolutely nothing about it that would inherently prevent it from being great in the way that movies are great.

#9 Posted by StarvingGamer (8016 posts) -

@yummylee said:

@starvinggamer said:

@handlas said:

And I agree with spray... the game itself is a good movie (tho perhaps he meant that as an insult). It was good as it is and doesn't really need to be a movie unless they change it and, then, what's the point.

Because it's a good story that is worth experiencing, even if you don't play video games. How many people read A Song of Ice and Fire before they watched Game of Thrones? How many decided to read the books after watching Game of Thrones? And the barrier of entry to reading a book is significantly lower than the barrier of entry to playing TLoU for a casual/non-gamer.

Also I'd argue that if you believe the story of TLoU was cliche, so is every other story we've experienced in our lifetimes.

But the story excelled because of the gameplay alongside it. As a film it's likely to function as just another well made post-apocalyptic movie; The Road but with zombies. Plus it's different with books because they're not already visualised with actors, sets, camera work ect, whereas a video game is. Comics too, sorta, because they're elevating comic book storylines & characters from static images into something with voices and movement. They allow more of our senses to partake in its narrative, whereas a game-to-film adaptation actually reduces the number of ways you can engage with a story.

The gameplay wouldn't have had anything to elevate if the story wasn't strong on its own. Having gameplay does not inherently make it a more valid or valuable experience, just look at all the video game adaptations of movies out there. Even the South Park game, that was able to deliver on the feel of the cartoon so well, was not in any way better than the show itself. It was excellent, but the addition of gameplay just made it differently good. The same can be true for TLoU if they are smart about the way they adapt the story from the game to fully take advantage of the movie format. You say "The Road" but with zombies, but how many other quality films can you say that about? That sort of generalization only matters if the plot synopsis is what you watch a movie for. It's about the moment-to-moment human interaction, and the setting of TLoU is an amazing one for that.

#10 Posted by StarvingGamer (8016 posts) -

@hansolol: Figuring out the deck to use was interesting, sure. It was the fight itself that was dull. Seeing that the win is guaranteed but it's going to take 5+ repetitions of the same 3-turn heal-heal-attack rotation to get there just made the fight tedious.

So use a different deck?