I play a game and say stuff about it: God of War: Ghost of Sparta

God of War: Ghost of Sparta is the franchise’s second entry on the PSP. With most of the appeal of this series being the unbelievable sense of scale, you would think that the game on a handheld would lessen the experience.

The thing is, you’d be kind of wrong.
 
God of War translates surprisingly well to the lesser platform. Ghost of Sparta looks a lot better than the previous PSP entry Chains of Olympus, which already looked amazing for the platform. The graphics are very sharp and occasionally look like they’re pretty close to one of the PS2 games. The action is as brutal and violent on a “Oh god he didn’t just do that” level, which is exactly what you’d want out of a God of War game. Boss fights and setpieces all feel suitably epic and grand.

All this might lead you to believe that this is just God of War, again. I started this game with this exact mindset. They are just trying to capitalize on the success of God of War III by quickly releasing a game with the same name on it, which won’t try anything new and will just be more of the same. Turned out, this game is one of Kratos’ best adventures yet.

Ghost of Sparta deserves special mention for it’s storyline. If you’ve never played a God of War game before, then this is a really bad place to start, since the plot is wedged between the original God of War and God of War 2. In Ghost of Sparta, lead man Kratos is as close to a human being as he’s been since the original God of War. One of my main problems with this series since it’s start has been the fact that with each sequel, they’ve gone the Saw route and amping up the blood and guts, and not focusing on the characters and the story, which were very important and very good before. In God of War 3, all that was left of Kratos’ troubled antihero appeal was a man yelling at the things he was murdering. That has been a bummer, because the God of War games have always had a really interesting story to tell, which is surprising considering that the gameplay is about murdering every single thing that moves.

Ghost of Sparta goes back to the roots of the character, and tries to give him back his long lost feeling of emotion. This game addresses the issue of his brother, who got casually mentioned in the first game and was never touched upon again. Kratos actually seems to care about finding his brother and actually wants him to be alive and well, which is a huge step up from his “DIEEEEE” problem solving method of God of War 3.

Often you’ll be walking through areas where you’re not even allowed to use your weapons.

Yes, you read that right.

There are living creatures who don’t need to die in Ghost of Sparta,

That’s something that has never happened in a God of War game before. Even the innocent civillians in previous games gave you health when you killed them god damnit. This time you literally are not allowed to even try and attack some people.
To conclude, yes, it’s more God of War and you know how it works and what you’re going to do in it. I’m not going to argue with that, but it’s about as good as the series has ever been. If you’re a fan, the surprisingly superb plot makes this game worth it alone. If you’re sick of the series, or never liked the games in the first place, this probably won’t change your mind.

 


1 Comments
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Posted by Ventilaator

God of War: Ghost of Sparta is the franchise’s second entry on the PSP. With most of the appeal of this series being the unbelievable sense of scale, you would think that the game on a handheld would lessen the experience.

The thing is, you’d be kind of wrong.
 
God of War translates surprisingly well to the lesser platform. Ghost of Sparta looks a lot better than the previous PSP entry Chains of Olympus, which already looked amazing for the platform. The graphics are very sharp and occasionally look like they’re pretty close to one of the PS2 games. The action is as brutal and violent on a “Oh god he didn’t just do that” level, which is exactly what you’d want out of a God of War game. Boss fights and setpieces all feel suitably epic and grand.

All this might lead you to believe that this is just God of War, again. I started this game with this exact mindset. They are just trying to capitalize on the success of God of War III by quickly releasing a game with the same name on it, which won’t try anything new and will just be more of the same. Turned out, this game is one of Kratos’ best adventures yet.

Ghost of Sparta deserves special mention for it’s storyline. If you’ve never played a God of War game before, then this is a really bad place to start, since the plot is wedged between the original God of War and God of War 2. In Ghost of Sparta, lead man Kratos is as close to a human being as he’s been since the original God of War. One of my main problems with this series since it’s start has been the fact that with each sequel, they’ve gone the Saw route and amping up the blood and guts, and not focusing on the characters and the story, which were very important and very good before. In God of War 3, all that was left of Kratos’ troubled antihero appeal was a man yelling at the things he was murdering. That has been a bummer, because the God of War games have always had a really interesting story to tell, which is surprising considering that the gameplay is about murdering every single thing that moves.

Ghost of Sparta goes back to the roots of the character, and tries to give him back his long lost feeling of emotion. This game addresses the issue of his brother, who got casually mentioned in the first game and was never touched upon again. Kratos actually seems to care about finding his brother and actually wants him to be alive and well, which is a huge step up from his “DIEEEEE” problem solving method of God of War 3.

Often you’ll be walking through areas where you’re not even allowed to use your weapons.

Yes, you read that right.

There are living creatures who don’t need to die in Ghost of Sparta,

That’s something that has never happened in a God of War game before. Even the innocent civillians in previous games gave you health when you killed them god damnit. This time you literally are not allowed to even try and attack some people.
To conclude, yes, it’s more God of War and you know how it works and what you’re going to do in it. I’m not going to argue with that, but it’s about as good as the series has ever been. If you’re a fan, the surprisingly superb plot makes this game worth it alone. If you’re sick of the series, or never liked the games in the first place, this probably won’t change your mind.