Viqor's comments

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Edited by Viqor

@vinny What processor did you end up getting? I couldn't make it out in the video.

Posted by Viqor

huh. They changed the Playstation ding that used to be at the end of every episode.

Posted by Viqor

Thanks for the code, Patrick (grabbed code 4). Love worth reading and look forward to it and worth playing every week.

Posted by Viqor

Thanks guys. This is really great

Posted by Viqor

Welcome to Game Impressions (It's kind of a lul) Daily, a look at games and how our opinions of them change over time, even while in the midst of playing them.

So I unlocked all of the weapons in the knight class and obtained the veteran helment, for what its worth (not much, since you can't even see it). I can't say exactly why I keep playing Chivalry: the unlock system isn't particularly deep (kills for unlocks) and there is no tangible benefit to leveling up, not that any of that matters much next to the limited number of levels and the mostly uninteresting non-objective based modes. So why do I continue to play? My friends are probably part of it, but it can't be the whole story: I favor single player games and there have been plenty of times that I've moved on from the latest multiplayer offering long before my friends are done with it. Maybe it's the simplicity of the objectives: everyone is working towards the same goal so even with minimal teamwork, there is never any question as to what you are supposed to be doing. Perhaps its the unique gameplay that makes the playing field feel much more even than nearly any shooter could ever hope to do, or maybe bashing someone's skull in with an iron stick is just more satisfying than a head shot. Either way, I'm still playing the game, and consistently having a good time with it.
Posted by Viqor

Welcome to Game Impressions (Sorta) Daily, a look at games and how our opinions of them change over time, even while in the midst of playing them.

Now that I've finally gotten around to doing story missions, I find that I'm treating them exactly the same way as side quests: as a way to unlock things. I reached the point where I had no more abilities to unlock and I really wanted to play with fire arrows. The solution to both: the story. I can honestly say that I have nearly no interest in what Ubisoft wants to say with Far Cry 3 beyond "Vaas is an awesome villain," but the missions themselves seem compitent enough, although they are unfortunately much more linear than the sidequests. Now that I have unlocked the next tier of skills and the beautifully chaotic fire arrows, I suspect that it may be some time before I attempt to tackle the next story beat.
Posted by Viqor

Welcome to Game Impressions (not really) Daily, a look at games and how our opinions of them change over time, even while in the midst of playing them.

Expectedly, The Line was not a particularly long game so I managed to finish it up in two 3-4 hour stints. Much of what I had observed in the first half remained roughly true through the rest of the game: although saddled with mediocre mechanics the game design actively supports the twisted narrative excellently, as do the audio and visuals. One touch I quite liked was that the call-outs that your character makes for each kill change over the course of the game, going from calm and composed to viscous and aggressive as he becomes more and more unhinged. The story progresses in much the same way, making a violent downward spiral towards a rather shocking, but pointed conclusion. Without revealing too much, the questionable sanity of the protaganist is put front and center and the themes of personal accountibility and shifting responsibility, most notably seen before now in the imfamous "white phosphorus" scene, but exploerd throughout the game, are given their ultimate dues. The writing is very strong and while its certainly not pleasant, Spec Ops challenges and requires thoughfulness in a way that very few games have even attempted, and for that it absolutely deserves to be played, flaws and all.
Posted by Viqor

@DeF: I haven't played much past the point where I was when I wrote that post, so about when you return from the city after assaulting the Gurak base. I've been bogged down in games over the past couple of months, so I'm kind of in the same position you were, although I'll probably go back to it soon since releases are slowing down for the next couple of months. Once I finish this, I'm probably going to play Xenoblade (I'm glad I actually found a copy for a reasonable price at this point), and I just hope its half as good as I've heard.

Posted by Viqor

Welcome to Game Impressions Daily, a look at games and how our opinions of them change over time, even while in the midst of playing them.

Alright, so to start off: I know what I'm getting into with Spec Ops: The Line. I suspect that pretty much everyone playing the game nowadays kind of does. Does that mean that my experience will be diminished over those who got to play the game "pure," not knowing the depths that laid in store for them? I can't answer that question, but I can at least come at the game from the perspective of someone just waiting for shit to get crazy. Honestly, I didn't have to wait as long as I thought I would. Aside from the very "dudebro" on-rails helicopter sequence at the beginning, the game never feels like it's attempting COD-style spectacle, even to lull you into a false sense of security. Playing even an hour of The Line is enough to convince anyone that they're involved in something different. There's a sort of grim brutality to the gameplay: limited ammunition force you to close in to switch weapons or result to melee, enemies don't always die right away enabling you to finish them off, if you wish, in brutal fashion, and even a that even just a couple of hours in, the pile of corpses, both the ones that you see and the ones that you create, has grown to uncomfortable levels. Of course, the real reason that anyone is still talking about Spec Ops is the story. Pretty much right away, the tone and setting of the game help to set it apart from other brown shooters that have been released over the past several years. Sure, it takes place in a desert, but it takes place in Dubai, one of the most prosperous cities in the middle-east, now layed low by natural and, you quickly find out, man made disaster. The city, now cut off from the rest of the world, lends to the feeling of isolation, as if the two men that you learn to rely on in combat (through simple squad commands), are the only people in the world that you can trust. This is further emphasized during the short time I spend separated from them during one level. I suddenly felt trapped and easily surrounded by the enemy, almost overwhelmed, and a little bit frustrated: I think that was the point. The game design supports the story so well that its a shame that the mechanics don't fare better. The shooting and cover mechanics are competent and functional, very much in the style of Gears of War, and utterly bland. Weapons generally lack weight and impact and the vast majority of battles take place behind one or two pieces of cover each. You only really need to move when you run out of ammo, and when you do have to go for melee, the act feels so ineffective that I started to wonder if I could even kill an opponent with it.
Posted by Viqor

Welcome to Game Impressions Daily, a look at games and how our opinions of them change over time, even while in the midst of playing them.

A new year, a new game. Every year I try to start things off right by playing something that I haven't gotten the chance to play yet. This year, I have a lot of things to choose from, but because a bunch of my friends were over and we all had the game, we decided that Torchlight II would be that game. To the surprise of no one, Torchlight II shares an awful lot in common with it's predecessor, but more so. It's very much an incremental sequel: bigger world, more customization, better visuals, and and a host of other small improvements that make the game significantly, if unspectacularly, better than its predecessor. That is, with the exception of multiplayer which, while being the most obvious of features to add, is also the most important and far-reaching of the game's many improvements. Unfortunately, Torchlight II doesn't sport the amazingly seamless multiplayer integration that Diablo III had, on the other hand, it seems to do everything else right, up to and including not requiring an internet connection to play with people in the same house. The normal trappings of good click and loot multiplayer are all present: individual loot drops for each player (something Borderlands 2 neglected to have), scaling difficulty, randomized dungeons and over-worlds (complete with a handy "reroll world" option on the server screen if you want to replay old areas) and, of course, dancing. Because what's the point if you can't make your character look like an idiot. In all honesty, I don't think Torchlight II is anything I haven't seen before. And if I wasn't playing with my friends, I doubt that I would make it past the first few hours before thinking to myself "I've already played two of these in the past years (Diablo III, Borderlands 2), why bother with a third." But here I am, playing that third loot-based RPG of the past year, and liking it, because it gives me a chance to do something with my friends for the next few weeks/ months.
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