zombie2011's forum posts

#1 Edited by zombie2011 (4968 posts) -

@sergio said:

@zombie2011 said:

"Ford/GM don't own their own plants" I stopped reading their you have no knowledge of the manufacturing world.

I don't know the specifics about Ford/GM, but I do know the Chrysler Group owns some of their plants. There may be others where they lease the land and building, but they are still managed by Chrysler. While Ford/GM might not "own" their own plants, they are managing them. They determine which model is manufactured at each plant, and what shifts are working. These aren't fast food franchises not owned by McDonald's or manufacturers like Foxconn.

Completely false statement right there. Like i said i work for a tier one supplier for the automotive industry and we own all our plants. The only thing Ford/GM/Chrysler/Honda etc own are the shipping racks we send parts to them in. We have a several plants that supports the Chrysler plant in Toledo Ohio and we own the building and the several others surrounding it completely. This is my job, this is what i'm in charge of so i know what i'm talking about, who is talking about Mcdonalds and Foxconn except you? Also i've traveled around many plants that manufacture all types of products as part of best practices we have an electronics divsion that works the exact same way we do.

#2 Posted by zombie2011 (4968 posts) -

@zombie2011 said:

As a mechanical engineer who has worked in a manufacturing plant for about 5 years, you can stop production lines anytime you want with little cost. They are called planned shutdowns. GM goes through it every year during the summer, most plant operations are shutdown and the employees are put on voluntary layoff until full production returns after a couple months. This is to stop overproduction which is much more costly than just shutting down operations for a while until inventory is reduced. No one can predict customer demand, so processes are built to be highly adaptable. This method of manufacturing has been used since Ford/Toyoda were alive, Lean/Kaizen/Six Sigma whatever you call it it's about being proactive instead of reactive and that is what MS is doing here by halting production.

Also times are far from dire at MS the company is doing better than ever since Satya took over. Xbox is just a small part of MS while unfortunately for Sony the Playstation is the only thing that is keeping that company afloat.

Ford/GM owns their own plants, console manufacturers always have an (at least) one-year contract with contracted manufacturing plants. Times are dire for the xbox (brand), not Microsoft as a whole. Latest reports are 5m shipped but only 4.2m sold. That means 800k unsold globally (though effectively in the states) with manufacturing plants pumping out 200k (by estimated of known XB1 plants) a month. Couple that with the recent fire sales with XB1 & Titanfall (+Forza) bundles and unofficial price cuts.

It's funny how they wind down XB1 manufacturing to stop flooding the U.S. market but still can't launch officially in (82% of) Europe yet. That is dire.

"Ford/GM don't own their own plants" I stopped reading their you have no knowledge of the manufacturing world.

#3 Posted by zombie2011 (4968 posts) -

@sergio said:

@zombie2011: I think you've completely ignored the last paragraph he's quoting.

I grew up with family and friends working at a car plant, so I'd agree that it's completely possible to halt production for a while or reduce the amount produced by reducing the number of shifts. I don't know if it's changed since then, but it still cost the car manufacturer something for producing nothing, or more than what they output.

That said, there is a difference between a car manufacturer reducing or stopping production at its own plants and a company asking their manufacturing and distribution partners to reduce or stop production. There are contracts in place, so if this is true, Microsoft would likely still be paying more per unit than what is actually produced. I don't think this will really affect Microsoft unless they had very terrible lawyers when drawing up these contracts, and I highly doubt that.

I didn't ignore the last paragraph, and i don't work for GM, i was using them as an example because their layoff also effects our plants but not in a negative way. I work for a tier 1 supplier who makes parts for pretty much every major car company. They do not pay more for parts when we stop producing parts for them then start back up production that is complete BS. Also "their is no speed adjustment" is the dumbest thing I've heard, the whole idea of modern manufacturing is being able to hit variable takt times due to customer demand. When they give us a contract we are expected to be able to adapt to their demand, MS is a better run company than Chrysler, GM and Ford so i'm 100% sure they also do not have a defined production quantity in their contracts. The guy he is quoting works in the IT department and he has "perspective on this" I on the other hand am the process engineer who designs the assembly process, so i think i know more than him.

After reading what i said i know i sound like a dick but it's saturday i'm drunk so i don't care, however, that doesn't mean what i wrote isn't correct.

#4 Edited by zombie2011 (4968 posts) -
@trafalgarlaw said:
@korwin said:

From BGR

Although the Xbox One’s success has been repeatedly overshadowed by the dominance of the PlayStation 4, Microsoft CFO Amy Hood hinted in a recent earnings call that market saturation for the new console might be approaching sooner than expected.Gamasutra reports that Microsoft shipped 1.2 million Xbox Ones in the third fiscal quarter (January 1st – March 31st), which contributed heavily to the 41% year-over-year increase in revenue for Microsoft’s Devices and Consumer Hardware division. Unfortunately, it appears that those millions of Xbox One consoles aren’t exactly flying off the shelves.

During the earnings call, Hood said that Microsoft “expect[s] to work through some inventory in Q4 [April 1st - June 30th],” mentioning “channel inventory drawdown for Xbox consoles.” From Gamasutra’s perspective, Hood’s statement implies that Microsoft may slow or even stop Xbox One production altogether until demand picks up. We know that the company has shipped 5 million consoles to retailers since launch, but Microsoft hasn’t been as forthcoming with actual end user sales data.

No, this doesn't mean that the Xbox One is being killed off.

For everyone saying this is no big deal, you gravely do not understand modern manufacturing. Before I begin, I'm just talking about manufacturing realities, the console is probably going to be fine. I work in IT for a place that does manufacturing internal and external so I have some perspective on this.

Manufacturing plants aren't just some willy wonka magic fantasy place. Production lines have to be specced, assembled, staffed, and set in motion for a predetermined speed for a predetermined about of time. There isn't a speed adjustment. If you want to produce less of something, its a costly retooling of the entire line. Unless you can somehow fill production arms with similar product, say like Apple did with the Ipad 3 by fitting in the very similar Ipad 2, this is a worse case scenario. This is more costly oops than the red ring of death. Most of the time, when a product isn't selling at the rate it was expected, companies will just warehouse the extra. if they don't sell, then eventually they clearance the inventory out because even warehouses cost significant money over time. Another option is just destroy the extra inventory as it comes of the boat and hope demand picks up so you can stop doing that. Those options are still cheaper than going to the manufacture and asking for less product or even stopping production early.

When a company asks a manufacture to stop or reduce production two things are likely going to happen. The company will have to pay the manufacture for all unproduced units even though they weren't produced nor will be delivered. The manufacture will then charge significantly more to produce any future units at less quantity. They may even be an extra fee on top of that because why not? Also the manufacturer may refuse to work with you on future products.

Taken from this excellent post.

Times are dire if they overflooded the market, I smell a price cut incoming @E3.

As a mechanical engineer who has worked in a manufacturing plant for about 5 years, you can stop production lines anytime you want with little cost. They are called planned shutdowns. GM goes through it every year during the summer, most plant operations are shutdown and the employees are put on voluntary layoff until full production returns after a couple months. This is to stop overproduction which is much more costly than just shutting down operations for a while until inventory is reduced. No one can predict customer demand, so processes are built to be highly adaptable. This method of manufacturing has been used since Ford/Toyoda were alive, Lean/Kaizen/Six Sigma whatever you call it it's about being proactive instead of reactive and that is what MS is doing here by halting production.

Also times are far from dire at MS the company is doing better than ever since Satya took over. Xbox is just a small part of MS while unfortunately for Sony the Playstation is the only thing that is keeping that company afloat.

#5 Posted by zombie2011 (4968 posts) -

2 and Brotherhood were the best followed by Revalations.

Once the games left the large cities for the woods and shanty towns of 3 and 4 i lost interest in the series. One of my favorite things about the games was just walking around the cities and looking at all the historical buildings and stuff. 3 and 4 lost this.

#6 Edited by zombie2011 (4968 posts) -

Mass Effect 2 opening.

Halo 3 first scarab battle, playing 4 player co-op with my friends and it was insane just the amount of variety their is in taking that thing down.

MW2 Shepard betrayal, also saving Price. That game was just full of great moments

#7 Posted by zombie2011 (4968 posts) -

I really want a lumia 1020, i bought a 5s last year but i think i'm going to change to the Winodows eco system. I got rid of my macbook pro and now have a windows 8 laptop so it would probably sync better with my current stuff.

My current Siri voice is the british guy and he sounds dumb, i don't use Siri often but when i do it's doesn't work that well.

#8 Posted by zombie2011 (4968 posts) -

Infamous Second Son.

One of the worst Open Worlds i can remember, nothing about it was memorable. After i beat AC 2 and Brotherhood i still spent hours in the world just looking at stuff, same can be said for GTA 5 and Skyrim. For how short the game felt Second Son could have used a better or more unique world.

#9 Posted by zombie2011 (4968 posts) -

@crithon said:

Microsoft is an odd company, you have guys who talk out loud about wanting to cut out XBox division and focus on Office.

whats so weird about that? That is what companies do, it's called re-structuring. Sony sold their PC division to focus on their TV line.

#10 Edited by zombie2011 (4968 posts) -

Some are already calling the generation for Sony. It's way to early for that, but I'm really curious what Microsoft's plan is to recover lost ground.

Without competition, Sony could easily revert to the mentality that they dominate the market and dictate the rules.

Far from over, Sony as a company is crumbling. While MS is killing it, their stock hit 14 year highs today. The market hasn't been this bullish on MS since the tech bubble of '99.

MS still has the 4th largest R&D budget in the world. What i'm trying to say is MS has the capital to spend for exclusives, while Sony can't. The longer this generation goes the more we will see the overall companies outlook change the gaming space.