Sacred 2 Initiation- Part 1

Posted by raddevon (437 posts) -

My wife Tiffany and I just tonight began our crawl through Sacred 2--a game not without a learning curve but lacking quite a lot in the way of a tutorial. The game was originally released on the PC, but we are playing on the Xbox 360 port of the game. After the opening cinema, the player is thrust into the action with little explanation. I plan to outline some of my difficulties in the game, tell if and how I overcame them, and give some impressions. This is part review (albeit with only about an hour of playtime), part introduction to the conventions of the game.

I started a campaign of shadow. Right after my character hit the game world, Tiffany hit start on her controller. I had the luxury of the "full" character creation which allowed me to really take my time choosing my class and God. She had not yet created a character so she was forced through a sparse character creation upon joining. It also seemed that I could not attack while her character creation was taking place. Luckily, the enemies that had begun attacking me retreated after getting a few cheap shots. I had chosen the Inquisitor which is a shadow-only class. This forced Tiffany to also take the shadow path for her chosen class. I had wondered how the game might handle this. I assume it would be impossible to co-op the Inquisitor with the Seraphim which is a class that can only choose the light path.

The game did not explicitly tell me where to go. The mini-map displays a golden arrow pointing toward the objective of your main quest although this is never stated in-game. A more careful exploration of the instruction manual beforehand would have revealed this, but I have been spoiled by many modern games that would spell this out in-game instead.

The game's menus are deep for a console game. This game was obviously conceived as a PC game, and this port is not at all dumbed down from that which makes navigating a bit cumbersome. I will say, though, that expansive menus have been ported over in the best way possible. It may take players an hour or so to become acclimated, but the depth afforded them by this concession is considerable.

After realizing that the Back button summons the map, I figured out the location of the objective for my main quest and started heading in that direction. Along the way, I fought a few enemies--usually no more than two at a time--and even gained a level. The game informs the player that there are attribute points to spend, and a quick trip to the menu screen allows the user to assign the point with ease. However, I don't remember being told that I also had skill points that could be used as well.

It is often difficult to find a path to your destination even though the map reveals it to only be a few feet away. It may be at a lower or higher elevation, or it might be obscured by some obstacle. Sometimes, you have to make quite a trek to get to a point that is actually very close because you have to find a path that will actually get you there. It makes me appreciate the intent of Fallout 3's map system in which you are provided with a path that will theoretically get you to your current waypoint. Actually, this game could stand to borrow a couple of things from the Fallout 3 map... like waypoints in general.

I took a quest which asked that I take an NPC into battle with me to free some of his friends. Our entire party died in the process leaving the quest with an "X" next to it in my quest guide. The guide stated that the NPC had been kiiled and that I should report this to his Lieutenant. I cannot make this the active quest, I assume, because it was failed, but I have no idea how to get to his Lieutenant to report his death. I assume this quest is stuck in purgatory until I happen to stumble across the fellow.

A strange thing happened on our first trip into a dungeon. We passed a certain point and were told to find a magical hiding place. We began hitting the nearby walls thinking we might open a passage of some sort before deciding to give up and move on. As we proceeded down the corridor, text was displayed on the screen labeling the magical hiding place in a fashion similar to the game's labels of loot as if we had just picked up the magical hiding place. I still don't understand what happened. Did we find it?

Picking up loot is oddly a mystery. Loot will sometimes drop that I cannot pick up by passing over it. In these instances, my wife can usually pick up the loot. I assume this is the game's way of preventing either of us from loot-hogging. The most puzzling thing is that, in some cases, passing over this loot pops up a message that the loot is reserved with a countdown to the time when it is no longer reserved. In most cases, this never occurs. I instead receive no feedback as to why I cannot pick up the item.

Although this may seem like a giant bitch-session, I thoroughly enjoyed the game. This is a rare modern game that leaves much of the game a mystery opting instead to allow (or force, depending on your perspective) the player to learn by doing and by--gasp!--reading the manual! I'm sure I will be giving this game much more playtime as it is a rare game that both Tiffany and I enjoy playing together. I plan to continue these posts outlining aspects of the game that perplex me as well as general observations. I hope you enjoy the posts!

#1 Posted by raddevon (437 posts) -

My wife Tiffany and I just tonight began our crawl through Sacred 2--a game not without a learning curve but lacking quite a lot in the way of a tutorial. The game was originally released on the PC, but we are playing on the Xbox 360 port of the game. After the opening cinema, the player is thrust into the action with little explanation. I plan to outline some of my difficulties in the game, tell if and how I overcame them, and give some impressions. This is part review (albeit with only about an hour of playtime), part introduction to the conventions of the game.

I started a campaign of shadow. Right after my character hit the game world, Tiffany hit start on her controller. I had the luxury of the "full" character creation which allowed me to really take my time choosing my class and God. She had not yet created a character so she was forced through a sparse character creation upon joining. It also seemed that I could not attack while her character creation was taking place. Luckily, the enemies that had begun attacking me retreated after getting a few cheap shots. I had chosen the Inquisitor which is a shadow-only class. This forced Tiffany to also take the shadow path for her chosen class. I had wondered how the game might handle this. I assume it would be impossible to co-op the Inquisitor with the Seraphim which is a class that can only choose the light path.

The game did not explicitly tell me where to go. The mini-map displays a golden arrow pointing toward the objective of your main quest although this is never stated in-game. A more careful exploration of the instruction manual beforehand would have revealed this, but I have been spoiled by many modern games that would spell this out in-game instead.

The game's menus are deep for a console game. This game was obviously conceived as a PC game, and this port is not at all dumbed down from that which makes navigating a bit cumbersome. I will say, though, that expansive menus have been ported over in the best way possible. It may take players an hour or so to become acclimated, but the depth afforded them by this concession is considerable.

After realizing that the Back button summons the map, I figured out the location of the objective for my main quest and started heading in that direction. Along the way, I fought a few enemies--usually no more than two at a time--and even gained a level. The game informs the player that there are attribute points to spend, and a quick trip to the menu screen allows the user to assign the point with ease. However, I don't remember being told that I also had skill points that could be used as well.

It is often difficult to find a path to your destination even though the map reveals it to only be a few feet away. It may be at a lower or higher elevation, or it might be obscured by some obstacle. Sometimes, you have to make quite a trek to get to a point that is actually very close because you have to find a path that will actually get you there. It makes me appreciate the intent of Fallout 3's map system in which you are provided with a path that will theoretically get you to your current waypoint. Actually, this game could stand to borrow a couple of things from the Fallout 3 map... like waypoints in general.

I took a quest which asked that I take an NPC into battle with me to free some of his friends. Our entire party died in the process leaving the quest with an "X" next to it in my quest guide. The guide stated that the NPC had been kiiled and that I should report this to his Lieutenant. I cannot make this the active quest, I assume, because it was failed, but I have no idea how to get to his Lieutenant to report his death. I assume this quest is stuck in purgatory until I happen to stumble across the fellow.

A strange thing happened on our first trip into a dungeon. We passed a certain point and were told to find a magical hiding place. We began hitting the nearby walls thinking we might open a passage of some sort before deciding to give up and move on. As we proceeded down the corridor, text was displayed on the screen labeling the magical hiding place in a fashion similar to the game's labels of loot as if we had just picked up the magical hiding place. I still don't understand what happened. Did we find it?

Picking up loot is oddly a mystery. Loot will sometimes drop that I cannot pick up by passing over it. In these instances, my wife can usually pick up the loot. I assume this is the game's way of preventing either of us from loot-hogging. The most puzzling thing is that, in some cases, passing over this loot pops up a message that the loot is reserved with a countdown to the time when it is no longer reserved. In most cases, this never occurs. I instead receive no feedback as to why I cannot pick up the item.

Although this may seem like a giant bitch-session, I thoroughly enjoyed the game. This is a rare modern game that leaves much of the game a mystery opting instead to allow (or force, depending on your perspective) the player to learn by doing and by--gasp!--reading the manual! I'm sure I will be giving this game much more playtime as it is a rare game that both Tiffany and I enjoy playing together. I plan to continue these posts outlining aspects of the game that perplex me as well as general observations. I hope you enjoy the posts!

#2 Posted by Claude (16254 posts) -

I checked your profile after I read your blog. I'm from North Carolina, Hickory to be exact, nice to find your blog. Sacred 2 does seem oddly addictive. Good gaming, I'll be reading.

#3 Edited by raddevon (437 posts) -
@Claude: Thanks for dropping a comment. We aren't too far from one another. I'm not entirely surprised that I enjoy it because Diablo and Diablo 2 ate my life for a few months each. It is quite a bit different from what I have come to expect, but I find myself enjoying the discovery although I worry there will be some facets of the game I will just never know about.

I will try to keep these coming and at least somewhat entertaining for you. Thanks again!
#4 Posted by pweidman (2297 posts) -

Very addictive game.  Gamefaqs will help alot btw.  Sacred 2 consumed my summer(maxed it gp wise), and now it's a bit perplexing to find another game to fill the whole.  Have fun w/this game and it's amazing ability to find yur hidden OCD tc(s), lol.:-)

#5 Edited by raddevon (437 posts) -
@pweidman: I'm afraid my OCD is probably not as hidden as I'd like! ;-)

This is probably far too obvious, but have you played Fallout 3?

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