Just got the game any advice for a new comer?

#1 Posted by The_Laughing_Man (13629 posts) -

So I just got this game *thanks to the steam gift thread*

I have never played a civ game and would happily accept any tips people have. I was given the game of the year edition.

Thank you for all your tips.

#2 Edited by Winternet (8014 posts) -

I remember it having a decent tutorial. Go and play that and then if you feel the need, come and ask for advice. If it's true you haven't had any CIV experience before, any tips now won't make much sense.

#3 Posted by Dolphin_Butter (1915 posts) -

As I'm sure a lot of people will say, the tutorial in this game is pretty good. After that, I'd recommend playing on the lowest difficulty then continually going up. Each successive difficulty requires you to have a better understanding of the game's depth, so don't be discouraged if other civs put your back against the wall at some point. Also, I feel like the French and Egyptians are good civs to start with, then maybe the Celts if you want to have any focus on religion.

#5 Edited by The_Laughing_Man (13629 posts) -

Get the gods expansion adds tons of new stuff makes the game even better. Also I would keep the map size and difficulty low for your first game or at least till you figure out the systems.

What does it add? and about how much is it?

#6 Posted by GERALTITUDE (3229 posts) -

I really hate the tutorial. So... I disagree with all the advice you've been given :P

Problem with the tutorial is how micro-level it is. Really there is nothing in there to guide on managing a civilization. This is really hard advice to give and I suck at the game so I'm no use either. This is the equivalent of a sports game telling you where to find the Blitz play but not when to use it.

Best I can say for you is don't expand very fast, keep your cities relatively close (enough so you can move troops between them quickly when enemies approach). My other tip is don't put the game to it's slowest speed the first time. I've done this over and over again and I've never even seen past the year 1500 AD. By that point I'm just totally wrung out. If you're smart, you're questioning all my advice very carefully...

I guess just play it, shit.

#7 Edited by Bishna (334 posts) -

Don't be ashamed to play on a super low difficulty at first. I have put in over 1000 hours in the series but have never won a game over 6 difficulty. Also military victories may be the sexiest, but they are also extremely difficult and frustrating.

#8 Edited by SathingtonWaltz (2053 posts) -

@the_laughing_man said:

@deathswind said:

Get the gods expansion adds tons of new stuff makes the game even better. Also I would keep the map size and difficulty low for your first game or at least till you figure out the systems.

What does it add? and about how much is it?

It adds religion and espionage mechanics, along with more civilizations to play and a few more unit types and technologies. It's basically required if you want to enjoy Civ V to its fullest.

Also for general tips I recommend starting with "tall" civilizations first before you try a "wide" one. They're easier to manage and defend.

#9 Edited by hollitz (1506 posts) -

Civ 5 was my first Civ game and I've clocked over 250 hours into it at this point. My first game was just me and one other civ on the lowest difficulty setting. I think that's a good way to start, just so you get an idea for the general flow of the game. Don't worry about learning every single thing right away. I was still learning well after my first 100 hours. Next game, bump up to a higher difficulty and maybe add a few more other civs.

#10 Posted by The_Laughing_Man (13629 posts) -

I have a few questions. Do I only need to connect cities with roads?

Is the number of certain materials limited? Like horses iron oil and what not?

Should I keep wonders in one city or spread them out ( the ones you can only have one of)

Is it better to annex or make places a puppet?

Should I take over city states or befriend them?

#11 Edited by Nivash (241 posts) -

@the_laughing_man:

1) Yes, that gives you trade routes which boosts your income. You don't need roads to resources as long as they are within your territory. Apart from that, at times it can be useful to build roads to strategic areas if you want to be able to transport military units quickly or to friendly city states if they request them.

2) Yes, and no. There are a limited number scattered throughout the map and they in turn, once developed with the correct structures, produce a set number of available resources for use that you can see at the top bar. But once you have them they don't go away. If, say, you used a horse to build a mounted unit that horse resource with be available to you again if the unit is killed. This means that if a horse tile gives you two horse resources then it can support two simultaneous mounted units, but this can be replenished indefinitely.

3) There's no direct answer to this as it depends on the wonder and the city. Wonders should be matched with what the city does: wonders producing gold in economic cities, culture wonders in culture cities, military wonders in military cities and so forth. But you need to balance this with how long it takes to produce them to avoid some other player building them first. This often results in production heavy cities often becoming wonder heavy. Use Great Engineers to build wonders in appropriate cities that otherwise wouldn't be able to build them on their own.

4) It depends on the situation. Puppets produce less unhappiness but doesn't allow you to customize their build orders. Personally I usually make a lot of puppet cities during military campaigns to avoid a happiness crash and then convert them back into annexed cities once I have the happiness to support them. But at times you need to annex cities immediately if they are strategically important to the campaign.

5) Again, depends on your overall strategy and the civilization you play. I say befriend as many as you can and conquer as many as you can afford, but avoid conquering too many unless you're going for a military victory since conquering city states turn opposing civilizations and other city states against you. Also keep an eye on the relationship between the city state and neighboring civs. If they are friendly towards one another you can spark an unwanted war. If you attack protected city states this is all but guaranteed.

#12 Posted by The_Laughing_Man (13629 posts) -

@nivash said:

@the_laughing_man:

1) Yes, that gives you trade routes which boosts your income. You don't need roads to resources as long as they are within your territory. Apart from that, at times it can be useful to build roads to strategic areas if you want to be able to transport military units quickly or to friendly city states if they request them.

2) Yes, and no. There are a limited number scattered throughout the map and they in turn, once developed with the correct structures, produce a set number of available resources for use that you can see at the top bar. But once you have them they don't go away. If, say, you used a horse to build a mounted unit that horse resource with be available to you again if the unit is killed. This means that if a horse tile gives you two horse resources then it can support two simultaneous mounted units, but this can be replenished indefinitely.

3) There's no direct answer to this as it depends on the wonder and the city. Wonders should be matched with what the city does: wonders producing gold in economic cities, culture wonders in culture cities, military wonders in military cities and so forth. But you need to balance this with how long it takes to produce them to avoid some other player building them first. This often results in production heavy cities often becoming wonder heavy. Use Great Engineers to build wonders in appropriate cities that otherwise wouldn't be able to build them on their own.

4) It depends on the situation. Puppets produce less unhappiness but doesn't allow you to customize their build orders. Personally I usually make a lot of puppet cities during military campaigns to avoid a happiness crash and then convert them back into annexed cities once I have the happiness to support them. But at times you need to annex cities immediately if they are strategically important to the campaign.

5) Again, depends on your overall strategy and the civilization you play. I say befriend as many as you can and conquer as many as you can afford, but avoid conquering too many unless you're going for a military victory since conquering city states turn opposing civilizations and other city states against you. Also keep an eye on the relationship between the city state and neighboring civs. If they are friendly towards one another you can spark an unwanted war. If you attack protected city states this is all but guaranteed.

So stuff will come back after I use it? Like Aluminum?

#13 Posted by Dolphin_Butter (1915 posts) -

@the_laughing_man: In the case of units, the resources will come back if said unit dies or you delete it. In the case of buildings, like using coal to make a factory, the resources will not come back.

#14 Posted by GS_Dan (1403 posts) -

@the_laughing_man: Resources don't disappear, they only get used. FOr example, if you have 4 iron and you build an iron unit, you have 3 iron left available. Should that unit die, you get that iron back so you have 4 again. The same works with trading. It took me a while to figure out.

If you want to really get into it, there's a tonne of depth available, even if this version has been 'simplified'. I'd recommend checking out reddit.com/r/civ5, everyone there is super helpful.

YouTubers worth checking out are SBFMadDjinn who seems to know as much about the AI as the developers and Quill18 who is also pretty good. Both of those guys do Let's Plays which are easy to follow and explain a lot.

#15 Posted by Wuddel (2092 posts) -

@gs_dan: well MadDjinn worked on gods & kings (tester, community member or advisor or something)

#16 Posted by GS_Dan (1403 posts) -

@wuddel: That's very cool. I wish he'd play more Civ, he hasn't posted anything that's interested me in months.

#17 Posted by CreepingDeath0 (176 posts) -

1. Watch out for Ghandi. That guy's a dick.

2. Likewise, Napoleon. Don't even bother playing with him.

3. Workers are really efficient when they are automated. Its one less thing to worry about in your early games.

#18 Edited by ThePickle (4168 posts) -

3. Workers are really efficient when they are automated. Its one less thing to worry about in your early games.

But, make sure they're not removing and replacing tiles. That can mess up your food supply if they start to replace a bunch of farms with other stuff.

#19 Edited by EpicSteve (6483 posts) -

Don't over think it. It's unlikely you'll dig yourself in a hole too deep to get out of. Be sure to use common sense when placing new cities. Don't have your territories be isolated or surrounded by another civilization.

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